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dwag70

3 pt rule

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The guys I hunt with (private land)are trying to deceide if we should have a rule of 3pt or 4pt on one side on all harvested bucks. I think the rule would be nice let the forks live and grow bigger. Take all the does we want. What do you guys out there think of rules like these. We hunt 90 acres and are going to try and recruit the others around us. Will it work on 90 or abondon it if it is only us.

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dwag70,
Our neighbor and our hunting camp have agreed to let the smaller bucks walk and let them grow up. The problem we have is there are 2 other camps that aren't too far from us and they shoot anything that walks by their stands. Now that is their right, as long as the antler length is legal but we believe it sure limits us to having any of these little guy's grow up into big bucks!!!

The biggest problem I have is to hear them talk about how they "filled out", I love the taste of venison as much as the next guy, but I also love to watch a big buck come down the trail with his nose sniffing a doe's behind more.

Another problem we've run into, in the past, is road hunter's, we've had a couple of "conversations" with a few of them and they no longer drive up and down the road by our shack with an uncased gun and a 12 pack between them on the front seat of their truck.

Ole

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jlm,

You're right, I'm sure I'll get my backside chewed out about how I'm trying to impose my thought's on someone elses rights!!!

Maybe I should have just bit my tounge.

Ole

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Nothing was directed at you Ole, sorry if I gave that impression. I just know how this topic usually turns out! Lots of passion when it comes to big bucks and deer hunting! I am going to stay out of this one and watch in enjoyment!

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We do 8 pts minimum on our 120 acres.

Just our own personal opinions, and our neighbors have no interest to join in.
Kinda stinks, but I have no right to tell them what I want them to do.

We started it 3 years ago, and in the last 2 seasons we have taken 3 nice bucks. Last year I got a 124 inch 8pt. Not huge, but the biggest I have ever shot by far.

90 acres may not be much, but if you choose to pass on some bucks, at least they have a chance to live. Shooting them all, gives no chance.

Also this year, we have planted 7 different food plots, in hopes to maybe hold deer close by for longer periods, versus just cruising through and getting whacked next door.

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We have numerous other camps by use including on that have over 15 people in it. I realize what is going to happen over there. they will fill the freezer. (there right) I think all opinions can be expressed and no one should take offense.One exception to our rule if it goes through is that all the young hunters will be able to take any deer for the first 2 yrs they hunt. Get hooked so we can keep them coming. I am not a trophy hunter and have shot quite a few deer over the last 17 yrs but I still get shakey when the big one comes walking by. I do feel that to fill the freezer it does not have to have Horns to make it in there it looks and tastes the same when you pull it out HOPE I AM NOT RUFFLING ANYONE FEATHERS ON THIS ONE

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By the way the land butts up to State Forest(some hunting pressure) and there are some aeras that tax forfieted
but there are still 8-9 camps close by and we might be able to talk the guys to west of us to join? (120 acres)...but the other two sides will not join in..

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Dwag, I have a feeling if it's only 90 acres your plan may not work. I'm no expert by any means but from what I think I know about deer is they have a pretty good sized territory. If you can talk your neighbors into doing the same you have a much better chance.

For the record I really don't want to upset anyone, but myself and the guys I deer hunt with arn't out for the big bucks. The areas we hunt are our own land. We bring our kids with us. I probably get more shakey than anyone else on the planet when I see Mr. Big coming, but that isn't why I'm out there. For us it's getting meat, having fun, and teaching the kids.

The whole shoot em from the truck really bugs me. I hate it when people do that junk.

Good luck this fall to everyone.

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90 acres in kinda small for your plan if it adjoins other good woods/land that is being hunted hard. About the only way it would help is if you didn't hunt it and the deer had a haven from the guys hunting around you.
QDM takes a good piece of land owned by one or several pieces owned by many in agreement which is not easy since it is completely voluntary. There are a milion different arguements from each side but as long as it's voluntary and legal every single person gets to make their own decision how they want to hunt.

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Boilerguy,
I understand your point. The nice about this rule is the exception for the kids. We are not gettin' any younger and can use the new recriuts to the sport. It is alot of fun to come back to camp and see the smile of a 12 or 13 year old that just got their first deer

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Dwag, I totally hear ya. My youngest boy shot his first deer last year. Sure, it was a little bigger than my dog, but it was his first deer and I don't think I've ever seen the little feller so happy. My oldest boy shot his biggest deer the same day. It was a 4x3. I don't know which kid was smiling bigger. It's these kinds of days that remind me what it's all about.

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Dwag,
I hunt in a group of about 11 and we hunt private farms in southeastern MN. A lot of the people that live in the area don't shoot the smaller bucks. I have shosen not to shoot small bucks even though some of the guys in our group shoot anything they can. I just think if I let it live there is a chance. The more people do that the bigger they will get and the more there will be for the next year.
There will always be those that like to shoot anything and those that will pick what they want to shoot. With the numbers of deer we have in MN I think that is just fine. Our group talks about it and it is about half and half, we let each guy do what he wants. We are not down there to just shoot deer, we are down there to have fun with our relatives and we have a blast every year no matter what we shoot!!
Some guys just like to shoot holes in the sky!! They never get a deer. What do you guys think about those hunters?

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I would like to propose we stick to the question and the reason this topic was opened, versus making this a big whining topic. I am not raining on the parade, but too often the topics are lost in follow up issues.

The original question is in regards to personal choice QDM of sorts, and what our experiences may be to help out in the area of interest.

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BIG TROPHY RACKS are for the wall.

Does are for the freezer.

All others bucks just need time to become BIG TROPHY RACKS so they can assume their rightful place in infamy.

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So then, if we have 90 acres of private land and numerous acres of shared land that recieves some pressure but not heavy(most camps hunt close to there camp) is it a good idea to start a QMD program on limited land. There are pockets that are inaccessilbe land that can serve as a haven to deer. If the neighbors across the road join us, the total acerage could be 210. but if not we are back to the 90 original acres we know the rule can be enforced. would it work???

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As I stated earlier, 90 acres isn't much, but you gotta start somewhere.
A small dead buck can't get big.
If you guys are serious, pass the small ones, and hope they make it to see one more year.(or two)
If you want meat, take the does.

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I say why not try it out for a couple years with your party. You will still be able to take does for the freezer if you wish. Maybe you'll see some results, maybe your neighbors will notice bigger racked deer. Might be enough to convince them to join in. Or it might not. Guess you won't know unless you try.

Doesn't make sense for me to shoot a forkhorn or spike for meat when the DNR is letting us buy 5 management tags for antlerless deer in my zone.

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I just picked up a roll of film from a trail camera.

47b4d635b3127cceb41b8fc7dc950000001610

dwag70,
If you let em live, they can get just like him. I am pleased to say, it is very possible he is a buck we have passed for a couple years now. The photo on line is a bit fuzzy, but on my picture, I think he has 11 pts.
He's a shooter in my book. Bring it on.

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Nice photo biglakebass!!! I'm starting to get the lust!!!!

I think Suzuki said it best - "as long as it's voluntary and legal every single person gets to make their own decision how they want to hunt."

I'll pass on small bucks early in the archery season but by mid-November, if I don't have a doe in the freezer already, that good tasting forkhorn will be going down.

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As others have indicated above...90 acres isn't all that large when you consider the area or range that those deer may be traveling. However, once again as stated above, you have to start somewhere and if you take out that 1 1/2 year old buck it obviously won't have a chance to get larger.

I would be careful in your thinking of setting up a 3 or 4 point/side rule. You may not be accomplishing what you are setting out to do by still shooting 1 1/2 year old bucks. Chances are a good portion of those 6 pointers are 1 1/2 year olds and I have seen plenty of little "basket racked" 8's that are 1 1/2 year olds as well. These deer may have the best chance (genetics) to be trophy's in the future.

Maybe incorporate a width element into your points. Wide as ears, almost as wide as ears, etc. Basically trying to differenciate between a 1 1/2 year old and a 2 1/2+ year old.

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I think the comment about size is right on. A majority of the yearling bucks I see are at least 6 pointers & several are little 8's. The wide as the ends of the ears or close guideline, seems like a decent indication along with head width of knowing if the deer's at least 2 1/2. You can't always tell that if you're shooting at a running deer or taking a longer shot picking an opening in trees or something.

I shot at a doe last year shotgun hunting, thought I had missed, & then shot at the yearling doe behind her & dropped her. They were running through trees & brush & I was shooting in 10-20 yard openings. When I got down there the yearling doe was a 6 pointer, oops. Incidentally I could then see that I'd gotten the real doe as well.

I agree 90 acres isn't much, but I'm trying to do the same thing on my own 50 acres & also the neighbors 70, which I basically am the controlling hunter on. It only amounts to 25-30 acres of woods, but if a small buck gets in there during the 1st weekend in our area, which gets probably 75% of the pressure, it's got a really good chance of making it. If just one little basket racket stays there for two days or even one of them his odds of making it go way up.

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We hunt 40 private acres and probably an additional 300 state. We cover at least 300 total with our 8-9 member party. We started passing on all bucks smaller than 6 pts about 3 years ago. (no bucks taken since) We do have a clause to the rule.. Any whom have not taken a buck may shoot any buck. The rest of us have taken enough forks in our lives where we would like chances at something nice. I feel that (like some have already said) if you pass on a small buck it no doubt increases it's chances to become a large buck. You shoot it and there is no chance. I say it can't hurt. I am hoping qdm will start to pay off soon. Like BigLake.. We are starting some plotting this year as well. Cant wait!!

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      Bluegill - Fair: Get back into the standing flooded timber out of the wind; look for fish to be in 6 to 8 feet of water. Maybe a little shallower on the north side when it’s sunny. Black Crappie - Fair: Still are out in deeper water; they should start moving in shallower if the weather calms down. Skunk River (Coppock to Mississippi River)
      The river is off the boat ramp parking lot at Brighton and continues to drop. Level is still above flood stage. Wilson Lake
      The fall trout release is scheduled for Oct. 27th at noon; 1000 trout released with 200 tagged for prizes. Rainbow Trout - Good: One week to go!  For more information on the above lakes and rivers, call the Lake Darling Fisheries Office at 319-694-2430. Central Park Lake
      The lake is full after the renovation project; fingerling fish have been stocked.  Coralville Reservoir
      The lake level is at 711' (normal pool is 683.4') on 10/18. This is the crest height; the lake is predicted to slowly start falling after the weekend. Diamond Lake
      The lake is at normal level, but is still a little muddy. Minnows are not allowed here. Bluegill - Fair: Use small worms or jigs tipped with worms. Black Crappie - Fair: Anglers are catching fish off the jetties. Jigs tipped with worms work best. Most fish are 8-9 inches.    Kent Park Lake
      The lake is currently drained for a lake restoration project.  Lake Macbride
      The motor restriction is off; any sized motor may be used at no-wake speed (5 mph). Water temperatures have been in the mid 50's. The fish cleaning station at the primitive campground has been shut down. Black Crappie - Fair: Use jigs or minnows over brush or rock. There are a lot of 12 inch fish right now. Walleye - Fair: Troll crankbaits in 8-14 feet of water. The shallow water bite should pick up along windblown rock especially towards evening. Wiper (Hybrid Striped Bass) – Fair: Try topwater baits early and late then troll during the day.  Pleasant Creek Lake
      The lake is still about 1 feet low. The fish cleaning station is closed. White Bass – Fair. Wiper (Hybrid Striped Bass) – Fair. Bluegill - Fair: Fish along weed lines in 7-9 feet of water. For more information, contact the Lake Macbride Fisheries Station at 319-624-3615.   Lake Keomah
      Bluegill - Fair: Use small jigs tipped with live bait near shore and around the fishing jetties. Black Crappie - Fair: Try a jig tipped with a minnow around deep structure. Try different depths until you find active fish. Channel Catfish - Fair: Use stink bait or chicken liver. Largemouth Bass - Fair: Cast the shoreline with spinnerbaits or crankbaits. Try a rubber worm or a crawdad imitation around the fishing jetties and along the dam.  Lake Miami
      Largemouth Bass - Fair: Cast crankbaits or spinnerbaits around the cedar tree piles and the fishing jetties. Try also rubber worms or other plastic along the rip-rapped shorelines and in the cedar tree piles. Bluegill - Fair: Use a chunk of night crawler along the fishing jetties or around the cedar tree piles. Black Crappie - Fair: Try jig and minnow combinations around the cedar tree piles.  Lake Sugema
      The south boat ramp off of Highway 2 has been reopened. The north ramp is now closed due to a construction project.  Largemouth Bass - Fair: Cast the shorelines with crankbaits and spinnerbaits. Use crawdad imitations along the rip-rapped shorelines and the fishing jetties.  Black Crappie - Slow: Try different depths with minnows and jigs until you find active fish. Drift or use a slip bobber and a minnow. Bluegill - Fair: Try live bait tipped on a small jig around the shorelines and fishing jetties. Keep moving until you find active fish. Walleye - Slow: Use a nightcrawlers rig or a jig and minnow combination along the dam.  Lake Wapello
      Channel Catfish - Fair: Use chicken liver or night crawlers; look for areas with some water flow. Largemouth Bass - Good: Cast spinnerbaits or crankbaits around the cedar tree piles. Try crawdad imitations along the rip-rapped shorelines. Bluegill - Fair: Cast small jigs tipped with a chunk of night crawler around the aquatic vegetation. Black Crappie - Fair: Drift or troll jigs tipped with a minnow in 6-10 feet of water.  Ottumwa Park Pond South
      Trout will be stocked on Friday, Oct. 26th at 11 a.m. Rathbun Reservoir
      The current lake level is 912.07 msl. Normal operating elevation is 904.0 msl. The lake has risen over 6 feet since last week, so be aware of floating debris. Lake Rathbun has zebra mussels, so make sure to properly drain, clean, and dry equipment before transporting to another water body. Channel Catfish - Fair: Use night crawlers or chicken liver in coves or areas with some water running into the lake. White Crappie - Fair: Try minnows around structure. Look for submerged trees and stumps.. Wiper (Hybrid Striped Bass) - Fair: Troll crankbaits along rocky shorelines and around rock piles. Follow the gulls as they will be where the schools of hybrid striped bass are feeding. Try also vertically jigging spoon baits around rock piles. Walleye - Slow: Use night crawler rigs or jig and minnows around rock piles and submerged points.  Red Haw Lake
      Largemouth Bass - Good: Cast the shorelines using rubber worms or spinnerbaits. Black Crappie - Fair: Use tube jigs along the shorelines; try tipping the jig with a minnow . Bluegill - Fair: Use small jigs tipped with live bait along the shorelines and around the fishing jetties. Channel Catfish - Fair: Try night crawlers or chicken liver around the fishing jetties and the outer edge of the lily pads.  The district includes Mahaska, Lucas, Wayne, Monroe, Appanoose, Wapello, Davis and Van Buren counties. Contact the Rathbun Fish Hatchery at 641-647-2406 with questions about fishing in south central Iowa.   Mississippi River Pool 16 Fishing Reports
      Tailwater stage at Lock and Dam 15 in Davenport is 16.21 feet and has been falling this past week. Flood stage for Lock and Dam 15 is 15 feet. Many of the boat ramps are inaccessible due to the high water. The ramps at Marquette St, Credit Island, Clark's Ferry, Shady Creek, and Fairport are all under water. Fishing has been slow with the high-water conditions.  Mississippi River Pool 17
      Tailwater stage is 16.92 feet at Lock and Dam 16 in Muscatine and has been falling this past week. Flood stage at Lock and Dam 16 is 15 feet.The ramps at Big Timber and Kilpeck are closed due to high-water. Fishing has been slow.  Mississippi River Pool 18
      Tailwater stage is 19.19 feet at Lock and Dam 17 above New Boston and is falling. Flood stage is 15 feet. The Toolsboro landing is closed due to high water. The Hawkeye Dolbee ramps will be underwater. The Ferry Landing is closed. Fishing has been slow with the high-water conditions.  Mississippi River Pool 19
      Tailwater stage is 15.26 feet at Lock and Dam 18 above Burlington and is falling. Flood stage is 10 feet. Fishing has been slow with the high water conditions. River stage is still above flood stage throughout the pools. River levels have been falling this past week. Most boat ramps are under water due to the flooding conditions. Fishing has been slow with the high water conditions. If you have questions on fishing Pools 16-19, contact the Fairport Fish Hatchery at 563-263-5062.
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