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beretta

Driving Speed on Ice

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I was just wondering how fast everyone drives when they are on the ice? I go to BSU and a lot of students here park on Lake Bemidji. I had heard that it is safest to drive around 10mph, but I see a lot of people driving 50-60+. I would think this would cause wave action similar to your boats wake...? I was just wondering how fast ya'll drive?

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I also keep my speed around 10mph. i am not sure if speed creates a wave in thinner ice situations but I would assume so.

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I do not go over 15 mph. I was told when i was younger, if your driving fast on the ice, the water can move forwards, and break the ice in front of you which would intitle your truck to go down. So i never go fast on the ice.

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Thanks for the replies guys. I found an article by the US Army about it. Heres the link http://www.crrel.usace.army.mil/ierd/ice_safety/safety.html

"A load deflects the ice slightly into a bowl shape. When you drive on floating ice, this moving bowl generates waves in the water. If the speed of the waves equals the vehicle speed, the ice-sheet deflection is increased and the ice is much more likely to break. The problem is more serious for thin ice and shallow water. In general you avoid this danger by driving below 15 mph."

I wonder how much ice there has to be to keep a half ton pickup from breaking up the ice at 50-60 MPH?? crazy.gif

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Here's one I found from Canada. Its a handbook for on-ice operations: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/pubs_pol/hrpubs/TBM_119/CHAP5_3-1_e.asp they say 10MPH., but they give more info, such as if the ice is twice as thick as required for the load (a very squirrely calculation, at best), speed is not a major factor; and that in shallow water, speed becomes a much bigger factor than over deeper water. It also details the progression of radial cracks to circular cracks, aka, the dreaded spider web!

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Don't forget we are also driving on ice and snow? 20 to 25 MPH on a snow covered surface is good enough for me especially if there are people along the way.

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I'd always go with drive slowly around 10-15 mph, my reasoning is that you typically don't know the ice conditions you will be driving on out on any given lake. @0 mph gives you a little forgiveness if you see a crack, heave that wasn't there the last time you were out. Ice changes from day to day and fast speeds can really mess things up for others. Cars & trucks go through on the roads that are frequently traveled on an annual basis. I'd say stick to slower speeds especially at night. It is really easy to overdrive your headlights and get into trouble. If I was you, I'd take my time get out to fish and be safe. 50 mph doesn't allow you to react to changing conditions. Remember also that the guy coming at you might also be doing 50. Had a friend that was driving on the lake get hit by a snowmobile broadside that was doing over 80! Totalled the car, the sled and did some serious damage to both riders of the sled. All lived to walk(limp) away for another day but you can only control what you are doing out there and not what the other guy is doing. I like to putt along. I figure if I do go through at low speed I have alot more time to react. Hope, I never have to test that theory! My 2 cents.

Tunrevir~

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According to articles I've read the best speeds are below 15mph or above 20mph. Going between 15 and 20 can create a harmonic resonance that can crack the ice. That being said, you should be careful no matter how thick the ice is because current under the ice and other factors can make for thin spots on an otherwise safe lake.

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Watch the Discovery channel series on the Northern Canada ice road truckers. They explain very clearly why you are an (Contact Us Please) if you driver more than 15 mph on the ice and more than 10 mph close to the shore. That wave of water under the ice someone else talked about slaps against the rising bottom near shore and the space between the bottom and the ice narrows with the same amount of water being pushed into that space. That causes the ice to litterally "blow out" near the shore. The worst part about that is that the same thing would happen where underwater structure on the middle of the lake, say a hump or sunken island. I think people aren't very bright driving 30 or 60 on the ice. we've all seen it many times. I'd hate to be the one to cause someone else to go through the ice because I was in such a hurry that 3 or 4 minutes were literally a matter of life or death.

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Quote:

According to articles I've read the best speeds are below 15mph or above 20mph. Going between 15 and 20 can create a harmonic resonance that can crack the ice. That being said, you should be careful no matter how thick the ice is because current under the ice and other factors can make for thin spots on an otherwise safe lake.


As far as I have seen on the articles on the ice road driving in Canada and Alaska . They have right in the article where most speeds are kept at 25 km about 15 mph . The max speed that they are allowed is 30 km maybe about 18 or 19 mph , and they check the speeds with radar . Any faster will not be tolerated for these drivers . For their safety and the other drivers .This is off their site .

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What walter describes happened a few years ago on Buffalo Lake in Wright County - someone was booking it to the access where a bunch of trucks were parked on the ice, and the shock wave hit the shore and blew them all into the lake. Granted, the ice was still early ice, but the conditions were certainly ripe for it to happen, it is a good example to keep in mind.

Our perm is almost 5 miles offshore. At 10 MPH that is almost 30 minutes to get to it. Sure I'd like to get there quicker, but jeez... not worth the risk to me or my family and friends.

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Quote:

...someone was booking it to the access where a bunch of trucks were parked on the ice, and the shock wave hit the shore and blew them all into the lake.


All I can think of is bowling. grin.gif STRIKE!

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