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Steve Foss

Boreal, part one: Some VERY tough customers

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Hey all:

We know it takes a rugged toughness for wild things to survive in the -40 winter of the boreal forest and the -70 of the lower black spruce bogs.

But usually we're talking about animals and birds.

Plants have to be just as adapted to cold, and perhaps even more adapted, because they can't run/fly to warmer locations when the frigid temps hit. Black spruce/sphagnum bogs are hands down my favorite micro-environments in the boreal forest. My photo excursion clients know this first hand, because we've slogged through our share of them together. The relationships between all living things in these bogs are intricate and mysterious. We cannot hope to explain them. But we can find great reward trying, because the photo opportunities are endless. smilesmile

And as I begin (continue, really) a project of documenting them that may take the rest of my lifetime, you'll see more images like this, and landscape images, and bird and animal images. Occasionally I'll dip into the archives to bring back images that simply say boreal. If God grants me the time and the finances, this project will become a book of images and essays. If not, they will exist only here, for you who share this site.

The two in this post are examples captured this afternoon of last year's growth from plants that have wintered frozen under a blanket of snow and ice but have not lost their vitality. This is not new growth from our early spring. The first image shows mosses, and a vining plant with individual leaves much smaller than my pinkie fingernail. The second image is of Labrador tea near burned out wood.

Did I say tough? These plants are TOUGH! gringrin

Canon 30D, Canon 100 f2.8 macro, iso100, 4 sec @ f32, tripod, remote shutter release, mirror lockup, diffusion disc to kill harsh sun.

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30D, 100 macro, iso100, .5 sec @ f32, tripod, remote shutter release, mirror lockup, oversized diffusion disc to kill harsh sun and prevent breeze from moving the subject

3474742976_45b1e8c797_o.jpg

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Those are fantastic as usual Steve. I can't wait to see the continuing stories. The second one is my favorite by the way. It's incredible how the color stands out with the burnt background.

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Well, Steve, these images are wonderful - as usual. They feel warm and intimate. I, for one, am honored that you choose to share not only your images, but your writing as well! The boreal forest is an amazing place and one that many of us only have occasional opportunities to visit. Your contributions certainly enrich my visits and understanding of that area. They also make me appreciate and enjoy photography and the outdoors in general, whether I'm in a suburban nature center or at our cabin on the shores of a northern lake.

Thanks, Steve!

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What country did you say these came from? smile

Ahh, you busted me. I lied. These are all pirated images from the Siberian taiga. I can't get anything past you guys! gringringrin

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Very, very nice stuff, Steve. Easy to overlook and underappreciate, unless you take the time!

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Nice story and images! The world through the eyes of a macro lens are pretty amazing.

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