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Walleyehooker

GFCI outlets not working

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I have 4 gfci outlets in the garage that have lost power. Breaker in box seems OK but still no power to outlets. Ive had my RV plugged into one of them lately and Im wondering if that over loaded them or did something. Any ideas?

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Possibly. If the breaker is on and you are sure you have power at the GFI then the GFI is most likely bad. Check for power at the breaker as we find them bad from time to time, Next go the first receptacle in that line and check there. Most likely that is the GFI and if you have power there replace the GFI. Also be sure to reset the GFI as sometimes they reset really hard and you must push the button with a screwdriver as the figure is too soft.

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I'm not an electrician, so I don't have this stuff memorized, but I think that it's generally a bad idea to have a refrigerator plugged into a GFCI receptacle.

My recollection is that the compressor turning on and off can occasionally trip the GFCI, which is especially bad in a fridge because you might not notice for a few days and your food spoils.

Also, the purpose of a GFCI is to protect you against electrocution... which is less of a risk of the receptacle is hidden behind a fridge (i.e., you aren't going to be touching it anyway).

I'm posting this in hopes that a real electrician will comment.

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Generally accepted standards allow the fridge to not be GFCI protected to prevent your food being ruined. If the outlet is not accessible without moving the fridge then you would be fine changing out that outlet. The other item in the garage that should not be GFCI protected is the garage door opener.

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I don't have a 2014 NEC codebook handy, but the 2011 code did allow refrigerators in kitchens to not be on a GFCI outlet or circuit.

Although the same 2011 NEC code did away with the exception that allowed oulets behind freezers or refrigerators in garages to not be GFCI protected.

All receptacles in garages are now required to be GFCI protected, with the exception of some specific snow melting equipment.

Arc Fault Circuit Interruption (AFCI) is another thing which I do not have the newest code to look up.

The general direction of the code appears to be making all 120 volt receptacles in dwellings either GFCI or AFCI protected or in some cases both.

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