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First I know the answer is you wont know until you dig, but I am looking for a ballpark answer.  Within about one square mile I have looked up depths on other wells ranging from 75-150(most around 90-120 feet deep.  Does the water table move that much in a small area or do different companies just drill to different depths for some reason?  We are looking at a well, just concerned that you hear about some companies that drill an extra 50 feet just to charge an extra 1000 at 20 a foot.  Also, assuming we know how to do all the wiring and plumbing once the casing is in, do we save much money by doing that part our selves?

Thanks,

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Maybe the differing depths are due to differing aquifers being used.  Might be due to the topography - the 150 is on the top of a hill and the 75 is on the bottom?

As for a DIY, sure you can probably do it yourself.  But does the well guy have to sign off on a job to get the county inspector to sign off on a job?  Do you know how far down you're supposed to put the pump?  If you screw it up somehow is the well guy going to dig a new one for free? 

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The well depths can vary on different parts of a parcel depending on topography. The well driller is looking to hit a minimum flow rate such as 40-50 gpm and changes in composition can impact that. Some may also suggest going deeper to provide either higher volume or a bigger buffer to provide flow in the event that the water table drops.

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And, putting in a submersible pump hanging on the end of  a hundred feet of pipe is a non-trivial job, especially if you have never done it before.   I am guilty myself of the occasional "how hard can it be" episode, but this is one I myself wouldn't have tried even in my younger days.  

And yes the acquifer can go up and down some due to hills and valleys in the underground rock, but it shouldn't be major.  What do they use in your area, the Jordan?    That was a popular one here in Rochester, although I have lost track in recent years. 

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3 minutes ago, delcecchi said:

And, putting in a submersible pump hanging on the end of  a hundred feet of pipe is a non-trivial job, especially if you have never done it before.   I am guilty myself of the occasional "how hard can it be" episode, but this is one I myself wouldn't have tried even in my younger days.  

And yes the acquifer can go up and down some due to hills and valleys in the underground rock, but it shouldn't be major.  What do they use in your area, the Jordan?    That was a popular one here in Rochester, although I have lost track in recent years. 

Not sure we're up in Alexandria.  I know someone with a tripod made for lowering the pump, so I'm not worried about that, also as far as the wiring and plumbing we have plenty experience there so I'm not to worried.  Just not sure if its much of a money saver, a lot of times companies that buy in bulk get a better deal than you can buying yourself anyhow.

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You never really know for sure till you start drilling. Most likely it will be similar to others in the area but that's not a guarantee. I doubt you will save all that much (but you can always ask) by doing the rest yourself. And I'm sure they wont warranty your work.

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1 minute ago, Walleyehooker said:

You never really know for sure till you start drilling. Most likely it will be similar to others in the area but that's not a guarantee. I doubt you will save all that much (but you can always ask) by doing the rest yourself. And I'm sure they wont warranty your work.

Have been told by a couple companies we aren't able to be warrantied anyhow.  Our cabin is seasonal and we are unable to heat it so we have to shut down water in the winter so nothing freezes.  Apparently this is something a number of them wont warranty.  Unfortunate but its what we have to work with.

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Just now, PurpleFloyd said:

You need to put in the well casings first. You also need to grout the casing around the outside and do that properly. 

Yes, you can do it yourself.only you can say whether that is the best option

All work on the casing will be done by a drilling company.  I'm simply talking about lowering the pump and plumbing and wiring.  Another reason is if we pay them to plumb and wire we will likely be ripping it all up in 5-10 years to rebuild the cabin(hopfully).  Thanks for all the input.

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33 minutes ago, Moon Lake Refuge said:

Not sure we're up in Alexandria.  I know someone with a tripod made for lowering the pump, so I'm not worried about that, also as far as the wiring and plumbing we have plenty experience there so I'm not to worried.  Just not sure if its much of a money saver, a lot of times companies that buy in bulk get a better deal than you can buying yourself anyhow.

That may be different then.  In Cook, by lake Vermilion the depth to get water can vary greatly in just a few hundred feet.  My buddy had to go down 350 and then they had to frack to get water.   Other people in the immediate area had to go much less.  But that is not a classic aquifer area where they drill into a big layer of porous sandstone. 

I found this cool tool from the state that lets you see all the wells in your area, and click to display depth, location etc. 

No wells show up until you zoom in pretty far, took me a few minutes to figure that out.   

https://apps.health.state.mn.us/cwi/#

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Then, I would say that there is some variation underground and also some variation on top of the ground but 20 to 30 feet  of variation doesn't strike me as a big deal.   How much of the well has to be cased and grouted?    That affects the cost also. 

Sounds like you have it under control.   

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If that is the case it's a lot easier but at that point you may not be saving that much doing it yourself.

How much do they charge to drop in the pump?

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One guy was at 1500 for purchase of a pump, plumbed and wired.  The others just quoted all in so I dont know how much that was.  But I could drop a pump and plumb and wire for quite a bit less than that so I dont know if that high, low or normal.

25 minutes ago, delcecchi said:

Then, I would say that there is some variation underground and also some variation on top of the ground but 20 to 30 feet  of variation doesn't strike me as a big deal.   How much of the well has to be cased and grouted?    That affects the cost also. 

Sounds like you have it under control.   

Not sure on that but that's part I'm committed to pay regardless of what comes out.  Not looking to cut corners on any of it just wanted to look into the parts I know I can do myself and save where I can.

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You should be able to save some money doing it yourself.  Looks like 6-700 bucks by my dumb estimate for plumbing parts, depending on what all you include.  Another 100 or so for electrical.  

I was surprised by how expensive the poly pipe that is used in the well is. 

Would you say it is a one man job, or does it take a helper?  Are you sure you know what you are doing with regard to wells and stuff specifically?  I would have to study up for sure, not that that has stopped me in the past.  

Say you save 500 bucks, what are you giving up in terms of guarantee, service, etc? 

Just stuff I thought about.  You probably have too.  I'm not trying to insult anyone's intelligence or anything. 

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That was about my estimate too.  I did some research and talked to a guy who did them and am convinced I can handle it.  He has the tripod for lowering the pump one section of pipe at a time that he told me I could use.  Also, my gaurantee of service is only good until the end of the summer.  Once I turn it off for the winter I was told my warranty ends.  That may be different with other companies I dont know so I'll start there.  All good info and still in the earlier stage but appreciate all the help!

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Put in a new well three years ago by Weisel. I have no problem recommending them. Their prefer to use rigid PVC pipe rather than tubing to hang the pump on. The reason is that tubing will flex and bang against the inside of the casing when the pump starts causing premature wearing. If you decide to hang the pump on rigid PVC you might find it a little more work than you want to get it all together 10 feet at a time if you don't have the drill head to help out. Just a thought.

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3 hours ago, BobT said:

Put in a new well three years ago by Weisel. I have no problem recommending them. Their prefer to use rigid PVC pipe rather than tubing to hang the pump on. The reason is that tubing will flex and bang against the inside of the casing when the pump starts causing premature wearing. If you decide to hang the pump on rigid PVC you might find it a little more work than you want to get it all together 10 feet at a time if you don't have the drill head to help out. Just a thought.

Where are they located out of? 

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They are listed as Alexandria but their location is south of Lake Oscar. 

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