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zelek

Trimec Classic

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I thought I'd try some Trimec on the black medic and other weeds I got taking over my lawn. Does anyone know how much of the stuff I should mix per gal of water?? Thanks!

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Well...surely someone who's used this often has a mix that's a little more specific than that.

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What's that supposed to mean? The label on the package reads, Use 1.2-1.5oz per 1-6 gallons of water per 1000 sq ft. Higher rates are meant for higher volumes.

So, if you're putting it in a 3-4gallon hand sprayer, use 1.5-3oz per fill. Yes, this is how much to use. If you're mixing in a 10 gallon or 25 gallon sprayer on an ATV then you can bump up the mix a little. However, middle of summer is not a good time to be out spraying weeds. Most weeds are more affected by herbicides in the spring or fall. Especially difficult to control weeds.

I have used this and other trimec products during my several years working for a nationwide lawn service. I wasn't trying to be sarcastic. Mixing rates are right on the label and they are usually right on when used at the right time on the right plants.

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Well...surely someone who's used this often has a mix that's a little more specific than that.

Zelek -

Powerstroke stated EXACTLY what you're supposed to mix at.

If you cannot read the label yourself, Trimec Classic Label , he was helping you.

If you cannot follow directions, then you should probably hire the job done.

The listing is on the bottom of the second page, right side.

If you're not sure what you're doing, it'll be cheaper to hire the lawn to be sprayed, than to replace the lawn if you burn it up.

More chemical is not always better.

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Zelek, Powerstroke's second post, the one after your second inquiry, is as informative. The label instructions leave a lot of leeway for mixing because there are a lot of factors that go into which ratio is best for your specific application.

The pros can take a look at your lawn, the types of grass in it, the species and concentration of weeds, the overall health of your lawn, etc., and come up with a mix that falls within the label concentration range and fits your situation and the volume/equipment you are using to do the job. But they can't really do that in an online forum, except to list all the possibilities. smile

I think you may get a decent weed kill if you mow, then water heavily for a day or so, wait another day and then spray. That way, even though it's moving into the middle of summer (not quite there yet), your weeds will be more inclined to grow, and of course it's a growing weed that is the most easily killed weed.

I tend to run toward the lighter end of the label recommendation range. I used Trimec products quite a bit 15-20 years ago, but haven't for a few years now.

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Zelek -

Are you going to be using a hand sprayer? Or one that gets pulled behind an ATV / garden tractor?

What the label means by 1.2 - 1.5 oz for 1-6 gallons is for a handheld / backpack sprayer.

If you're using a 1 gallon sprayer, you would put 1.5 oz in the gallon of water.

If you're using a 6 gallon backpack sprayer, you could put up to 9 oz of chemical in the backpack sprayer.

If you're using a pullbehind sprayer, the biggest issue you're going to have to do is calibrate your sprayer. The reason for calibration is, because without knowing how fast you're going or how much water you're using over your lawn, you can't determine how much chemical to use.

Too much chemical and you're going to risk burning your lawn.

Too little chemical, and you're basically spraying contaminated water with little effect, wasting your time.

The summer spraying isn't so much about burning your lawn, but rather risking vaporization.

This is where the chemical vaporizes before it can be absorbed by the plant, then causing a gas to form which easily drifts onto non-target plants, such as bushes, flowers and trees and causes damage.

A friend of mind did this earlier this year, and if you ever go to Famous Daves in Forest Lake, see all the red mulch, it's because I had learned a hard lesson years ago.

That area used to all be grass.

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