Guests - If You want access to member only forums on HSO. You will gain access only when you sign-in or Sign-Up on HotSpotOutdoors.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
cupper

Battery Problem...

12 posts in this topic

Last night I topped off my batteries with distilled water and gave them a good charge. One of them must have been filled too high (I thought I didn't over fill, but I was wrong apparently) because when it was charging the water/acid bubbled over. Now I have a mess in my garage. I put baking soda down to neutralize it. My questions are...

1.) Is my battery ruined? It's a Trojan I just bought last year for $150.

2.) Is there anything else I need to do for clean-up other than get rid of the soda that was put down?

Thanks for any help you can offer. I was always told to check water levels in the battery... when I checked last night they appeared to be at about half. Obviously I am not an expert at this type of thing. Any advice anyone has for keeping batter levels at a good point would be appreciated.

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your battery won't be ruined from overfilling. Use a straw to remove the extra water. Insert straw, put your finger over the end and transfer to a container. Repeat till the level is correct.

A low level in the battery is what you want to avoid. You don't want the plates exposed to air. During charge and discharge will lower the fluid level in the battery. Check the level every other charge and you shouldn't ever have a problem.

Clean up. I would sweep up and dispose of acid soaked baking soda. I'd then make a paste of water and soda and work it into the area. If you can hose it off without getting the acid all over then do that after the paste has had time to neutralize the acid.

Even with the correct type deep cycle charger I get one battery that'll mist during a charge. I can see the residue on top that battery. I'll wipe it down and charge the battery on the ground outside.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks alot ST... I really appreciate the advice.

How far should the acid level be from the top for a properly filled battery?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Its got to cover the top of the plates. I go mid way from top of plates to the battery case. I would guess that to be about 1/4-1/2" above the plates.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with Surface Tension. Keeping the plates covered is very important. A battery will heat up while charging and this will cause the water inside to evaporate so it's good to check the level periodically and refill as necessary.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks alot ST... I really appreciate the advice.

How far should the acid level be from the top for a properly filled battery?

Some batteries have plastic that sticks down inside. You want to fill with distilled water so it touches the bottom of the plastic and it looks like a cats eye.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Distilled water. Why? Well because it lacks the minerals that tap water has and those minerals will like air, become deposits on the plates inside the battery. You can buy distilled water or you can make your own. Hmmmm, make your own eh? Yep use the water out of your dehumidifier.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The fluid in the battery expands as the battery charges so if you have it full cold, there is a good chance it will boil over when you charge it.

The instructions on my first onboard charger (the only battery charger instructions I've ever read) said to add enougn water so the plates are completely covered. Charge the battery, then add more water to bring it up to the proper level.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I read the exact same thing (on my on-board charger instructions) as PatK said. By doing this you will avoid the boiling over effect, mess and cleanup.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Check out a product called Thermoil Demister to help with misting problems on batteries.

[Note from admin: Edited. Please read forum policy before posting again. Thank you.]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

cupper, while ST has the right idea (and alot of surplus time to kill grin ) for lowering your cel levels... a 'turkey baster' liberated from the kitchen works very well. If you happen to have an 'over-protective cook' in the household, they also can be bought for like $1.50 at the supermarket. Phred52

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can also use one of those little battery testers with the floating plastic balls. They pull some liquid up from the battery and depending on how many balls float, it will tell you the charge level of that cell. If there is too much elecrolyte in that cell the tester can be used to remove just enough to set the level correctly. Check the local auto store and they should have them,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Posts

    • LH...I repaired Shimano's for years, and this was a huge issue for the Stradics and the Sahara's, First, look at the bail and make sure that they are not out of alignment. I bet your problem is caused by one part (and it's the probable cause of both problems)..... To keep the bail from rotating on the cast (and snapping shut on you in mid-cast) there's a small friction ring inside the rotor. It looks like a heavy rubber band only it's made of heavy vinyl plastic. It's  actually called a "friction ring". When it goes bad it loosens up just enough to bind up your reel completely and the bail won't snap shut. Also check the round bail return spring with the smal 90* bend in it, that can pop out of the tiny hole (the "bent" end) and cause the bail to do literally nothing. If your bail actuator pin (your :latch") is bent/worn, that will do it, but unikey that it's worn down that much. Loosen up the bail center screws, and see if when they are loose the bail will return. If so, they may be bent/out of alignment. Takes some careful maneuvering to get them back to proper set. I love Shimao stuff, but they never did own up to this problem, as far as I know. Check those things first and let's go from there.

       
    • Look at the diagram, order the parts.   If it pops open or won't close I am still thinking the spring... Take pictures with phone or digital camera as you take it apart.  Helps to get it back together. 
    • Wrong guy there.  I don't fish in MN anymore, don't have a boat either. 
    • Clinton.     After Mn coughed up 66 million for 150 jobs in Cook, nobody from MN ought to be criticizing Indiana.  Looks like they got a heck of a deal.
    • who hasn't done something dumb like that.  I know I have!   good luck making it up to you Mother!!
    • *sigh* Kiss of death my friend............. kiss of death.   LOL
    • make / manufacturer: Eskimo
      model name / number: Mako Upgraded to an electric auger and selling my old one. Runs great and has been well taken care of. Starts on 2-3 pulls every time. I have the extension for it as well as a new set of blades that I bought but haven't needed to change yet. I also have a cabelas auger bag that it fits in.
    • the thing that trips the latch is worn or broken.    i think   will take apart and look if i set hook hard the bail rackets pops up and lets line out won't close some of time...have to do manually
  • Our Sponsors