Guests - If You want access to member only forums on HSO. You will gain access only when you sign-in or Sign-Up on HotSpotOutdoors.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
charliepete

Campfire Grilled Fish?

15 posts in this topic

I'm looking for some outdoor cooking alternative recipes (besides breading and frying) for an upcoming fishing trip. I'll be pretty remote and cooking over a campfire or cookstove. Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you don't mind hauling garbage, then I would suggest aluminum foil pouches. Basically take however many fillets one person will be eating and put it on the bottom of a piece of foil, then put sliced potatoes and onions on top. Add salt & pepper and a couple of lemon slices and fold up tight so the steam doesn't escape easily. Throw it over some coals and you're good to go.

If you want as little garbage as possible just leave the skin on the fillets and throw lemon pepper or cajun seasoning on the flesh side and throw it on the grill. Campfire grilled fish is about as good as it gets grin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Grilling fish tends to dry it out. That is why it is recommended to grill fish on a plank that has been soaked in water.

If you are going to use the foil method, you may want to boil the potatoes until they just begin to soften then slice and place in the foil. I like to put the potatoes on bottom because they will brown and moisture will help steam the fish. The sky is the limit on what you can pour on top to make a sauce.

Check out the cooking fourm as there are a million ways to cook fish in there.

There is a lot of info on the

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i take sunnies and put them on a marshmellow stick with some salt and pepper cook till its flaky and YUM YUM!! this only works if the fish has been scaled with the skin left on.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I lay foil down, lightly cover with olive oil and the place the fillets on the foil (if you have skin-on fillets, place skin side down). It works equally good with skin-on or skinless fillets. Season the top of the fillet with your choice of seasonings (I prefer lemon pepper and garlic salt). Cook until fish flakes.

If you are grilling lake trout or salmon with the skin on, flip them over when they almost done and remove and discard skin. Then scrape the grey/brown stuff that is located along the lateral line as this is what causes 99% of the "fishy" taste. Turn the fish back over on the foil and lightly brown the bottom side on the foil/olive oil.

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like the foil method, easy to keep a folded piece in the cook gear. Works great for lakers, walleye. Lay the filets on the foil, add butter or marg, salt and garlic pepper. Seal well, best if two layers of foil (fold long piece in half.) Cook over the embers on the Bdub fire grate about 20 minutes and flip for another 10 depending on how much is in the package. Very hard to screw this up. I also like to add an onion sometimes some peeled carrots.

Or

For walleye, leave skin on filets. Score across many times with a knife on flesh side. Cover with butter/marg onion, salt and garlic. Grill skin down over coals until flakes. Helps to loosely cover with foil piece. This one scores very well with the ladies!

Can't imagine packing in a fry pan and oil...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know some people that like to pack in a bunch of oil and a pan for the BWCAW. I just wouldn't want the hassle. That, and if that oil leaked out into your pack or something like that, you become a bear magnet. I prefer my camping to be bear free!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Check out the new Field and Stream. Interesting recipe for butterflied trout cooked nailed to a board next to a campfire by radiated heat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I 100% suggest the foil method.

Use some oil(quality olive oil is always the best), and don't forget seasonings, whatever you prefer.

-------------------

AN ADDITION TO THE FOIL METHOD:

My dad likes to use soy sauce and nothing else. No oil , no other seasonings. Just soak a fillet in soy sauce and wrap it up and cook.

--------------------

KEEPING IT BASIC:

Of course there's nothing wrong with gutting a fish, skewering it on a stick(after stripping the bark off), and just cooking it straight over the fire like a hot dog. It's still popular in asian cultures to cook at eat fish right away like this.

--------------------

OLD-SCHOOL TROPICAL ISLAND BAKING:

This is a little bit time intensive but fun to try! Works great on a sandy beach by a river during canoe trips.

If you're fishing anywhere near a river with large(like multiple 10+ lb) rocks, gather up as many as you can, and build a fire under them. A BIG fire. The goal is to heat up the rocks as much as you can.

In the meantime, dig a decent-sized hole in the ground. Big enough to fit the rocks, wrapped-up fillets on top, and covered with a layer of sand.

Prepare your fish using any kind of foil-related method as mentioned above with oil and seasonings. The TRADITIONAL way is to wrap your fish in very large tropical leaves of trees, but seeing as we're in MN and not the Caribbean, that's a little less practical. Make sure the fillets are wrapped very well or else you'll get sand in your food.

Once the fire dies down, push the rocks, which are now VERY HOT, into the hole. Place your fillets on top. Cover with a layer of sand. There you are, your very own hand-made ground oven baking some delicious fish fillets.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

foil method is good as mentioned

a much easier (produces less trash too) is to just put a bit of butter in the pan and saute the fish (directly on the wood fire flames) with a little seasoning of your choice. The campfire smoke gives it a little extra flavor, gotta love it

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Foil method for sure with sliced spuds, onions, minced garlic and cayenne pepper.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I was a kid, we went on a little camping trip and decided to cook some fish like we used to see the outdoor guys and the indians do it on T.V. Get a fish, clean it, put a green stick through it and cook it over an open fire. Looked pretty good on T.V.

Well, we probably washed it in alge water, we must have used a green piece of pi$$ Elm to skewer it and made the fire out of Wolfsbane and poison Sumac and poison oak, cause that fish was the nastiest thing I had eaten up to that time!

You see survivorman eating lizards and scorpions and snakes and stuff cooked that way, they must be plenty nasty....I guess if you are in a survival mode, the stuff tastes like a good T-bone?

But, some of my more memorable experiences as a kid fishing the Mississippi river in north Mpls., with a friend and his dad, was fish cooked in tinfoil over an open fire like others have explained in previous posts. Small Smallmouth Bass and walleyes, man were they good!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't tried it yet, but a friend marinates his trout and salmon in 50% soy sauce/50% orange juice concentrate and then grills them. He swears this is the best way to grill them, so I'll be trying that this summer.

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't tried it yet, but a friend marinates his trout and salmon in 50% soy sauce/50% orange juice concentrate and then grills them. He swears this is the best way to grill them, so I'll be trying that this summer.

Steve

That would be fantastic, I'm 100% sure of it laugh

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Posts

    • I went through the same thing. I had ATV's at first then bought an RZR. It was fun but honestly the quality for the price is pretty bad. You can go up to a Can Am but then the price is even worse. So a few years after I sold the RZR I got the itch again but then started looking at the Wranglers and ended up doing that. I bought a 2006 with the 4.0 and after that and buying a used 6.6' plow I was into it for less than 13.5k and can drive it everywhere.   I have the hardtop on mine. I just take it off in the summer and drive it when it's nice. IMHO it's the way to go but you need to watch out for ones that are rusted out. I take the doors off, the top off and drive around sniping gophers, head to the lake or just cruise around. I like the 32" BFG KO tires.     
    •   What's a big guy like you going to do with a little SUV?  Your still keeping the truck to pull that new trailer right?
    • Good luck, have fun and stay topside this time of year.
    • Did you have to sand in between coats of lacquer? I was going to use a pre catalyzed lacquer for a little more durability, but it seems like it would take forever to get in all of the grooves. 
    • Some of the older ones had a 4 cylinder. Think the new ones only have a 6 now.
    • White pine needs bud caps to survive.     DNR had this publication you might find interesting managing_woodland_deer.pdf   Here is another link.... from extension   http://www.myminnesotawoods.umn.edu/2007/04/minnesota-woodlands-and-wildlife-strategies-and-species/   Balsam fir and spruce are good if we ever have another bad winter....
    • Our son has one... mid 90's vintage....   I think it is the 6, was there another choice?   Not very good gas milage...
    • Anyone have one of these or know the pros and cons about them? I was looking at side by sides but came to the conclusion if I were going to spend around 15K or so I would rather have something more road worthy with a heater. Was surprised what they want for a new Jeep so I would have to find a gently used one for that price. So I would like to know the pros and cons with the little older ones or what to look for and what not to. I'm sure a guy would want the 6 cylinder as I might want to put a plow on the front eventually if we ever get snow.
    • Feiders sittin just outside the top 12. Really cool to see him doing well this year. Didnt sound like he had much luck prefishing going into the last tournament or this one but hes doin a heck of a job when it matters. Would be sweet to see him fighting for another top 12 spot on saturday!   As for my fantasy team... not so good. I was having a decent year so far (except for tharp last tourney).
  • Our Sponsors