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Cooperman

Chicken wings in the oven

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I know most can relate to attending a botulism buffet at work, or being dragged to a graduation picnic where there is at least 3 crockpot full of wings brought by people that think you dump in raw wings (sometimes with the tips still attached) cover with a bottle of Ken Davis, and you're done. Nothing like biting into a rubbery, fatty, slimy chicken wing, right? That being said, I have always believed that chicken wings are not wings unless they are deep fry'd. Well, tomorrow I won't be using the crockpot, but will try making crispy wings in the oven. I found a method on-line that I'm hoping will work. This is how it is supposed to work. You take 4 lbs of wings, toss them in 2 Tbls baking powder to lightly coat. (This is suppose to remove moisture from the skin) Put them in the oven on the lower rack and bake for 30 min at 250 degrees F. This is supposed to render the fat from the wings. Next move to the upper middle rack andcontinue baking at 425 for 40 to 50 min. Toss wings in whatever sauce you like. I'm trying these for the game tomorrow, I'll let you know.

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That is a interesting method and I'll be waiting for the results. Haven't used the baking powder trick before and am always ready for something new.  good luck.

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Here is crockpot recipe from Cooks Country...  gotta get my money's worth from the web page.

low-Cooker Sticky Wings

From Cook's Country | February/March 2010

Why this recipe works:

When we tried adding the sauce for our Slow-Cooker Sticky Wings to the slow cooker, the juices from the wings drowned it out. Instead, we cooked the wings bare. A sauce of soy sauce, tomato paste, brown sugar, garlic, ginger, and cayenne won out over more complex options. For through-and-through flavor, we borrowed an idea from barbecue pit masters and coated the wings with a spicy paste before cooking. Achieving an acceptable level of stickiness wasn’t possible with a slow cooker alone. To give the wings their requisite “stick," we painted the cooked wings with sauce and set them under the broiler.

less

Serves 12

In step 3, the oven rack should be 10 to 12 inches from the broiler element. Don’t wander off while the wings are in the oven.

Ingredients

  • 1 (3-inch) piece fresh ginger, peeled and chopped
  • 4 garlic cloves, peeled
  • 3/4 cup packed dark brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup soy sauce
  • 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 4 pounds chicken wings, halved at joint and wingtips removed
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1/4 cup tomato paste

Instructions

  1.  

    1. MAKE RUB Pulse ginger, garlic, 1/4 cup sugar, 1 tablespoon soy sauce, and 1/4 teaspoon cayenne in food processor until finely ground. Add mixture to slow cooker insert. Add chicken and toss until combined.

    2. COOK AND COOL Cover and cook on low until fat renders and chicken is tender, 3 to 4 hours. Using slotted spoon, remove wings from slow cooker and transfer to clean large bowl (discard liquid in slow cooker). Let wings cool 20 minutes (or cool briefly and refrigerate up to 24 hours).

    3. SAUCE AND BROIL Adjust oven rack to lower-middle position and heat broiler. Set wire rack inside rimmed baking sheet and spray rack with baking spray. Whisk water, tomato paste, remaining sugar, remaining soy sauce, and remaining cayenne in bowl. Add half of sauce to bowl with cooled wings and toss gently to coat. Arrange wings, skin side up, on prepared rack. Broil until wings are lightly charred and crisp around edges, 10 to 15 minutes. Flip wings, brush with remaining sauce, and continue to broil until well caramelized, about 3 minutes. Serve.

     

Slow-Cooker Solution

 

Most slow-cooker recipes for sticky wings cook the sauce and the wings together, which results in a bland, greasy, watery mess. We cook the wings with a small amount of a potent paste so they can soak up flavor as they render fat, then coat them with the sauce at the end.

 

aside_SIL_StickyWings_HomemadeSauce_2764

THROW IT OUTFour pounds of chicken wings render about 2 cups of fat. Most recipes incorporate this fat into the sauce. We throw it out.

aside_SIL_StickyWingSauce_03_276459.jpg

SAUCE BEFORE BROILINGA quick dump-and-stir sauce coats the wings just before they go under the broiler. The sauce caramelizes in less than 20 minutes.

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My easy way...I find if you do them on a broiler pan (with the slots, or even put a cooling rack on a cookie sheet, wings on top of rack) at 375*- 400* and flip over occasionally, and last 15 mns or so, put your sauce or sprinkle your rub on, they'll turn out swell. The grease drips thru the rack/slots, and the hot air from below seems to bake more evenly. I came up with that  a few years back after getting soggy wings. That's why wings on the grill work so well. the grease cooks out and you get nice even heat to brown them.... :)

Edited by RebelSS

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4 minutes ago, Bsmokin said:

I seasoned the wings, smoked for an hour, put in the fridge and will be frying in a couple hours to finish off!! Can't wait!!

Sounds good,  welcome to the forums Bsmokin!!!

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Baked wings are great.  Did it a couple of times and really liked them..375 for a hour and 15 minutes..   Swirled them in olive oil, mixed with Worcestershire, soy sauce, lots of garlic powder,paprika etc. and threw them in the oven on a cookie sheet.  Easy and good, 

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Update: the wings turned out great. They were nice and crispy, not fatty at all. The only part of the recipe that I would question is the 250F for 30 minutes. It didn't seem to render much fat, maybe it sets the baking powder, or drys out the skin? Del has the exact recipe on his "wings" post if you want to try it.

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Cooper - I do wings in the oven, but don't do the 30 minutes at 250.  A trick I learned from a friend is to let the wings sit in the fridge uncovered for a night.  This dries out the skin and helps achieve a crispier wing.  

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We steam ours first in batches for twenty minutes, gets a lot of the fat off. Then in the fridge for a few hours or overnight to further dry them out. Placed on a baking rack/cookie sheet with aluminum foil on it but hundreds of holes punched in to let fat drip through. (A lot easier to clean the baking rack afterwards)  Than 20 minutes in a 375 oven, flip and bake for another twenty minutes.

Steamer.....

steamer.jpg

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I have a couple of wing/drumstick racks, which work on a grill or in the oven (set the rack in a drip pan).  What I like is the fats render out, there is no turning and the meat shrinks faster than the skin during the cook, which allows the skin to crisp up.  You need a 3-part wing, because the tips are used to lock the wing into the rack.  If you want to glaze them, just lift out the entire rack and brush on the glaze. 

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Here are two racks of drumsticks (24 count).

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I like that, thirdeye!  Seems folks are making it way more difficult to cook wings than it has to be. Your method or my earlier posted one is so easy...get the wings "off the cooking" surface, and provide a way for them to drip. Nothin' to it. I haven't seen those, where did you get them?

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20 minutes ago, RebelSS said:

I like that, thirdeye!  Seems folks are making it way more difficult to cook wings than it has to be. Your method or my earlier posted one is so easy...get the wings "off the cooking" surface, and provide a way for them to drip. Nothin' to it. I haven't seen those, where did you get them?

One of the big box stores had them in the grilling section, I recall around $10 each.  Mine are Bayou Classic brand.  A couple of years ago on another forum someone had some that had folding legs, so they stored flat.

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