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Jari Razskazoff

Best Trolling Motor for Bass and Musky Fishing.

21 posts in this topic

I'm in the market for a new trolling motor. I bass, and musky fish primarily, with a little walleye fishing occasionally.

What would be the best trolling motor to pull a 18ft glass basstracker?

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do you go out when its really windy? i would say 60+ lbs any motor will do its just the lbs thrust that matters..

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We have a Maxxum on our muskie boat, what a PITA. Unless you like having your foot on the pedal all the time. My walleye boat I run a Power Drive, I like being able to pull spinners and control the motor from the drivers seat, My tourney partner put a Terrova on his boat last year and thats the cats meow.

If you can swing it look at a Terrova with at least the auto pilot, makes fishing fun again not having to always be on the pedal. My 2nd choice would be a PD. I would go as big as you can afford for power.

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You might also want to look at the Motor Guide Wireless series. For an 18' glass boat, I would use the biggest motor possible. Motor Guide makes a 75 lb. thrust, 24 volt model, with internal universal sonar. The wireless series also has a remote keyfob, similar to the MinnKota Co-Pilot system. There are two advantages to using the Motor Guide as opposed to the Minn-Kota. First is the price, which is higher on the Minn-Kota with similar features. Also, I noticed that Motor Guide is offering the wireless keyfob for free with a mail-in rebate. Like Esox said, the wireless remote systems that both manufacturers have are the best things since sliced bread.

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Consider the autopilot feature on the Terrova's or Power Drives. I can keep the boat going in the direction I want, which gives me time to untangle kids lines, change lures, clear weeds, etc.

I find I can hold a breakline much more efficiently with the Autopilot. If you need to change direction, just turn the motor with your foot pedal. It will self adjust to the new heading and prevent the boat from overturning. Just awesome!

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You'll want a 24 volt motor for a boat that size, and I assume you're planning to use 2 batteries anyway. For a Terrova that would be an 80 lb motor, for a PowerDrive that would be a 70 lb motor. Both should be great for your boat. As the others have mentioned an AutoPilot is a nice feature for controlling the boat, that way you don't need to be constantly running the motor with the foot control pedal.

CoPilots are nice depending on how you fish, but if you're doing a lot of casting and don't want to stop your retrieves (ie. muskie fishing) then the CoPilot isn't the best, because it requires you to use your hands to control the motor.

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Ok Ok... I'm an [PoorWordUsage], the boat is an 18ft Aluminium basstracker.... does that make any difference now?

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I would go with 65 or 70 minn kota v2 powerdrive with autopilot.

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CoPilots are nice depending on how you fish, but if you're doing a lot of casting and don't want to stop your retrieves (ie. muskie fishing) then the CoPilot isn't the best, because it requires you to use your hands to control the motor.

That's what is nice about the MotorGuide Wireless series. It already comes with a wireless foot control if you want to keep your hands free. The remote key-fob works with the same unit... even at the same time, if you wish, without any modifications or add-ons. You kind of have the best of both worlds with the MotorGuide Wireless motors...

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...the CoPilot isn't the best, because it requires you to use your hands to control the motor.

Not really. You can use the foot control or Co-Pilot simultaneously. At least my Terrova works this way.

If I were to rank options: 1) Power- as much as you can afford

2) Universal Sonar -much more (16-20 ft) info, than just one on transom.

3) Co-Pilot

4) Auto-Pilot - Great feature, but I don't seem to utilize it that much.

Good luck.

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I would go with a Terrova hands down over anything listed. Takes all the work out of running the trolling motor. You can add the co pilot to this also. I played with my buddies Motor Guide and wasn't impressed and I prefer the composit shaft of MinnKota over the metal Motor Guides. Just my opinion. For running breaklines or weed edges the Aut Pilots the bomb on the Terrovas.

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I played with my buddies Motor Guide and wasn't impressed and I prefer the composit shaft of MinnKota over the metal Motor Guides.

Your buddy must have an older MotorGuide. The newer ones, including the Wireless series use a composite shaft, which they claim to be more rugged than the competition. The shaft has a lifetime warranty.

I know it sounds like I'm being a spokesman for MotorGuide, but I'm really just a satisfied customer. I think the Minn-Kota units are nice and certainly a quality product. I think you just an equal product for less money when you purchase a MotorGuide. Just my opinion, I guess. There is one thing that does seem to separate the two either way. The MotorGuide Wireless series is just that: wireless. The foot pedal on the MotorGuide Wireless series is not tethered to the motor with a wire like the Minn-Kota units. It's a foot-operated remote.

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His is an 06, on a Lowe FM 185 at full power he could only pull 2.2 mph with an 80#+ motor, my 74# pulls my Alumacraft Trophy 175 at 3.4. Not saying MG is bad I just prefer MK. MK does have or has had wireless foot pedals to.

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I'd take a Terrova over a Power Drive. The pedal is about 1000% better on the Terrova versus the Power Drive.

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I love my Terrova, but would like the steering pad of the PowerDrive combined with Wheel speed control. I don't use the rocker control (left and right steering, similar idea to cable drive), and with my Fred Flintstone feet, I ofter hit thrust button when just trying to spin the motor left and rigth, sending me in a spin, esp. if thrust is way up. Might have to start using the rocker more. But the reaction time and speed of turning are worth the extra $$ IMO.

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Now you're starting to get opinions from all over the board so hopefully you can sort them out and figure out what you want.

About the foot pedals, I've used Terrovas and Powerdrives and personally prefer the PowerDrive foot pedal because it's smaller. Both work good, some guys like one better than the other. Unless the style or size of the foot pedal is an important point for you, either motor should suit you well.

I realize you can still use the autopilot or the foot control even if you have the CoPilot -- I was just trying to say that to use the CoPilot you have to use your hands. I'd rather run my motor with my foot. Personal preference and fishing style, some guys wouldn't be without their CoPilots.

Peronally I'm not a fan of wireless foot pedals. I've owned them in the past, I've used a wireless MG that was new last year. When they work they're great. I've also tried to use them when they won't respond to what you're doing with the foot control, or when there's a long delay and lots of beeping ---- even on the new one from last year. I find that very frustrating.

The big difference between the Terrova and the PowerDrive is the stow and deploy mechanism, MK redesigned it for the Terrova to make it easier to use. The foot pedal was also redesigned, and the Terrova has 10 more lbs of thrust in the 24 volt motor. I don't think there's any other differences.

For an 18 foot basstracket you could probably get by with a 12 volt 55 lb motor and battery .... but you'd just be getting by. I still think you'd be much better off with a 24 volt motor.

BTW both the Terrova and the PowerDrive have rebates on them right now, you can see the rebate details HERE if you haven't seen them already.

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The only problem I have with going to the 24 volt motor, means I would have to buy an additional battery for 100 bucks, and the new charger for about 200 bucks, so if I did my math correctly that would add an additional 300 bucks.... getting to be a pretty expensive peice of gear... ... . . .. . .

I think I'll save money and just deal with 55lb thrust, and probably get the Terrova... that seems to be a good all around choice.

Maybe I should just save money and get the edge... it seems as though a cable operated trolling motor would have less things to break.

Any input?

On another note, not to bash any companies, but I've been reading that motorguides customer service isn't what it could be...

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Cable operated motor will give you the giant foot pedal that is always on the deck --- powerdrive or terrova will give you a smaller footpedal and a long cord that you can move to the back or the middle of the boat if you want ... or even unplug and stow when you're not using it.

Not that the Edge isn't a good motor, but it doesn't have the digital maximizer or infinite speed control --- so it will be much harder on the battery ---- features like that which are not in the Edge are why it's the lowest priced motor.

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I would go with the powerdrive, just personal preferance on the foot pedal. I also like the co-pilot. If you fish with kids and have to deal with stuff you can move around the boat and still control it. When things are good you can use the pedal when your away from it your hand takes over. I like to keep it on a lanyard. I would go with the 24 volt, but its your check book. Years ago I had a trolling motor you could flip a switch to go between 12V and 24V, but I don't know if any of the models talked about do that.

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