Guests - If You want access to member only forums on HSO. You will gain access only when you sign-in or Sign-Up on HotSpotOutdoors.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Dan189

Box vs. Scratch Calls

14 posts in this topic

Hello. I am new to turkey hunting. I have been doing a lot of homework reading various articles on how to scout/setup/call/etc, and would like everyone's advice on a fairly inexpensive call for a rookie turkey hunter.

I did read one article that recommended a high-pitched box call if you live in a traditionally windy landscape (RR valley falls into that category).

I was at Sportsman's the other day looking at calls, but there are so many in each category I didn't even know where to begin.

Any and all advice and specifics on brand/model would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Man, one call will NEVER do. grin Seriously, you should have a slate call and a box call and before you're done with this new obsession you'll have several of each along with mouth calls and snuff cans and wingbones and.....

Fact is, turkeys show a definite preference to one over the other every day. The more calls that you carry and know how to use, the better off you'll be.

As far as the higher pitched calls go. I believe the glass and crystal calls are mostly higher pitched than the slate calls. I have a Rohm Brothers custom box call that is very high pitched and works well for long distance calling and during windy conditions. You can probably find info on them on the web.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

DonBo,

I appreciate the feedback. I can see exactly what your saying, because from everything I've been reading on the web guys are carrying:

1 slate call

1 stryker

1 box call

2 mouth calls

1 owl hooter

1 crow call

My dilemma is that I want to ease my way into it. I can maybe budget for 2 of these. I am looking for inexpensive, and ease of use, and hopefully somewhat effective. any advice would be appreciated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dan,

If you pick up a Pot call you can mix up differnt strikers to get some different sounds. The power Crystal call is still a favorite of mine-- nice range of calls, easy to condition and it can really scream if you want it to. I have seen some striker packs and they carry an acryilic, a hardwood and possibly a carbon striker. 3 different sounds from the same call. I would however have an experienced turkey hunter show you how to use one or pick up a video.

Good Luck

Steve

Good luck with your call selections and your hunt.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you wanted to get two calls. I would probably go with a Primos Double cutter box call and Primos Ol Betsy Slate call. I'm not a total Primos guy, but I do like the Double cutter because of the groove for your thumb for clucks and cutting. I think a box call will give you some volume for windy days. I think that a call like Ol Betsy are easier to use and tend to work good on calm days. I just picked up a pack of locator calls with the crow, owl,& pileated woodpecker from Knight & Hale that I like alot better than the Primos ones for twenty bucks

There is alot of choice thats for sure. Good Luck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

delzz,

thanks for the info. gives me a reference point, and something to research so I don't go into the retail store flying blind.

How much maintenance have you seen with the double cutter and ol' betsy?

Also how difficult were they to learn, as well as the mouth calls that you picked up. I've been water fowling pretty heavily for a few years, and noticed there is definitely a learning curve with various duck/goose calls, how would you say these compare?

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dan189, I've had good luck with the" Triple Threat" By Quaker Boy. It has an acrylic,slate and aluminum surface all on one call. Get two strikers and you have some variety. I've hunted 3 seasons and have 2 toms to my credit. This is an easy way to go for a first timer. Some of the other calls need some practice to sound good. I'm still a rookie but this has been pretty simple to do. Also make sure your decoys are facing you and inside your shooting range. Good Luck DrJ. Can't wait till Weds. Am 349-A.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

DrJ,

I havn't got around to decoys. do you ever hear of guys hunting sucessfully without them? I guess if it was anything like waterfowling, it would be pretty much impossible. But if it were like deer hunting, it helps but not necessary.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A slate style call paired with a boxcall will be easiest to learns as well and very versitile.

Slate is geenral the most forgiving surface to play. Both glass and crystal surfaces require more frequent condition to get good sounds out of them. The metal surfaces are the hidhest pitched but are also a bit tricky to work.

Boxcalls are one of my favorite turkey calls. It's a very versitile call played either soft or loud and cuts the wind well.

My personal favorite production calls are the Quaker Boy Grand Old Master boxcall and and HS Strut Champion slate over glass. Either buy a striker pack or it you have access to some 1/4-3/8" hardwood dowels or an old carbon arroe shaft and are handy you can make a few of you own that should make good turkey sounds. All you need are dowels, glue, saw, drill and sandpaper. For the handle you can use a 3/4" dowel or an old corn cob.

Make sure to get an acrylic or carbon striker that'll work on a wet call it you hunt in the rain.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

DrJ,

I havn't got around to decoys. do you ever hear of guys hunting sucessfully without them? I guess if it was anything like waterfowling, it would be pretty much impossible. But if it were like deer hunting, it helps but not necessary.

If I'm hunting any season other than an early season I leave the decoys at home. During later seasons decoys have cost me more toms than they have lured into rnage. The mature tom is used to the hens coming to him. When he sees the hen decoy he often goes into gobbling/strut mode out of shotgun rnage and then the real herns show up and the party's over. Without a decoy he'll just keep looking for that hidden hen.

Try to set up behind a small rise in terrain, bend in a field road, etc so when the turkey shows up where you can see him he's already in shotgun range.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very helpful Borch. I am actually off to scheels right now to go check out some calls. It helps to get multiple opinons especially when I can start to see trends overlapping.

What do you think about multiple mouth calls, such as owl, crow, etc? are they effective?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What do you think about multiple mouth calls, such as owl, crow, etc? are they effective?

I rarely use locator calls. Generally turkeys gobble on their own eventually. Few of us have the huge areas needed to chase a distant gobble anyway. It's nice to hear one gobble but most of us would be better off staying put and relying on scouting to get us set up in an area known to hold birds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

from what I understand locator calls, just produce a loud noise for them to respond to when scouting. why would a crow or owl call work better than a duck or goose call?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some guys have luck with goose calls. I've never heard one shock gobble to a goose. Now sandhill cranes and hawks...that's a different story. I have had luck getting shock gobbles from both crow and owl calls. Out west I won't go hunting without a crow call.

The boxcall makes an excellent locator as well. But you need to be prepared to set up quickly if you get a close response.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Posts

    • Either I'm slackin', or the sun is rising earlier than it did last year! Didn't make it to the river until 6, but surprisingly I was still the first to arrive  walked to my normal starting spot, but once there, something told me to go out of the ordinary. So I packed away my black panther martin and put on a crayfish husky jerk. I didn't catch the trophy I desired, but I did catch some nice ones, with the biggest being about 15 inches. I ventured farther downstream than I ever had before, and wanted to keep going, but it appeared that the fishing easement ended, and I may have been on private property. I stayed in the river the entire time, but didn't want to push my luck, so I went back upstream. Caught 19 total, probably lost at least as many. Surprisingly, no brook trout though. 
    • Oh yeah, a lot of the newer 1/2 tons have frame rust issues as well.  If you want a serious off-road machine, you need to go back to the models with the straight front axles, and of course, they're getting harder to find in decent shape too.  Especially in the rust belt.  You can still find solid older trucks if you head west, young man...        
    • Just to be clear- The wrangler wasn't introduced until 87 so at least compare apples to apples and having owned ford,chevy and dodge trucks of the Wrangler era I can testify they all have issues. My 08 Ram had more frame and fender rust than my older Jeep. The Chevy's have plenty of frame issues as well. Yes. It's a concern but if you want something like this,there is no better alternative.   https://www.google.com/search?q=chevy+frame+rust+problems&client=opera&hs=Lrs&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjAnPz1kMrTAhVpw4MKHSs9B1UQ_AUICigB&biw=800&bih=381
    •   Good questions. You have 3 body style configurations to choose from.  The YJ body was made from 87-97 and that had either a 4 cyl or an inline 6. It had leaf springs and a pretty spartan interior IMO. Some serious off roaders liked the leaf springs but they rode pretty rough IMO.   I feel the 4 cyl is anemic especially with bigger tires. The 4.0 inline 6 is bulletproof, has decent torque and power and fits the Jeep about perfectly. In the YJ series the manual transmission seemed like a better option in my experience.   The TJ ran from 98-06. This version replaces leaf springs with coil over shocks. Mine is an 06 and has the dana rear with the 4.0 and auto trans. I have BFG AT KO 32x10s and on gravel they have taken out 2 side mirrors by throwing rocks at them.    I prefer the TJ series. It has better suspension and interior than the YJ while keeping the original drive train. Fuel economy pretty much sucks as you are essentially driving a brick. I probably get about 12 MPG. If they had done a diesel I would think the wrangler could get 30 but...   The JK series replaced the TJ and was a pretty radical redesign. The body is wider, the drivetrain is totally different and the interior was upgraded quite a bit as well. They went to a pentastar V6 instead of the inline 4.0. trans was upgraded as well. They also started to sell the 4 door unlimited which gives more interior space as well. The new ones are much more civilized and refined which is great for taking the top off and driving to the lake or beach. OTOH they are expensive and harder to justify taking off the top and heading into the woods to hunt or find mud. 
    • Yes, you do have to have at least a weak cell signal and battery for the GPS to work. I know that can be challenging at times in the woods.
    •   Not sure about the new V6, but the old inline 6 was bulletproof, and had a lot of low end torque, which is a desirable feature in an off-road vehicle.       Any 1/2 ton pickup truck from the 70's and early 80's in particular, had a much better frame than a Jeep.  Body panels rust in all of them.   Not saying this is a deal-breaker for a Jeep, just something to watch for, since it is a very common problem.    
    • After doing a little looking there are a lot of options to these things. Anyone know how that new V6 compares to the in line 6? Some of the stuff I would like is the bigger tires and because I would consider putting a plow on it a lower rear end gear. The Dana 44 rear axel would be nice and would want a hard and soft top. I'm in no hurry to get one so Ill wait till the right one comes around. There are a lot of them out there that never leave the tar. More options in the later models as far as transmissions to. So it also comes down to how much I want to spend on one and how late of a model to buy. Sure don't want to spend 35K on a new one.
    • Well yeah but can you name a vehicle built for off road including any domestic pickup truck that doesn't have issues with rust. Fenders, rockers, frames etc. If you play in the mud and salt you need to maintain them. UTVs are no different. Ask yourself why Polaris would put the air filter canister intake in the rear wheel well so it is sucking in the air from the dustiest area they could possibly draw it from resulting in a 4k bill when the motor grenades.    Jeeps are fun, used ones can be had at a reasonable price but by their nature you need to be careful when you purchase because if the previous owner drove them the way they were marketed then they may have some issues.   But the aftermarket has an amazing amount of mods,upgrades and accessories to make your Jeep into anything you want and because the generally go 10 years between major design changes there are a large number of parts available if you need them.     
    • Anyfish it's still points and way better than a zero for points! Congrats on the fine eating bird.
  • Our Sponsors