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KLoopBinaction

Geothermal

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go to the Home Improvement Forum and search past threads. Lots of good information there. I am assuming u mean directional boring for the Pipes. Generally they would trench it in. Gonna be digging big trenches or wells anyway.

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It is becoming pretty popular in Eastern South Dakote, but there aren't many companies installing them so trying to get one installed can be challenge because the few that are doing it seem to be very busy.

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Most of the systems around here are verticle loops/wells, and are done with a well drilling machine.

I believe the horizontal loops /trenching are done if there is adequate space available on the site.

You shouldnt need directional services, but I'm just guessing about that.

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never heard of using directional drilling most are trenches around here. There are more and more companies doing it around here. Most are well drilling cos or plumbing & heating outfits.

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we have dug a couple for a home builder we work for. the company that they have install them is genz-ryan heating and plumbing. they might be able to answer more of your questions. i dont know much about them other than they are becoming more and more popular.

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I have a bore rig that I'd like to do some geo in between the fiber jobs, from what I've read is you do a pin wheel style and set a manifold system from your starting pit. I'd think d-bore would be a much less evasive aproach, eliminating all the settling and such, just my 2 cents.. doesn't seem to be a lot going on, maybe due to the building? I've also heard you can retro the geo to existing, so I guess I'll just keep on lookin

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there are a few different options, the well type being the most expensive, multiple loops need alot of space and are invasive. a buddy did his own system, he dug a 10'deep by 20' square hole and looped his pipe in there. he uses a wood fired boiler to heat his home and shop. said his wood comsumption is was down from last year. i think the winter was colder then last so it seemed to work.

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Geothermal is an incredible system. I put it my new home and a very happy I did. I am heating just under 4,000 sq/ft. and my highest heating bill in the last two winters was $108. Keep in mind geothermal also cools the house as well. My highest cooling bill was $22. I had the verticle wells installed simply because I didn't want to lose my trees nor the expense of relandscaping half my yard.

There are several contractors in Minnesota and western Wisconsin that install geothermal systems. My advice is to talk to and get bids from several contractors and get referances from each. Take the time to educate yourself on the system and ask questions. The system can be expensive. The contractors I spoke with estimated a 7-8 year payback but based on my bills the first two years I should see the system paying for itself in the first 5 years.

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Geothermal is an incredible system. I put it my new home and a very happy I did. I am heating just under 4,000 sq/ft. and my highest heating bill in the last two winters was $108. Keep in mind geothermal also cools the house as well. My highest cooling bill was $22. I had the verticle wells installed simply because I didn't want to lose my trees nor the expense of relandscaping half my yard.

There are several contractors in Minnesota and western Wisconsin that install geothermal systems. My advice is to talk to and get bids from several contractors and get referances from each. Take the time to educate yourself on the system and ask questions. The system can be expensive. The contractors I spoke with estimated a 7-8 year payback but based on my bills the first two years I should see the system paying for itself in the first 5 years.

By using a directional drill, you don't disturb trees or remove any/much soil, it's considered a pin wheel design. Depth that I'm limited to is about 28' deep, so I should be good

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For business purposes I have been looking at what should be done for energy efficiency in homes. The mechanical systems should be the last thing on the list. If you make it the 1st thing and do other things later it becomes inefficient.

Let me tell you about my cousin. Last spring he put in Geo in a 1,800 sf ranch at a cost of over $15K. The house is a 1950's with newer steel siding and newer windows. I advised him to do some other things first. This first winter he was not happy with how much it ran and that the savings are not what was expected.

If you know anything about the stack affect is that you loose a lot of air through the cieling to be replaced by cold air coming in from the bottom. So the first place to do anything is sealing up the air leaks high and low. In the attic you find and seal around every light fixture in the cieling of the top floor. Sealing other areas include the plumbing stack, flue and chimney ar ethe big areas. If you really want to go all the way then do the wiring protrusions into the attic and even the top of all of the walls. If you have any soffits seal them off to.

Becarefull when working around flues, chimneys and can lights to do it in a safe manor and not create a fire hazard. Can lights can be IC rated but are not air tight. New air tight can lights are available.

After sealing bulk up the insulation.

Next go to the lowest level. The rim joist is very leaky and not well insulated. Fiberglass stuffed in these areas does little to help. Fiberglass is not an air seal. To air seal get EPS sheets and cut to fit and then seal with expanding foam.

Exposed basement walls lose a lot of heat. You can get foil lined EPS and using construction adhesive attach directly to the foundation.

In the summer the humidity in the air can take as much energy to remove it as it takes to cool it. I have seen some figures that air sealing saved a 1/2 ton to over a ton in equipment needs on a 2 or 3 ton unit. That is a lot.

If you can handle working in the attic the materials are not expensive. Also general weatherstripping of windows and doors should be done.

If you have dual pane windows then you will not see much of a savings with new windows but if you have old single pane windows it may be worth it to upgrade. When upgrading look at windows that fit your climate and even each windows exposure, you might get different glass for windows that get a lot of sun versus a north facing window.

One of the harder things to do is to add insulation to the walls. It can be done at a reasonable cost if your home needs it.

I would say these things are the minimum needed before considering a GEO unit. If you do the equipment 1st and air seal/insulate then it will not be sized properly for your needs. AC needs to run a sufficient amount of time to remove the humidity, an over sized unit will quickly cool the air but will not reduce the humidity level.

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Do not seal your soffits up. They are there for a reason...to try to keep your roof space as close to outside temperature as possible. This is in an effort to avoid condensation within your roof space.

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We have geothermal in our house and love it!!! Nice even heat, none of this turning the thermostat up and down, and coming home to a cold house. I figured out the electricity cost several years ago and it cost us $500 to heat and cool our house for a full year. Ours is a loop system with the coils buried six feet down in a pit about 70 foot long by 30 feet wide. If you're building new, seriously consider it!!

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