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Da Beak

Garage Floor?

14 posts in this topic

I need your help/opinions here guys.

We are looking at having a storage shed or garage built this summer. Some where in the 26 x 30 range. It's mainly going to be used to store the boat, lawn care equipment, 4 wheeler etc...

A friend had told us that we don't want to put a slab in the shed, but rather leave just a Red Rock floor. His reasoning behind this was according to him, tires don't deteriorate or rot as fast on red rock as they do on concrete.

Has anyone else ever heard this or is he just blowing smoke? crazy

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If the rotting was true wouldn't we all be having issues with our car and truck tires in our garages?

If a slab is in the budget, go for it. You will have a much nicer shed in my opinion. You will be able to sweep up debris and power wash things without turning it into mud.

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like walleye guy said wont all the tires rot?? hmmmm.im building a shed for my 4 wheelers and other stuff and im going with slab for sure.i guess if your worried about your tires rotting i guess you could always block your wheeler up.but i see no reason why you should.

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If the rotting was true wouldn't we all be having issues with our car and truck tires in our garages?

If a slab is in the budget, go for it. You will have a much nicer shed in my opinion. You will be able to sweep up debris and power wash things without turning it into mud.

I agree WG. And this was the argument I posed to him.

They were big into boating a number of years ago, and they used to keep their boat at a marina on the St. Croix. According to the boaters who were "In the know" "you always store your boat on a Red Rock floor. Otherwise you need to block up the trailer." And like I said, I'd never heard of this before, and I was wondering if anyone else ever had.

And yeah, a do want to put a slab underneath it for the very reasons you mentioned.

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In the past, tires sitting for extended periods of time on concrete would get permanent flat spots. Newer tires that sit may get a flat spot but after a few miles of driving will dissappear.

Concrete holds moisture and that moisture may want to gravitate(for lack of a better word) to the tire. The freeze/thaw of that moisture and the actual moisture itself damages the tire, thus shortening the life. Newer technology tires greatly reduce this but don't totally eliminate it. To prevent this throw a chunk of rubber or that pink styrofoam used for insulation between the tire and floor when storing.

The reason why it doesn't happen to your daily drivers, is just that, you drive them more often, they get a chance to remove what little flat spot they got from sitting and also get a chance to heat up and dry whatever moisture got into them.

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Its a good idea to block up tires if they are stored for an extended period of time. easier on the sidewall where the "flat stop" would occur. when storing my fishouse for the summer i always crank it down and block the tires up, cover them from the sun.

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I am not a painting the floor fan myself (it looks great if kept perfectly clean, but a lot worse than plain jane concrete if it is dirty or dusty) but that's just me.

I slanted my floor in two garages about 2.5" from back to front, over the span of 28'. Just enough for water or dripping/melting snow ice to head towards the door, but not steep enough to notice while walking. Just a though.

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A friend of mine has a collectible car that is stored all winter. I dont know if it makes a difference or not, but he puts about an inche of sand down under the tires.....

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hey da break i would say put in a floor i build building for a living and if you dont you will have rodents in there and maybe they will chew on your wires and everthing else dont listen to who ever told you that

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I need your help/opinions here guys.

We are looking at having a storage shed or garage built this summer. Some where in the 26 x 30 range. It's mainly going to be used to store the boat, lawn care equipment, 4 wheeler etc...

A friend had told us that we don't want to put a slab in the shed, but rather leave just a Red Rock floor. His reasoning behind this was according to him, tires don't deteriorate or rot as fast on red rock as they do on concrete.

Has anyone else ever heard this or is he just blowing smoke? crazy

well Here is something for you consider since no one else brought it up.. Red Rock = What? that red stuff left over form all those mine dumps up there? That Stuff makes a great base for a slab,, but being an ex-ranger what i would consider is this ,,you like the red all over your stuff when you drive down some of the roads up there? Or How about what you may track into your house or boat ,, So if It was Me,, i would go with the slab,, Put a layer of plastic under the slab and it will do a little to stop the moisture problem

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Would'nt painting the floor with an epoxy paint seal it and eliminate moist from coming through?

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put 2" of pink styrofoam under the slab, that will help with the sweating in spring. if your storing for extended period of time it wouldnt be a bad idea to place some sort of matt under tires.but as others have said i dont think tires rotting would be a huge problem.

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