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Big Brown

Lindy Rig Basics

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In my limited fishing experiences I have never attempted to use lindy rigging as an approach to the elusive walleye. Everything I have read suggests that this is a killer approach.

I guess I am looking for basics of setting up and fishing this way.

Any help is always appreciated.

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This is a great web page for learning to tie snells, http://dns.advnet.net/mkg/Article/HowTo.htm

I wish I would have learned this a long time ago instead of buying them for $2-$3 a pop and not getting exactly what I wanted.

Basically you have a slip weight, you should check out the foam walkers here on the site, they attach to your line and then you attach the weight to the end of your foam walker, then you have a snap swivel, which you can connect your snell to. Your snell length can vary depending upon how far off the bottom the fish are and how fast you will be trolling.

Another way is to use 3-ways, with the weight to the bottom and then the spinner ring behind that.

Check out the infiltrator kits also available here, this will be a great addition to making your own snells.

Good luck, it is really pretty simple.

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fisherman2.gif

[This message has been edited by Grabs (edited 08-07-2002).]

[This message has been edited by Grabs (edited 08-07-2002).]

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big brown

getting a feel for the bite is an exciting part of fishing lindy rigs. timing can be key, too. often ole marble eyes will just lip the bait and play awhile. knowing how long to let 'im run can be the key to hooking fish. i know a few old timers that would drop the line when they feel the bite, then open a beverage and take a few sips, or light up and take a few puffs before reeling up and setting the hook. you'll definately get the touch, and will find it a productive way to chase the eyes....

good luck...

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Northeast Outfitters
915 Hwy 29 N NE
Alexandria, MN 56308
(320) 763-9598

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On lindy rigs, Can you have it 50 ft or so from the boat trolling or is it better to have it right under the boat?

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Guest

Depth, is my key as to how far back a live bait rig should be set. The deeper you're fishing, the closer to the boat. As far as how long do let them have it, I like to let a running fish stop before setting the hook. Even on windy days you can see your line being pulled away from the boat. After it stops, close your bail and set the hook. If after letting line out I don't see the line going out, I like to hold my line until it tightens up. When your line tightens you should feel the fish pump, then I like to let a little more out then close my bail and set the hook. This takes practice to feel the fish before it feels you. If I get one of those wet rag bites, I like to hold my line until the fish pumps it. If you have a good soft tipped rod you can feel the fish before it feels you. Not all bites are the same, some smack it, some just start pulling away, some just hang on and swim with the boat. It's all about experience to be able to tell the difference between a weed that is bending as you're moving and a walleye that is swiming along with the boat.

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The lindy rig is a very productive way of fishing,but I can't help thinking that it's hard on the fish that you want to release. Letting the fish run with the bait and then setting the hook. Quite often the fish has it down in their gut. Fishermen are finding dead eyes with two or three lines hanging out of them on Leech lk. Any thoughts?

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A few things to remember or try when fishing with a lindy rig or any type of live bait rig. Many times when watching other boats rigging you will see the old cast and drag routine. This can and does work at times but I have found that in water deeper then 10ft a different approach works better. I like to fish a 3/4 Ounce slip singer or more. I use this heavier weight to constantly check for the bottom. With the extra weight I can fish my rig vertically and the checking for the bottom, gives it a jigging motion. I do not drag or hold my sinker on the bottom, just check to make sure I am near the bottom. With todays graphite rods, super lines and flourocarbon leaders you can feel the smallest hit.

Earlier it was mentioned that lindy rigging results in more deep hook sets. This can be true, but can be true with any type of live bait fishing. There is no rule on how much line to give a fish. The rule I use is to let the fish determine that. If the fish are slamming the bait and I am able to drag them, I set the hook. If I am getting a lot of short sets and loosing fish I will give them more line. If you are routinely deep hooking fish, try giving less line or no line at all. Again, let the fish determine how much line you need to give. However, as long as you are fishing with live bait, you will occasionally get a deep hook, it happens.ScottS

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Guest

Dead fish with two or three lines?

I would venture to guess that they died from being played out two or three times, and not from leaving a hook in.

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Well how long does it take for a hook to rust out of a walleye?????

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Big Brown, Check out the Foam Walkers in the store. These are the best way to go for Lindy Rigging. Less snags, Less Hassles, more options, and more fish smile.gif Good luck. Bruce Mosher

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Bruce Mosher,www.icebusterbobbers.com

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Be sure to pay close attention to small details. Sometimes snelled lindys work better than ones tied with a trilene knot.
When I use lindys I normally use a colored hook. Also try adding a bead or two.
Finally make sure you experiment with leader length sometimes it may take a 12 foot snell to caox them.

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