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Bullheads


WalleyeSlayer21

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my guess is bullheads pretty much bury themselves in the mud and hibernate like a turtle!

after all, it's the bullheads that really get fired up in the heat of the summer, so I would say they aren't the most active fish in the winter

I don't even know if they school up in the winter like carp and cats

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from the Iowa DNR

Once water temperatures fall below 60 degrees F, bullhead fishing is all but over in Iowa. Their metabolism slows and the need for food decreases. An occasional bullhead will be caught by ice fishermen, but the catch rate is so low that bullhead fishing is considered non-existent during winter months and the bullhead fishermen must patiently wait for another spring.

*Mayhew, J. (editor). 1987. Iowa Fish and Fishing. Iowa Department of Natural Resources, Des Moines, Iowa. 323 pp.

here's some more form a Michigan angler who has a site with Fishing Tips

In the winter, bullhead catfish partially bury themselves in the mud at the bottom and go into a semi-hibernation phase. If you want to eat bullheads in the winter, you’ll probably have to freeze some in the fall.

Though a few horned pout can be caught through the ice, it's not usually worth trying in the winter. Bullheads are extremely inactive in cold water and will not cooperate. Of course, if you're in the deep South, such as Florida or Texas, bullheads could bite (or even spawn) all year round, so you're in luck.

I'm still looking for the premiere summer bullhead spot in the metro where I can let my girls loose to catch some.

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I have seen bullheads on camera on O'Dowd (which has some of the largest bullheads around here), but they won't bite. I think they do something more like flathead catfish as far as not needing to eat all winter. Channel catfish will bite, but even they tone down the aggression by a factor of about 1000 compared to their summer style.

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  • 2 weeks later...

My buddy caught one last year thru the ice....and also had one swim up his hole that same night while fishing Crappies in about 25ft. of water..... There was a die off in that lake that winter, so that may have had something to do with the odd behavior.

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from the Iowa DNR

Once water temperatures fall below 60 degrees F, bullhead fishing is all but over in Iowa. Their metabolism slows and the need for food decreases. An occasional bullhead will be caught by ice fishermen, but the catch rate is so low that bullhead fishing is considered non-existent during winter months and the bullhead fishermen must patiently wait for another spring.

*Mayhew, J. (editor). 1987. Iowa Fish and Fishing. Iowa Department of Natural Resources, Des Moines, Iowa. 323 pp.

here's some more form a Michigan angler who has a site with Fishing Tips

In the winter, bullhead catfish partially bury themselves in the mud at the bottom and go into a semi-hibernation phase. If you want to eat bullheads in the winter, you’ll probably have to freeze some in the fall.

Though a few horned pout can be caught through the ice, it's not usually worth trying in the winter. Bullheads are extremely inactive in cold water and will not cooperate. Of course, if you're in the deep South, such as Florida or Texas, bullheads could bite (or even spawn) all year round, so you're in luck.

I'm still looking for the premiere summer bullhead spot in the metro where I can let my girls loose to catch some.

I bet they guys on Pool 4 who "Catch Flatheads" while jigging winter walleyes have probably "Caught Bullheads" too. sleep

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  • 1 month later...

Just nailed a nice 1.5lber yesterday! Was out with the dog fishing for panfish in about 8ft of water. Kept seeing a big mark around 5-6ft, but it would never bite, but did seem to move a bit. Thought it might be weeds or a pike. Even caught several gills while the mark was there. Tried by it again and it finally Bit! Sure created a ruckus coming up the hole.

full-39012-53456-bullhead.jpg

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