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ted4887

Good beginner fly-rods

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Okay guys, as I have posted before, next summer will be my first year trying out fly-fishing. I went trout fishing down in the SE part of the state late last summer, and had a complete blast with it. Decided it is a sport i'd love to do more often. Well this weekend I want to go out and check out some fly rods and reels. I'm not overly concerned with the reel right now, as from what i've read, they are mostly just line holders. But as far as the rod goes, what would be a good starter rod?

I only drive a car, so I'm thinking a nice multi piece rod is the way to go. Any specific lengths I should look at? I would like to stick with fishing small-medium sized trout streams.

Any tips are appreciates.

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My first fly rod was a 8 1/2 ft 5 wt. They are pretty versitile. They can handle larger flies and fish. I have caught anything from small sunfish to large bass on that rod. It works great on small and large trout streams.

As far as brands go, you can get anything from beginner rods to high end models. I've had good luck with the cabela's brand rods. It just depends on what you want to spend.

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as far as rod wt. and length goes i agree, an 8 1/2 ft. 5 wt in a 4 pc would be a good choice. as far as brands go, cabelas, redington, and temple fork outfitters all are great starter rods, cabelas has a great travel rod called the stowaway, this would be a good option. look for the crosswater or red fly rods by redington, tfo are a bit pricier but quality is unsurpassed. they also offer alot of option and price ranges.

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Great info so far guys. I stopped into Cabelas this weekend and browsed around. DOes anyone know of any stores in the metro or southern MN regions that offer lessons, or let you practice casting? Keep in mind, this will be my very first time doing this.

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Go to The Fly Angler (same place as Thorne Bros in Blaine). They can help you find what you need. Other than that, the guys at Cabela's are pretty good too. Just ask them about casting and see if you can test cast a rod. They'll be more than happy to sit back and cast instead of sitting at behind a counter wink

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First, don't worry yourself into a snit over this. Any basic 9' fly rod of decent quality will be just fine. You can cast a fly line with a broom handle, a willow branch or your bare hands, as I have done to prove my point to students.

Go to Cabela's and buy an entry level 5 or 6 weight. Get a decent DT line. Put a leader on it and go play. It will all work out. And don't implode your mind with TOO much information. You best lessons will come from YOUR efforts waving that rod around. Then, when you see what a fly rod and line do go get some guidance from someone who actually KNOWS what they are talking about.

Have fun. Maybe I'll be across the crick from you next spring.

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Someone starting out tends to be hard on a fly line...popping, snapping etc. which soon creates cracks etc at tip end; with a DT ya got TWO ends to wear out. A DT can be used either dry fly or nymph fishing and, in my experience teaches a new angler a better "feel" for how the rod loads/unloads. I WF just loads it quicker and a guy can always get one after the basic casting strokes are down.

It's no big thing either way; just my preference for someone starting.

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I got one of Cabela's packages from their HSOforum, had it delivered to the store for no shipping cost.

I've been supremely happy, it's a 4wt... 7 1/2 foot 2 piecer? I just wanted something to play around with chasing sunnies. It's been fantastic, my only wish was that I'd gone with a longer rod and perhaps a 5 or 6wt to throw some slightly bigger flies.

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That's the package i'm getting as well. I am going with the 4pc 5wt in 9'. Was there anything else that you needed to purchase outside of the package to get started?

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Nope, you've got everything you need in there. I really like the quality of the case that comes with it, very good deal IMO.

I did pick up fly tying materials and learned to tie a few patterns that the gills chomp down on pretty hard. I also ended up fishing enough that I needed an extra tapered leader, but I think it comes with an extra already?

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Yes, I believe it does.

In your opinion, how hard is fly tying for a beginner, as i'm assuming that you just started as well. I think that maybe after my first season, I will give it a try.

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All you need for panfish are a few simple tools (bobbin, thread, vise, hooks, foam, rubber legs). You can pick up a fly tying kit for ~60 at gander (or you used to be able to).

Tying is expensive to get into, so maybe just buy flies at first. Flies made with foam and poppers will stay together the best. Dubbed nymphs and things tied with feathers will fall apart the fastest.

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Perhaps I was a bit to blunt. You CAN theoretically break the tip section of ANY weight rod and still use it. The 5-wt. then works better as a 7-8 wt. Break the tip section of a 9-wt. and you have a nice rod to throw an 11-wt. line.

But to suggest that a 9' 5 wt. rod is the best for a beginner because beginners break rods is a bit much.

It is nice you are willing to help with advice though.

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I picked up a Redington RedFly 2 in a 4-piece 5 weight for Jr. for Christmas. Seems like a fairly well-constructed rod, the reel appears acceptable and Jr. is excited to try the thing out.

Why do we bother buying rods for Christmas anyhow? Now a guy has to wait months to use the darn thing!

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Ufatz, you realize you are disagreeing with me even though we suggested the same size and wt rod? I merely added that a 9 foot rod is still long enough to use if you break the tip and that it wouldnt absurdly stiff or short for a beginner to handle. Get a life aside from criticizing other peoples suggestions, i feel bad even dignifying your comments with a response.

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Why do we bother buying rods for Christmas anyhow? Now a guy has to wait months to use the darn thing!

Actually, i'm planning on giving it a try once the weather warms up for winter C&R season smile However, I probably won't become very proficient with it until it warms up and I can get out more regularly.

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Dale, I did not suggest a perfect beginners rod-you did. And my major disagreement was your assertion that a 9' 5 wt was an ideal beginners rod because if you broke it you could still use it. Of course you could. But using your logic a 12 wt 9' rod would also be ideal, because when the beginner broke it he could still use it.

It makes no sense to say a 5 wt. 9 rod is the ideal based on your assertions. Having taught a few thousand people the rudiments of flyfishing I can also say that I doubt most new flyfishers break any more rods than us old timers.

You could as easily have suggested a 6 wt 8 1/2' rod or a 3 wt. 7' rod or a 10 wt. 10' rod. See my point?

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ted4887

I was at Cabelas (Owatonna) on 12/30 in the bargen cave they had the bag and all the gear in it for the Prestige outfit, chest pack, Retractors, floatant,forceps the packful. For $8.91.

Up front they have some LST rods left in 4 and 5wt I think they were 7.5 or 8 foot. There was a Reddington in the cave.

I work in Mankato so once the wether warms a bit I could help you with a few casting tips.

I would say to start A 5wt 8.5-9foot long get a good nymphing line and a cheap DP line one size larger (6wt line for a 5wt line). It will load your rod with less line out and make getting the feel easier. Learn the roll cast first. you will use it the most.

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Comit 2, thanks for the help. I also was in Cabelas that day, as I was in Waseca for work, and figured "why not?". I had recieved the prestige pack 9' 5wt as a gift for xmas, so I'm set for the rod now. Now I need to get out to a parking lot and practice casting. I also stopped at BPS and picked up a few packs of leaders.

I think I am now just excited for 'Trout Day' to get here, so I can get out and chat with some people that know what they are doing in person. This youtube video thing is getting old! lol

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I know what you mean. Boy do I need an open water fix!

One thing to remember is it is a lot easier to cast a fly line from water. It is almost impossable to roll cast with out the line in water. You need to have the stick of the water to to help load the rod and keep the line from moving on roll casts. So look for a small pool or open water to cast from.

Check out some single hand spey casts on youtube the single spey is a great roll cast to use.

Get a pair of waders spring time is a great time to use a flyrod for panfish.

Winter trout season is open on some streams.

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That's my next step. I tried some on this last weekend at Bass Pro, and didn't really care for any of them. They felt cheap. I am thinking about the Cabelas Dry Plus pair. Any thoughts or experiences with those?

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