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gorrilla

Turkey breasts on the smoker

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I have some turkey breasts thawed out for the smoker, and I would like some input on what injectors/marinades people like. Also and tips on temp, time, amount of smoke, etc. This is my first smoker - bought it at Gander - largest propane one they had. I can't wait, I think I'll season it tonight.

PS I've also got some goose jerky marinading and was wondering if I should smoke that seperately??

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Smoking at the same time shouldn't be a problem, just have to watch the cooking time for the jerky and the breast because of the differences in thickness of the meat.

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I would brine and/or marinade the turkey breast. Injecting is fine but I prefer to poke the flesh with a long tined fork and marinade at least 12 hours. Make the breasts as uniform in size as possible b4 placing in smoker. ( I prefer to tie them w/ butchers string, folding the "points" under. You will get a consistent smoke this way. Experiment with temp. depending on your ind. smokers characteristics but in general when you brine it you have a much more forgiving texture to the meat (you get away with higer temps as well)

due to the relative short smoke time (unlike brisket for example @ 14 hours for mine) you cannot use "too much" wood (smoke). I like less intense woods. If you must use hickory blend it w/ apple or cherry for a nice balance.

start experimenting at steady temp. of 250 to 275 for anywhere from 2 to 4 hours depending on size of breast. always take internal temp.

As far as jerkey you want to "cold smoke" it seperately for sure. uniform sizing is critical. any more info let me know. I have been doing it for over 25 years.

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Cold smoking is (somewhat) exactly as it sounds, minimum temperatures (in general,190 degrees or less) with more smoke as the preserving agent. (paired with as a rule, a cure and/or brine before)

Now I will advise that inexperienced "cooks" take extreme caution due to the fact u are "cooking" in the ideal temperature range for microbial/bacteria growth, but when done corrrectly, you will produce great results. For me ( I am a professional chef) it is a great way to "par-cook" (partially cook) certain meats, vegetables etc.. which are in turn finished later on the grill. I do a cold smoked pork chop with rosemary & clover honey that is finished on an open fire grill that is fantastic. You end up with a very moist (low shrinkage) product.

Chef's love to cold smoke even "odd" ingredients like 1# blocks of butter (temperature is obviously critical) for a subtle flavor profile for seafood dishes.

Cold smoked salmon is probable the most recognized product that is commercially available.( you could say Ham is an example too.) The Salmon, for example should have a finished texture somewhat like Lox ( a cured ONLY Jewish specialty) which in the end, has a "buttery" smooth taste & texture.

Sorry for the long answer but its what I do for fun & profit cool.gif

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Duckerdave,

Could you elaborate on the cold smoked butter, technique and uses? About the only things I cold smoke are some sausages, cheese and loin chops on occasion. I'm a longtime serious hot smoker and barbecue head and have never heard of cold smoking butter.

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