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Powerstroke

How to get homeowner permission?

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I just wanted to know proper ways to ask for permission from landowners. Inever done it before and I'm more or less teaching myself to hunt and this is something that sort of freaks me out. I ususally hunt alone and I have no dog to hunt over so its always been slow going.

What is proper ettiquite? WHat's inappropriate?

Any help or suggestions for the newbie?

ANybody looking for a hunting partner? I'm a great shot! wink.gif Live in the SW metro. I hunt upland, waterfowl and firearms deer. I've never taken a grouse, but I've done ducks, pheasant and deer with consistancy.

[This message has been edited by Powerstroke (edited 10-03-2004).]

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The main thing is to put in the time. Basically just knock on doors, be polite, and don't be dressed in hunting gear, just your casual or business casual clothes.

One successful thing I've done is offer to volunteer services, such as stacking hay, mowing, whatever, for a day in exchange. Explain what you said above, you are by yourself, and also explain that you don't do damage, you pick up your expended shells, etc.

Now, back to the time thing. It can take a great deal of time to do this. If you're like me, it ends up being too much time. There is a similar post on this site which goes into much greater detail, but in a nutshell, every farmer I've approached has been extremely polite and friendly, but 9 out of 10 have an excuse as to why you can't hunt there. Most of the excuses are "my relatives hunt the land and they would be mad" or "someone has leased the land (either through a broker or directly)".

But, IF you put in the time, you will find willing landowners. I just didn't have that much time to put in after trying for several years, so I ended up leasing land and have been doing it ever since, much to the chagrin of myself and also many hunters on this site; all of us don't want to see that trend continue, but I'm of the opinion it is almost a lost cause at this point. It's a shame, but it's a fact, if your uncle/grampa/brother/cousin-in-a-half-law/whatever does not own land you are "hooked up" with, it's a really hard time finding private land to hunt.

I will point out though, that Minnesota has millions of acres of public land...no permission required...but another story there as well...

------------------
Jon Keller
******* Tackle Field Staff

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Wow, I just noticed they censored out my signature line. What's up with that? I've been out of town for two weeks, strange things going on here...

Anyone have any insight?

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I think I remember reading in that thread before about acquiring permission, but now I can't find it. If someone can show me that'd be cool.

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On Satuday two of my hunting buddies and myself went out and spent the day asking farmers to hunt thier land for deer hunting. We always hit the land that we have been hunting for 5 to 10 years first. It's always nice to start with some "I remember you, sure you can hunt, just close the gates behind you." Then we hit up the other places that we find. As stated above, most of the land owners are real nice and want to talk for some time. Don't be in a hurry to just ask and run. Interduce yourself, tell them what kind of hunting you want to do and when. Most want to know ware you are from and how many people are hunting with you and if you've been hunting in the area the last few years. It's always good to drop thier naghbors name when talking to them and let them know you can hunt on there land as well but want to get some other land if someone is already hunting it when you want to hunt it. I ask them about there crops and how the farming season has been. If you ask a few questions and just listen they will tell you everything that has been going on all summer long.
If they let you hunt you may want to send them a Christmas card and a gift like a tin of nuts or something. They will remember that when you see them the next year and you will almost always get a "yes" from them to hunt again.

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The fellas have hit the nail on the head. Be polite. And remember that you will be remembered. If you trash someones land, leave gates open, etc...you won't be back. Leave it better than you found it and most landowners will let you hunth thier land.

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I agree with everything already said above. I think the owners first impression of you is everything. If you show up dressed clean with a decent vehicle that has been taken care of, it may give the impression that you would also respect the property owner and their land the same way. Most owners that give you permission have nothing at all to gain by allowing you permission. Leaving ruts in a muddy field with your truck can be all it takes for the owner to say "no" next year. I always try to surprise the landowners with a little token gift every year. I have brought fresh Krispy Kreme donuts for a farmer that is always up early milking cows. If I notice a few empty beer cans around the house(for example), I take note of the brand and make sure to bring them a case of "their brand" once in awhile. I try to avoid paying them cash because I feel they appreciate something that I took the time to do for them. It just seems too easy to hand them cash. If I shoot a deer, I stop over during the holidays with some suasage, jerky etc. made up into a nice gift box. Make sure to look them in the eye and tell them that you really do appreciate it since hunting and being outdoors is one of your greatest passions. As stated above, I have also stood and talked for hours to owners that are just happy to have someone to visit with for awhile. I actually enjoy it and they do too! Good luck!

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One thing I think a lot of people over look is to invite the land owner to come along and hunt. I realize it is not feasible for bow hunting but other types of hunting could easily be done with an additional hunter. You might be surprised by some of the answers you get. Give it a try!

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TheGuy has it pretty well nailed. I haven't done a lot of asking & generally have known the people, but if not I try to find out if anybody I know, know's them, to have common ground. I usually call them first as it seems to me that just showing up in someone's yard unannounced isn't always taken positively, but that depends on if I have a connection. If I don't have any connection, I'd be more likely to just stop in & chat about it, that gives them a chance to see what kind of a guy you size up to be.

It seems like turkey hunting, bow hunting, or even muzzle loader hunting are good things to start with, to build a relationship. There's a lot less of us that do those things & many landowners that already have gun deer hunters, will still let people bow hunt. There's also a lot less danger of wild bullets flying around for them to worry about too. You know you're not that type of guy, but they don't. Asking someone about gun hunting for deer right off the bat, is definitely the toughest way to try to get on land. Maybe even try small game, or ducks or something.

The other tip I have, is try to get access to some land, that's maybe got potential, but doesn't appear to be prime. Chances are there's few people interested in it & you might find one really good stand location on it, but it won't support 2-3 or more hunters. One guy, only needs one good spot per property or maybe two guys take one good spot & one very marginal one & alternate. If you're talking about deer hunting, there's some deer almost everywhere.

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Once I've established a relationship with a farmer, I also try to stop by during the summertime and talk to them. Another rule I have is to never, ever stop them when they're on their tractor, they're busy, I'll wait til later. I've given out venison sausage, birdseed, gift certificates to show that I appreciate the privilege of hunting their land. I have to admit, I don't do enough door knocking, its time consuming and humbling, but I just need to do it - having that extra 400 acres to pheasant hunt on is worth it!!!!

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