Jump to content
  • GUESTS

    If you want access to members only forums on HSO, you will gain access only when you Sign-in or Sign-Up .

    This box will disappear once you are signed in as a member. 😀

  • RECEIVE THE GIFTS MEMBERS SHARE WITH YOU HERE...THEN...CREATE SOMETHING TO ENCHANT OTHERS THAT YOU WANT TO SHARE

    You know what we all love...

    When you enchant people, you fill them with delight and yourself in return. Have Fun!!!

Sign in to follow this  
slick2526

Rate the Lakes

Recommended Posts

Hello everyone, in your opinion what would be your top 5 picks of lakes to fish in minnesota, the species, and why? If you would like to narrow it down into a certain area, go ahead. Just looking to see what people think.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think mile acs has a good number of descent sized walleyes and trophy class walleyes. Thats why that would be my walleye pick.
Crappies- Had to pick upper red lake. That big body of water has been going hot for a while with some of the nicest crappies around this region. Hope it stays this way.
Also minnetonka for bass. I have had great luck out there just fishing for 2 weeks when I come down to this area in the mid part of summer. If its going good for bass then, Im guessing its great in the fall.
Not very much logic huh lol grin.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Basswood – walleye. Very beautiful, not too much traffic. Fairly easy lake to fish.

Mille Lacs – walleye. Close to home. Good fishing

Minnetonka – Panfish. Close to home, great fishing. Many fishing options.

Kabetogama – Pike/Walleye. Beautiful. Great camping.

Cokato – Smallmouth. Lots of action and lots of big fish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

You ask for five, but if I do that, I'd have to list 10 or 15. So, I give you one --

Leech Lake -- where else do more eagles soar? And, name your prey and you've got a good shot at it. You can deep water fish with downriggers in Walker Bay, or throw lures at bass in Headquarters where you have to search to find any water over 8 feet deep.

You can cruise miles of timbered shoreline without a human structure, or you can boat into Walker for lunch. You can fish off Bear Island knowing the last engagement between the US Army and Native Americans took place there. You can listen to loons or watch pelicans.

You can fish Leech with regularity knowing you cannot live long enough to really learn the whole lake. You can sneak away into private corners where you won't see another boat. And, if you've shared Leech with loved ones, you can reflect on previous experiences. You can love Leech, but you know she must be respected, as she can turn on you in a moment.

In the fall you can watch the sun target turning leaves amidst the always green Norway and white pine.

Leech, for me, stands alone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

×