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dukhnt

Just Learning (Waterfowl Photos)

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Just got a new camera (D50) for xmas and bought a good used lens last week. Thanks again Tom. What do you guys think of the pics.

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it makes me wanna get my shotgun out again, duck season seems so far away!

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Quote:

What do you guys think of the pics.


I think they honestly look alot like the ones I was taking last year at this time... you'll keep learning about your camera and lenses and before you know it you'll realized you've spent a ton of dough and are a photo addict and will do anything to keep improving ie... many many hours in front of your computer reading about things that will help you improve. Like Tom and Hobby told me when I started... "see how many of the pics you take now are keepers in a year" and I'll say the same thing to you my friend as you'll keep getting better. wink.gif Practice, Practice, Practice. grin.gif

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Nice work, dukhnt.

You're in for a lot of fun now.

I'm not into photo critiques here unless someone asks for one, because many here just want to share, not to get into all that. But, since you asked . . .

No. 2, 3 and 5 are sharp. No. 1 and 4 are not. You can do some sharpening in post processing, but it just looks like the lens wasn't held steady enough in 1 and 4, because no portion of either image is quite as sharp as your lens can provide. Flying ducks, once you get the hang of it, are as easy to shoot as they are with a gun. You bag some, you miss some. grin.gif And, like with a shotgun, the more you shoot with a camera the more patience you will develop to allow you to wait until ducks flying toward you are in range before pulling the trigger. Those ducks in No. 2 and 3 are sharp, and No. 3 in particular will be even nicer when it comes in closer and fills more of the frame.

I'm a sucker for hooded merganser shots. I'd stake that drake out and keep at him, making sure you have as much shutter speed as you can get and keeping your hand as steady as possible. If you don't have a tripod or monopod, you should invest in one or the other. If your lens is a VR lens (Nikon speak for vibration reduction), you probably can get by with the monopod. If it's not VR, then on cloudy days you'll probably not have enough light to get the majority of your shots sharp enough, and should learn to rely on a sturdy tripod with an affordable ball head. I use a Bogen/Manfrotto tripod that supports up to eight pounds (good enough for my primary telephoto zoom and body) and has a built-in ballhead. Quite sturdy and sells for about $100.

Have fun. Some of these shots are very pretty, and they are among your first. It's cool to be proud of what you've accomplished while working to get better. That way you'll be able to take pleasure in what you're doing while at the same time realizing your work will improve the more you do it.

Lots of experience and expertise on this board, so dip into it whenever you feel the need by asking specific questions. It's also helpful to share your exif data and lens info, such as which lens, iso, shutter speed, aperture, etc., because it helps us tell you if your techs are on or not, and those who have used the lens before can tell you what to expect quality-wise. Not everyone posts this data with their shots. I've gotten in the habit of doing it partly because people with less experience can look at those readings and see what can be done at various settings, and because, when looking for feedback, it's very helpful.

And keep showing us your work. grin.gif

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Josh,

It looks as though you are already getting the hang of that lens. These look prety good. Your shutter speed suffered some in the low light photos, as they will with that lens, but you're gonna do fine with it. I'm glad your happy with it. Keep shooting Bud, and keep learning.

God bless,

Tom W

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The pics are great. The last one is best, with the lead bird set with flared wings and gear down. The others behind in different configs for landing. The first mallard shot has nice curls. It's fun to see him in the climb and accelerating phase.

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I like the hen mallard. Can not say why... it is in a pose that looks like it should be standing on the ground rather than up in the air. It has that some one jumped on the other end of the teeter totter and now here I am flying look to it or something. Nice pictures though and thanks for sharing!!! Take care and N Joy the Hunt.'/./Jimbo

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Thanks guys for all the replies and info. I will try to keep them coming and hopefully they will only get better. I do have a lot to learn, having only owned point and shoot cameras before this. Any help is greatly appreciated.

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