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mnorth

we are 'the leading edge' I Share on HSO
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About mnorth

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    IceLeaders.com Family
  • Birthday 11/08/1964

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  • Location:
    wright county
  1. mnorth

    The gun.

    Weatherby Vanguard.
  2. Another source with pics.. http://www.smoked-meat.com/forum/showthread.php?t=3970
  3. This maybe a start.. http://www.theingredientstore.com/foodpreservation/refrig_smoker.htm
  4. I would also like to purchase a parcel of land that is attached to State land. My question is..can Tax forfeited land or County owned land be purchased by a private party at any time?
  5. mnorth

    Looks like N.D. is giving in

    The Latest... Spirit Lake tribe's warning: Expect 'far more severe' consequences if nickname retirement work continues In a statement released by the Committee for Understanding and Respect, which has been authorized by the Spirit Lake Tribal Council to speak for the tribe on the nickname issue, the committee warned UND, the State Board of Higher Education, the NCAA and the Big Sky Conference to stop acting “against our honorable name as given to UND by our ancestors.” By: Chuck Haga, Grand Forks Herald Fighting Sioux nickname supporters at the Spirit Lake Sioux Tribe responded angrily today to remarks Wednesday by UND President Robert Kelley and Grant Shaft, president of the State Board of Higher Education, who advocate repeal of the state law ordering UND to retain the nickname. In a statement released by the Committee for Understanding and Respect, which has been authorized by the Spirit Lake Tribal Council to speak for the tribe on the nickname issue, the committee warned UND, the state board, the NCAA and the Big Sky Conference to stop acting “against our honorable name as given to UND by our ancestors.” If they don’t stop working to retire the name, they should expect consequences “far more severe than any sanctions UND claims will exist by keeping our name,” according to the statement. The committee also suggested that Kelley and Shaft should resign their positions for failing in leadership. Frank Black Cloud, a spokesman for the Spirit Lake committee, said he was “not at liberty to say” what the “more severe” consequences might be, except that they likely would include legal action. “It is something that definitely will let them know we are serious,” he said. The statement also disputed Shaft’s suggestion Wednesday that Notre Dame’s aligning itself with the Hockey East Conference rather than a new conference that will include UND may have been influenced by UND’s being placed on sanctions by the NCAA for retaining the nickname. Shaft made the comment after Kelley’s address to a gathering of civic and business leaders on campus Wednesday, in which he called for the Legislature to repeal the law adopted earlier this year mandating UND’s continued use of the Fighting Sioux nickname and logo. Kelley said the ongoing controversy threatens UND’s entry into the Big Sky Conference and problems in future athletic scheduling and recruitment, and is damaging the university’s national reputation. Shaft, who was present for the address, said afterward that Kelley’s comments were “spot on.” But in its statement today, the Committee for Understanding and Respect accused UND, the board and others of playing games with supposed consequences of resisting the NCAA, which since 2005 has worked to eliminate the use of American Indian names, logos and mascots from member institutions. “There is the real truth, and then there are those things they wish us all to believe are consequences,” according to the statement. “Since we have never been allowed into the discussions about our ancestor’s gift to UND – our name — we have no choice but to go with the truths we know, and we know our proud name has not hurt UND for over 80 years. To suggest otherwise is hostile and abusive, and borders on racism.”
  6. mnorth

    What kind of bow do you have?

    My 1st and only bow "Darton Lighting" Yup, still love it
  7. mnorth

    Sioux Mascot

    As of Today 6/3. UND's Fighting Sioux nickname transition office to close in mid-June UND’s yearlong process of transitioning away from the Fighting Sioux nickname and logo, ordered suspended last month by the State Board of Higher Education following legislative action on the nickname, will formally end on June 15. The transition office in the Carnegie Building on campus will close and Robert Boyd, a former vice president for student affairs named by President Robert Kelley to lead the transition effort, will end his assignment. “We’re preparing the files and information we collected for archiving, for historical purposes,” Boyd said. “If retirement of the name and logo once again becomes an issue, there will be evidence of what did take place this round.” The North Dakota Legislature in March adopted a bill requiring UND to retain the Fighting Sioux name and logo despite a State Board of Higher Education directive to UND to retire the symbols by Aug. 15 to comply with terms of a legal settlement between the university and the NCAA. The athletics association had threatened sanctions against UND and other member schools that did not eliminate nicknames, mascots and logos based on American Indians, calling such imagery hostile and abusive to Indians. Attorney General Wayne Stenehjem sued the NCAA on behalf of the university and the state board, and a 2007 settlement gave UND three years to win authorization from two namesake tribes to continue use of the symbols. The Spirit Lake Sioux granted such authorization through a referendum and tribal council action, but no such approval came from the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. On May 9, citing the legislative action, the state board directed Kelley to halt the transition process. Boyd said he is “in full agreement” with the decision to close the transition office, and he planned to send out a “briefing” memo perhaps as early as today to advise members of two transition task forces and others who have followed the work. “We went through a year of fairly intensive work with no controversy, and I’m very proud of what we accomplished,” he said. “We had people involved who obviously would have preferred the transition not take place, and I understood and respected that. We tried to be as inclusive as we could be and to respect all points of view, but we moved ahead and I’m sure we would have met the Aug. 15 deadline.” As transition officer, Boyd supervised the work of two task groups, one assigned primarily to document and preserve the history of the Fighting Sioux name and logo and one to guarantee that the transition took place openly. The history group included community members as well as UND students, faculty and staff. They had begun planning the identification, collection and display of documents and artifacts relating to the name and logo when the transition was suspended. Kelley had anticipated a third task group, which would have been asked to develop new symbols for UND athletics and other activities, but that group had not been established. Finding sincerity on both sides Boyd said he leaves the transition office still believing that the university and state board were right to begin retirement of the Sioux name and Indian-head logo, though they are revered by many — as evidenced by the overwhelming email campaign that helped persuade legislators to enshrine them in state law. “What I could always clearly identify with was the distraction to the university that took place because of the controversy,” Boyd said. “As sensitivities grew on a national basis, it became more and more apparent that our institution was going to be viewed in ways that I felt very hard to accept,” he said. “I feel very passionate about this place, and to be poked fun at, to be demeaned because of this controversy, was very hurtful.” He said he could “clearly understand the concerns that people felt, particularly students who said they felt demeaned or harassed” by the pervasive “Fighting Sioux” presence on campus. He said he had no doubt of their sincerity. “At the same time, I had students for whom I had equal respect who wanted very much for the name to be retained — American Indian students as well as non-American Indian students,” he said. As a UND administrator, especially in recent years, Boyd said he “kept running into the distractions, the time it was taking from my office, the time it was consuming of the president,” whether Kelley or his predecessors. “Those were efforts and resources we very much wanted to place elsewhere.” He said he’s also concerned “that our wonderful student athletes will be caught in the middle of this,” as the state-NCAA standoff means the controversy “maybe will grow in intensity.” He said he has spent the past two or three weeks preparing transition files and looking for documents that were often cited during the past year but not physically produced, such as actions taken by various governing bodies following a 1992 UND Homecoming incident. In that incident, often cited by nickname opponents, several children dressed in American Indian regalia and riding on a homecoming float sponsored by UND’s American Indian Student Center were said to be taunted by some students. “Some students very thoughtlessly made fun of them, and it created quite an incident,” Boyd said. “President (Kendall) Baker had a series of forums on campus to talk about it, and the students involved apologized,” but it still left a bad taste. “It was probably the most significant incident in recent times that highlighted
  8. mnorth

    Deadliest Catch

    Russ was on K.Q. one morning while in town for the Sport show. I believe he mentioned he was on the Kodiak this year.
  9. mnorth

    Is this a bobcat?

    Thanks...Pics sent
  10. mnorth

    Is this a bobcat?

    I have a couple of pics that I would like to share. I just got them from my camera in Nisswa. Can I send them to a email to help me post ?
  11. mnorth

    Fish House TV Antenna

    Maybe try a new location. I have a Ice Castle at the cabin that sits on lower ground, well I had to move it this past weekend to remove some trees and put it up the driveway on higher ground and now I get a much better reception. It's not great but maybe 75% better than what I was getting. Also maybe try and extend the antena up higher someway.
  12. mnorth

    A cautionary tale

    Well, It's been almost two weeks since I downloaded the link that Paul had sent, "Thank You Sir" and at this point it seems to be running better. I also made a short cut to the Link that Dbl had sent and will use that as a backup if I need. Again ..Thanks Guys for 'chiming in" for this problem.
  13. mnorth

    A cautionary tale

    Thanks for the info guys.. I appreciate the help. Along with all the photo's from you all.
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