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Painting Paneling?

10 posts in this topic

Just wondering if anybody has ever had luck painting paneling? I have heard of people doing it but not with alot of success. Thinking of doing it and was wondering if there is any tricks to it?

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prep work here is Key.

Cleaning and sanding followed by a good primer. Let the primer cure for a week before painting will give you the best results

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They sell a special primer for panelling. We used it at our cabin. It worked great. I think it was called gripper.

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We painted ours a couple of years ago. Did as echo2010 has suggested and have had no problems.

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Lots of panneling is embossed paper,ya paint it the paper absorbs moisture expands,bubbles and looks terrible.

Wood grain panneling the grain always shows till it has many coats of paint to fill the grain.

So make sure ya have real wood panneling before your sorry ya painted it.

I personally painted different panneling and was never satified with the look!

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I painted glossy looking paneling in my basement to brighten it up. I wiped it down and primed it with a kilz primer/sealer, lt it dry overnight and then put regular interior paint over it. I've since sold the house and it had been on there for 3 years with no chipping or bubbling.

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Speaking as A painter,here is what I would do.sand everything with 100 grit paper or sanding sponges ,vacuum and wipe it with a deglosser , use a quality oil based primer like kilz ,after primer dries give a quick sand,clean and topcoat

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I would just like to add...

If you or someone you live with have an aversion to Oil Based (killz), or Shelack Based (Binz, which IMO is the best bet for this aplication but by far the most dangerous of all listed), you can get an Amonia Based primer that works very well for odd stuff like paneling.

Take a look at Fresh Start. It is made by Benny Moore's and is likely the easyest of the specialty primer's for a homeowner to use. It also carries more pigment than sealer, so the coverage is better in the long run.

Good Luck.

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Lots of panneling is embossed paper,ya paint it the paper absorbs moisture expands,bubbles and looks terrible.

Wood grain panneling the grain always shows till it has many coats of paint to fill the grain.

So make sure ya have real wood panneling before your sorry ya painted it.

I personally painted different panneling and was never satified with the look!

My kitchen cabinets were paper covered and I decided i would paint them and if it didnt turn out, I would reface them.

I removed the hinges and took the doors off.I cleaned them very well then lightly sanded. i put a coat of kilz on them by brush, let it sit for one week, put another coat of kilz and let it sit one more week.

I then top coated it with Nu Cling from Vogel Paint.

I got a rock hard finish from it that I have had for 3 years without any nicks or bubbles. I did get a marring type of scratch from my jeans button, but that came right off with some bar keepers friend.

Looks like custom cabinets, you would never know they were cheap with a paper veneer

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Thanks to everyone that replied! I sanded cleaned then primed with bullseye 123 primer. It turned out great! Thanks again to everyone.

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