Jump to content
  • GUESTS

    If you want access to members only forums on HSO, you will gain access only when you Sign-in or Sign-Up .

    This box will disappear once you are signed in as a member. 😀

  • RECEIVE THE GIFTS MEMBERS SHARE WITH YOU HERE...THEN...CREATE SOMETHING TO ENCHANT OTHERS THAT YOU WANT TO SHARE

    You know what we all love...

    When you enchant people, you fill them with delight and yourself in return. Have Fun!!!

Sign in to follow this  
gorrilla

Turkey breasts on the smoker

Recommended Posts

I have some turkey breasts thawed out for the smoker, and I would like some input on what injectors/marinades people like. Also and tips on temp, time, amount of smoke, etc. This is my first smoker - bought it at Gander - largest propane one they had. I can't wait, I think I'll season it tonight.

PS I've also got some goose jerky marinading and was wondering if I should smoke that seperately??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Smoking at the same time shouldn't be a problem, just have to watch the cooking time for the jerky and the breast because of the differences in thickness of the meat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would brine and/or marinade the turkey breast. Injecting is fine but I prefer to poke the flesh with a long tined fork and marinade at least 12 hours. Make the breasts as uniform in size as possible b4 placing in smoker. ( I prefer to tie them w/ butchers string, folding the "points" under. You will get a consistent smoke this way. Experiment with temp. depending on your ind. smokers characteristics but in general when you brine it you have a much more forgiving texture to the meat (you get away with higer temps as well)

due to the relative short smoke time (unlike brisket for example @ 14 hours for mine) you cannot use "too much" wood (smoke). I like less intense woods. If you must use hickory blend it w/ apple or cherry for a nice balance.

start experimenting at steady temp. of 250 to 275 for anywhere from 2 to 4 hours depending on size of breast. always take internal temp.

As far as jerkey you want to "cold smoke" it seperately for sure. uniform sizing is critical. any more info let me know. I have been doing it for over 25 years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cold smoking is (somewhat) exactly as it sounds, minimum temperatures (in general,190 degrees or less) with more smoke as the preserving agent. (paired with as a rule, a cure and/or brine before)

Now I will advise that inexperienced "cooks" take extreme caution due to the fact u are "cooking" in the ideal temperature range for microbial/bacteria growth, but when done corrrectly, you will produce great results. For me ( I am a professional chef) it is a great way to "par-cook" (partially cook) certain meats, vegetables etc.. which are in turn finished later on the grill. I do a cold smoked pork chop with rosemary & clover honey that is finished on an open fire grill that is fantastic. You end up with a very moist (low shrinkage) product.

Chef's love to cold smoke even "odd" ingredients like 1# blocks of butter (temperature is obviously critical) for a subtle flavor profile for seafood dishes.

Cold smoked salmon is probable the most recognized product that is commercially available.( you could say Ham is an example too.) The Salmon, for example should have a finished texture somewhat like Lox ( a cured ONLY Jewish specialty) which in the end, has a "buttery" smooth taste & texture.

Sorry for the long answer but its what I do for fun & profit cool.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Duckerdave,

Could you elaborate on the cold smoked butter, technique and uses? About the only things I cold smoke are some sausages, cheese and loin chops on occasion. I'm a longtime serious hot smoker and barbecue head and have never heard of cold smoking butter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  



  • Your Responses - Share & Have Fun :)

    • Yeah, that kinda seems like what it should do with a 60hp motor.  What's a hefty dude?  Like 3 bills?   I'm kind of surprised a 60 is the max for the boat.  My 82 alumacraft is rated for a 60, same length but my beam is probably a foot and a half less.
    • Have you tried working with the tilt a bit like having it most the way or all the way down when taking off with a heavy load, then trimming it up more once on plane?  Even though you have the right prop there are other pitches you can buy for a better hole shot.  My 17' Starcraft with a wheel and windshield is rated for 125hp but pops right up even with 4-5 people in it with a 75hp Merc on it.    You might even try the ugly bolt-on trim tail on the motor.
    • Back home in Mizzura there was a little town that had a sucker festival on the spring.     They get scaled, fileted with the skin on and then the meat is scored.  Then they are breaded and into the deep fryer.  Apparently the scoring lets the hot oil dissolve the bones and it gives deep fried sucker a distinct look.   I thought they were pretty decent.  Once you deep fry the heck out of something it just tastes like deep fry though.
    • So that is still under warranty?   Do those lights run off a photosensor and come on automatically?  Could you pull the appropriate fuse so the truck would still run and not die until you can get it to the dealer?  
    • That is a lot of boat for a 60 hp motor, esp when loaded with 700 pounds of beef...     Another possibility, since the boat is new to you, is that the foam flotation has gotten water logged over the years.      It might be interesting to take the boat on the trailer and get it weighed someplace.    Compare the result to a calculated weight for boat motor trailer gas batteries etc.      Or maybe remove a panel in the floor and see if the foam is wet.     A few hundred pounds of water (I found one account where the guy weighed the soggy foam he removed and got 525 pounds) would make a big difference.     
    • I bought my first boat last September and I have a question about weight distribution. I was warned that it's a heavy boat by the seller, he called it a tank. In a good way. It's very sturdy in big water. So that's cool, but the first time I had a third adult hop in, the boat basically turned into a barge and just plowed water. With two "hefty" adults, gear and a cooler I have no complaints. It gets up on a plane no problem and scoots along just like you'd expect it to. Adding a third, non-hefty adult and gear was too much for it though. It couldn't get up on plane and the front end just plowed water.    It has a 24v trolling motor on the bow. The two marine 12v batteries for the trolling motor are also in the front, not all the way in front, but close. A buddy said he'd try moving the batteries to the rear. So what I'm wondering is, how much weight can you put in the rear of these boats and is this a good idea? Assuming they'd even physically fit. The main battery is already in the rear.    As a comparison, I have a 17' with a 60 HP 2 stroke and my dad has a 16' with a 50 HP 4 stroke, both tillers. My dad's boat slows down a bit with all of us in it, but easily gets up on plane and operates normally. His boat is a little more on the bare bones side and his motor is a good 10 years newer, but otherwise it's basically the same setup, but smaller, and it moves all of us around very well. This makes me wonder if my boat is or should be capable of more.    I also thought of the possibility that my old 1997 2 stroke is just tired (is that a thing?), but it seems to run very well. I also took it to what I think is a good repair shop and they assured me that I have the correct prop.    Here's all the info I can think of and a few pics.   1996 Alumacraft Competitor 170 1997 Mercury 60 HP 2 Stroke (60 HP is the max HP rating) 85" Beam (or close to that, can't remember for sure)   Try moving the batteries? Save up for a new motor? Or that's just the way it's going to be? Any advice from the community would be very much appreciated!  
    • Hello from the NW Angle! Areas of slush on trails in Minnesota are refreezing overnight and are still in good condition if well-traveled.  Walleye action is getting better every day, with mornings and late evening being best.  Rippin’ raps and buckshots are enticing violent strikes; 18-22 ft of water is key. Big northern pike are hitting jiggin’ spoons and tip ups with large baits. Anglers venturing into Canada continue to find schooled Crappies and big walleye deeper into 30+ feet. A slow presentation is most effective for catching crappies.  Until next week, Sunset Lodge
    • Yesterday the exterior lights under the side mirrors, all pick up bed lights and the tailgate light would intermittently turn on and go off.  I checked to make sure all doors were shut and checked all the lighting options in the vehicle.  The light issue killed my battery and it is very slow to take a charge.  Has anyone seen something like this?  I checked on line and didn't see any mention of an issue like this.   My truck is a 2017 Ford F150 Lariat with the 3.5 ecoboost.  I called the dealership and they said they could get it in the week of April 22.  A lot of good that is going to do me when the vehicle is dead.
    • Thanks guys, looks like I need to give it a try!
    • Last summer my son caught a 30.5" walleye on a local lake. It was a hot day so we put it back pretty quickly. We decided to surprise him with a Replica. Fiber Tech out of Nisswa did an amazing job! Only took 6 weeks once I made the call. I will use them again.
×
×
  • Create New...