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TUMBLEWEED

Arrow Shaft/Fin Selection??

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I am new to the bow game (just got a Nova).
I see there are a ton of different shaft
diameters and fin styles to choose from.
How do I choose?? Anyone have some basic
info to pass on to me??Thanks.....

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Try using the Easton shaft selector guide. It's available at the Easton Archery web site. It's really a great tool for learning and understanding why a paricular shaft should be used. If your still not sure you can go to your local pro shop and they will be glad to help you out. Being a feather user I don't have any experience with vanes.

[This message has been edited by metrojoe (edited 08-28-2003).]

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metrojoe, gave you good advice, go to eastonarchey dot com and/or the local proshop. Basically, it boils down to a formula using your draw length and poundage that you shoot at to select an arrow, and also what kind of bow/cam you shoot. The aluminum arrows get bigger in diameter and bigger in wall thickness, with a lighter arrow shooting faster, and the heavier arrow giving better penetration and durability. I would recommend that you not get too hung up on speed, it gets tougher to tune your bow. Look into the carbons too, the price has really come down on them, they're comparable to aluminum in price. I bought carbons last year for the first time mainly for the durability, if you bounce an aluminum arrow off your archery butt, its shot, where carbons can take some abuse. And it still went right thru a deer last year. If I ever go elk hunting, I'd probably go back to aluminum, just for more weight and kinetic energy and penetration. One more thing, the lighter arrows shoot flatter with less arch, which makes judging distance less critical.

Good luck.

[This message has been edited by BLACKJACK (edited 08-28-2003).]

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TumbleWeed, take Metroes advice and use one of those fancy selector deals. And if you can, go to a dealer that will let you test shoot some different shafts. When I got my carbon Xpress shafts last year, all the charts indicated the 300 shafts. Found out the 400's shot much better with the 125 head. Dropped down to a 100 grain head and the 300 and 400's were about the same. Dropped to a 75 grain head and 300 shafts are better.

If you want to get the most out of your bow, then everything needs to be taken into consideration. Draw weight, # grains in tip, # grains in the insert, # grains in vanes/feathers, # grains in shaft which of course differs with identicle shafts cut at different lengths. You can make it as much of a science as you want, or just build up the basics.

There was a great site that I just found regarding bow tuning tips, about what makes the bow faster, more accurate etc. its www.thebowman.com

Feathers are more forgiving and lighter then vanes, aluminum used to be more forgiving than carbon, verdict still out on if they still are. etc.

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Thanks for the pointers!! I just stumbled on
to the Easton site. I will have to go in
and be fitted at the bow shop. I got the
bow from a buddy who is upgrading to a
nicer bow. I am able to hit the target
fairly easily now, but want to explore
more into the whole aspect of the sport.
Thanks again......T/W

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