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My partner shot this nice bull in AZ last month.  We got 200 lbs of meat off him.  The steaks - even the backstraps - are so tough as to be almost inedible.  

 

Any proven tips to help us eat all this fine meat?

 

 

71105755_10212902292786256_859922022539460608_n.jpg

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i cringe to say this.......especially with elk meat but...........burger.............crock pot type dishes or marinades!!!!!!! sausage, hot dogs???????????? jerky???????????

 

nice animal bythe way!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Edited by smurfy

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Just now, smurfy said:

i cringe to say this.......especially with elk meat but...........burger.............crock pot type dishes or marinades!!!!!!! sausage, hot dogs???????????? jerky???????????

 

There's a bunch that will be ground, lots of that turned into sausage.  Also saved a bunch for jerky, but those steaks.....

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Lot of work for that much meat but I got me one of these that seems to work pretty well. I just use it on each meal as I take it out for dinner.  The fine thin blades don't turn it in to mush! Animals from hotter-drier states seem to be tougher because they don't have as much lush greens to eat. IMO. 

 

Jaccard 45 Knife Meat Tenderizer

by Jaccard

 

image.thumb.png.8aa8ecdd73801dbfa7783cffd5b34e66.png

Edited by leech~~

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1 hour ago, DonBo said:

My partner shot this nice bull in AZ last month.  We got 200 lbs of meat off him.  The steaks - even the backstraps - are so tough as to be almost inedible.  

 

Any proven tips to help us eat all this fine meat?

 

 

 

Sous vide.   It allows cooking a long time to break down collagen without overcooking and drying out the very lean meat.    Circulators are quite affordable these days, and you probably already have a vacuum sealer.   You can experiment with the time.   I would start at about 4-5 hours for steak.    It sure works for cheap sirloin beef.   

 

After cooking, cool it down in a ice bath for a little while, pat it dry, and sear it for a very short time on a screaming hot cast iron pan or on a roaring grill.   Like 30 seconds to maybe a minute.   Get a crust without cooking the inside.   

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53 minutes ago, delcecchi said:

Sous vide.     

After cookin, cool it down in a ice bath for a little while, pat it dry, and sear it for a very short time on a screaming hot cast iron pan or on a roaring grill.   Like 30 seconds to maybe a minute.   Get a crust without cooking the inside.   

 

I'll have to pass this on to 2 friends that are big fans of sous vide. Several other people and myself think the meat prepared this way seems like an incomplete dish. Like it should be part of a stew or soup but doesn't appeal to us as a stand alone meat. Searing before serving sounds like a good fix.

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I usually pour marinade into the packages of deer steaks right before I vacuum seal them to allow some of the marinade to be sucked into the meat. I leave them in the fridge 1 day to marinate before freezing. Not sure if this will help in your case but it couldn't hurt.

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10 minutes ago, Big Dave2 said:

I usually pour marinade into the packages of deer steaks right before I vacuum seal them to allow some of the marinade to be sucked into the meat. I leave them in the fridge 1 day to marinate before freezing. Not sure if this will help in your case but it couldn't hurt.

 

 

Too late, but an interesting idea.  What does everyone use for a tenderizing mariande?

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1 minute ago, DonBo said:

 

 

Too late, but an interesting idea.  What does everyone use for a tenderizing mariande?

 

I use Wishbone Robusto Italian dressing. Most of the meat I marinade is feral pork from OK. Even the chops are tough. I cut them a little thinner than I would domestic pork and marinade them for 18 to 24 hours before grilling.

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3 minutes ago, Mike89 said:

there are many marinates out there, so go with the flavors you like!!!!  

 

But do all marinades tenderize?  I always thought they were just for flavor.

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The vinegar in Italian dressing tenderizes the meat and according to google other acids like citrus juice will too:

 

Can you use vinegar to tenderize meat?

 

When applied to beef, acids soften tough muscle at the same time that they give meat more flavor. What's more, flavorful acids run the gamut from simple vinegar to citrus or tomato juices. Choose balsamic, apple cider or plain white vinegar, or tenderize with lemon, lime or even orange juice.

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3 hours ago, DonBo said:

 

But do all marinades tenderize?  I always thought they were just for flavor.

depending on whats in there.. apple juice is one other you can use or you can make your own also...salt is a key part..  Good luck too!!!!

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6 hours ago, Pat K said:

 

I'll have to pass this on to 2 friends that are big fans of sous vide. Several other people and myself think the meat prepared this way seems like an incomplete dish. Like it should be part of a stew or soup but doesn't appeal to us as a stand alone meat. Searing before serving sounds like a good fix.

Of course, sear the steak or roast before serving.   In fact some folks sear before sous vide and again after.     Sous Vide can really help with the toughness problem.   

 

Normally tough cuts are cooked low and slow with moist heat, like brisket with the texas crutch, or 321 ribs.   But that means they will be cooked well done.   Sous Vide lets you cook lower and slower and keep that nice medium rare doneness.   

 

I did a beef rump roast for like 36 hours at 132 this summer.  It was great.... seared it on the grill.   

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7 hours ago, DonBo said:

 

 

Too late, but an interesting idea.  What does everyone use for a tenderizing mariande?

 

 I usually use soy sauce and lemon juice among other things in my marinade which usually does a good job of tenderizing. You can even use Coca Cola. 

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Maybe you could shave it thin across grain and stick it in the slow cooker. Or dice up and slow cook in chili.

Edited by Grainbelt

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I really think to rid you and your friend of this dasturdly problem you should just send the rest of the meat up to me and just let me deal with it 😊😎😂

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I think a slow cooked meal for that for aprox 24 hours won't work! Maybe try grinding it and adding some meat tenderizer. What if you boil if first and also use a pressure cooker to make it as a stew. 

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This is a lot of really bad advice and the problem is that the meat has not been aged.  Beef is similarly tough and chewy if not aged.  If you don't believe me take a package of backstraps and leave them thawed in the fridge for a minimum of 7 days and up to 14.  Cook them up to a max internal temp of 150 and you will see the difference.   

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On 10/27/2019 at 2:56 AM, Mad Mulcher said:

This is a lot of really bad advice and the problem is that the meat has not been aged.  Beef is similarly tough and chewy if not aged.  If you don't believe me take a package of backstraps and leave them thawed in the fridge for a minimum of 7 days and up to 14.  Cook them up to a max internal temp of 150 and you will see the difference.   

 

Meat spent over a week in a fridge before packaging.  Believe me, it's an old tough bull that was rutting hard.  Backstraps are okay, though not great.  Have not yet found anything that will tender up the steaks.

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21 minutes ago, DonBo said:

 

Meat spent over a week in a fridge before packaging.  Believe me, it's an old tough bull that was rutting hard.  Backstraps are okay, though not great.  Have not yet found anything that will tender up the steaks.

 

He's using my Gizmo above. 

 

 

Edited by leech~~

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