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mozy

Bobber rod

14 posts in this topic

What kind of characteristics should I look for in a slip bobber rod? I'm thinking I can get by with a fairly cheap rod since sensitivity is not as important. What power and actions do you like? I'm thinking something along the lines of 7'6" ML fast? Or would moderate action be better? By the way, this will double as a crappie slip bobber rod as well. Any recommendations?

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I know a lot of guys are using longer rods for their Bobber fix. I have a friend who uses nothing shorter than 9 footers. That's just not practical for me. I use my 6'6" ML F Croix and it works great. I try to get the most versatility out of my rods as possible though.

I think you are on the right track with a 7'6" that will give you plenty of casting distance with some of the lighter set-ups you may be using for Craps/Eyes.

Now lets hear from some of the real Pro's.

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I use a 6' 9" ML Limit Creek Smoothie for slip bobbering. Good all around rod. If I was going to dedicate one rod to bobbers I'd go a little longer but stick with ML fast action. The advantage of the longer rods is the ability to pickup line fast with those longer casts but I found I lost some accuracy in my casting above 8ft in length. Not an issue if fishing walleyes on Mille Lacs but a big issue when targeting crappies and weedlines. Around 7ft works best for me.

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I use a 7' ML Shimano Compre and it works grear for bobbers. Setting the hook with a longer rod is a breeze, especially in deeper water or when you have lots of line out.

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I like a longer rod in the seven foot range.

It makes casting and also setting the hook easier.

Only problem I have is being short it makes it tough netting a fish when useing a longer leader.

Sifty

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G. Loomis HSR 9000 7'6". mag light action. Awesome rod. Can be used for live bait rigging also.

Or look at the cabela's fish eagle II. I think you can get a 7' 6" ML for around $79 or so.

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i like long, soft rods, slow action rods. they cast very well with floats even into the wind. and the leverage and length are great for controlling the fish around structure.

i have been using a 10' zebco slab seeker, with the TAT (tap action tip) snipped off (because the line always seemed to tangle around it) for float fishing for walleyes. and even though it is an UL rod it pulled a couple 1-2 lb walleyes out of deepweedlines last summer.

also the slab seeker is very durable. which makes it an even better bang for the buck

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I run 9' 2 piece Fenwick HMX M or ML actions. Long rods allow you to pick up slack quick and they give you better casting ability.

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I use a Steelhead rod when corking in 15 FOW or more or in moving water.

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Shortest I go for a bobber rod is 7' but mostly run a 8.5' moderate action rod. It can also double as a nice steel rod as well.

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I have the 9000 and a Loomis Steelhead IMX 1084 (not sure on the model # now) It's 8'6". Works great for slip bobbers and rigging the mud on Mille lacs.

I'll be in touch soon.

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At least 7' med action, for walleye slip bobbers. I have used 9' rods with lighter lines in clear water.

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jigginjim, don't you have something else better to do like check to see if docks are in yet? J/K I read some of those post. What a crock!

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