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2012 Pheasant Brood Survery reports


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More info found here: http://gfp.sd.gov/hunting/small-game/pheasant-outlook.aspx

2012 Pheasant count up from 2011

PIERRE, S.D. - Annual August pheasant brood counts in South Dakota indicate that the statewide pheasant population is up from last year, and that should equate to an excellent pheasant season this fall.

Results of the survey show that pheasant numbers grew in many areas of the state, due in large part to a mild winter and ideal weather during the nesting and brood-rearing season.

The pheasants-per-mile index for 2012 is 4.21, up 18 percent from the 3.57 index of 2011.

"The mild winter of 2011-12 was the boost we needed for pheasant survival and reproductive potential," explained Jeff Vonk, secretary of the South Dakota Department of Game, Fish and Parks. "It goes to show that, with the combination of good habitat and the right weather conditions, pheasants can be quite prolific.

Much of the improvement in the pheasant counts came from areas of the state that had a good habitat base.

"Pheasant hunting will be good across most of the state, with the traditional pheasant range once again providing excellent hunting opportunities," Vonk said. "More than 1.5 million pheasants were harvested last year, and our counts indicate that this year will be another exceptional year for pheasant hunting in South Dakota."

Gov. Dennis Daugaard said the pheasant survey is good news for the state.

"Pheasant hunting is important to the economic well-being of South Dakota, and it also helps support the strong outdoor heritage of our state," the Governor said.

The 2012 Pheasant Brood Survey Report, complete with comparisons for the different local areas, can be found online HERE here.

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  • 2 weeks later...

its starting to look more like late October/early November in the SE part of the state. Lots of crops coming out now mostly corn but I have seen a few beans being combined also.

Its making me go stir crazy, because with the sights and sounds it looks and feels like bird hunting weather but still have to wait a bit yet. I decided to go shoot trap tomorrow just because I can't take it anymore and I need to get out and put some holes in the sky lol.

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  • 3 weeks later...

the farmers are going to town. The local news last night said right now, corn is 36 percent done and beans 47 percent done.

as far as forecast, dry, dry and more dry. Not even a hint of rain. I am supposed to hunt some private land for opener, and from what I am hearing unless it rains we wont be hunting. Its so dry any vehicle traffic is a high risk for fire so lots of guys are keeping things off limits.

I just had 160 acre fire down the road from me last week. started from sparks from the train. going to be an interesting fall once hunters start getting out and traveling off roads in trucks and atvs.

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I just had 160 acre fire down the road from me last week. started from sparks from the train. going to be an interesting fall once hunters start getting out and traveling off roads in trucks and atvs.

Was it a corn feild? That is my father-in-laws feild. He wasn't real happy to say the least.

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yup, just off HWY 106. I was out of state when I got news of it. I believe there were 35mph winds on top of that and I got kind of nervous. Sounds like they had it under control and were prepared for the worst.

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update on the harvest:

Quote:
Agriculture officials say ideal weather conditions in South Dakota have pushed the row crop harvest far ahead of last year's pace and the five-year average.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture says in its weekly crop report that 55 percent of corn for grain has been harvested, ahead of the five-year average and last year's mark of 6 percent. About 96 percent of corn was in the mature stage.

Seventy-nine percent of soybeans had been harvested, ahead of the five-year average of 16 percent. Sunflowers were 14 percent harvested, compared to the five-year average of 1 percent.

haven't had any rain, and not a sign of any significant rainfall in the forecast either.

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I just put 2 fairly large fire extinguishers in my hunting tote.. with everything dry, its gonna be harder than hell on the dogs also.(and IM not talking about scenting conditions) My young dog is layed up already from ramming a corn stalk up her chest.

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Some CRP was hayed or grazed, but they were limited to haying 50% or less of their CRP. Also, many farmers did not hay their CRP due to the paperwork involved and the hay being of low quality and low yield. There certainly is some CRP that was hayed, but not a significant amount by any means.

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Having been out west of Mitchell on 5 out of the last 8 weekends. I'm going to go on record as disagreeing with you creepworm.

What Im seeing, is that almost everything that could be hayed, was. Ditches, sloughs, crp, pastures that didnt hold cattle etc. Theyre still cutting out there, irregardless of the quality or weight of the hay..

I'm looking for very "compressed" public opportunities this year.

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At least in the Pierre area if it could be hayed it was hayed. There is a fraction of the cover as there was the last couple of years. The public will be terrible a week into the season as much of the crops are already out.

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The Aberdeen area was the area I was talking about. There is some CRP that was hayed, but not a huge amount. Just about all the road ditches were hayed, which is pretty normal. There is still plenty area to hunt. The only public land that was effected by this was some of the walk in areas. I will say that the further you west you head from Aberdeen the more CRP that was cut, but still, it will not effect public land much, only private land was able to be cut.

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The only public land that was effected by this was some of the walk in areas. I will say that the further you west you head from Aberdeen the more CRP that was cut, but still, it will not effect public land much, only private land was able to be cut.

It will effect public land big time in the central portion of the state where almost all of the public land is walk-in. Most walk-in areas are CRP acres. Landowners were allowed to hay 50% of their CRP even if it is walk-in and most did just that. There will be ton of hayed walk-ins in central SD.

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It will effect public land big time in the central portion of the state where almost all of the public land is walk-in. Most walk-in areas are CRP acres. Landowners were allowed to hay 50% of their CRP even if it is walk-in and most did just that. There will be ton of hayed walk-ins in central SD.

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few observations I have made the last couple of days.

I have been roading my dogs daily about 6-12 miles depending on how warm it is, usually just before sundown. We haven't had many bird encounters until this week and its really jumped.

Now that crops are out, those birds are scrambling to find any bit of cover they can. In my area the ditches are mowed, and the sloughs and cattails are no longer holding water because of the drought. Most of these are chopped down now (probably will meet the plow/disc now soon too).

I found birds in the smallest of pockets and thinnest of grass last night just going down the road on the atv. The old theory about "the nose knows" proved me wrong again last night on more than one occasion. Some of the birds that were pointed gave me a real good chuckle because I would have never expected a bird to be there.

I am going to try and get out and scout some land this weekend while out for the youth hunt and get my dogs on some birds. Cooler temps are getting me ready.

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