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Directional Tires?

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1 hour ago, Jeremy airjer W said:

Swap the tires side to side, of course.

 

So every time you want to back up you have to swap the tires out? Seems like a lot of work. 😕

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I'm thinking I'll just have to be like a Harley driver and always park in a loop heading out? This is going to suck pulling the sled trailer not being able to back up! 😞

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12 hours ago, leech~~ said:

I'm thinking I'll just have to be like a Harley driver and always park in a loop heading out? This is going to suck pulling the sled trailer not being able to back up! 😞


 

now now!!!  seen many other brands do that!!!    :)

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1 hour ago, Mike89 said:


 

now now!!!  seen many other brands do that!!!    :)

 

Goldwing's got reverse!  And non-directional tires😉

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59 minutes ago, leech~~ said:

 

Goldwing's got reverse!  And non-directional tires😉

 

 

so do H-D!!  :)

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Don't worry about it, you can even put the directional tires on backwards.......

 

 

Performance gap small if running directional tire backwards

 

All tire companies will tell you that it is unsafe to run directional tires backwards. It is the easy lawyer-correct answer.

 

In the dry, it really is not much of an issue as it is how much rubber contacts the ground rather than how the grooves are cut. You are correct, though, directional tires are meant to turn and grip in one direction.

 

Originally it was not just the tread pattern that mattered but also the belt package underneath. How the belts were joined in an overlapping fashion and stresses longitudinally could affect the join. With the advent of a continuous spiral (mummy-like wrapping) over the top of the belts, that concern is now gone.

 

Actual stats for loss of wet grip are not really available. The last ones I saw were from the late 1980s early ’90s on tires that had a v-shaped tread only. In that case, the grip loss was from 18 to 22 per cent when the tire was run backwards in the wet, depending on brand.

 

These days, the answer is less clear because most directional tires use two types of rain evacuation tread patterns.

It is popular to have circumferential grooves, which spit water out the back of the tire and combine that with angled or V-shaped grooves that channel the water out to the side or at least to the circumferential grooves.

 

Running one of these newer tires backwards would only affect the circumferential grooves a little bit since the feeder channels would not be working correctly. The angled V-channels would not work as well as they should.

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