Guests - If You want access to member only forums on HSO. You will gain access only when you sign-in or Sign-Up on HotSpotOutdoors.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Greycat

To bury or Not to bury

17 posts in this topic

I have had a couple of discussions lately about field dressing your harvested deer and what is best done about the organs and entrails. We have had an exploding coyote population and more attacks on the local deer by coyote packs and aggressive singles.

One surprising opinion that I can’t get out of my head is the guy that prescribes that any hunter that doesn’t bury the remains is lazy and doesn’t care about increased coyote attacks on deer or the exploding coyote population.

I am not sure it is always practical and even if buried, I am sure coyotes would sniff it out and dig them up anyway. In addition I don’t know that there is any evidence the gorging on deer remains entices more deer attacks than would normally occur.

So are we lazy and uncaring and does any of this have merit?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No merit IMO. A coyote has an icnredible sense of smell and if one caught wind of entrails buried or not, they'll dig them back up.

Saying someone is lazy for not burying the entrails is just plain naive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My take on the subject is that gut piles have been feeding animals for hundreds of years. so what! Any healthy deer can escape yotes anyday, so no I'm not going to rent a backhoe to rip up the frozen tundra that is northern Minn in deer season just so I can bury the guts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

why not hunt over the guts? we do and do take our share of them, but that is us.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's ridiculous to bury a gut pile. The larger animals that may feed off it will just dig it up, and you may keep the smaller ones from getting an easy meal. What about all the birds that feed on it?

It's all about the cycle of life. Food chain. Don't deny any of the woodland critters access to this natural food source.

Bury it so other people don't have to see it? I certainly wouldn't leave a gut pile in the neighbors yard but anywhere else and it will be gone in few days, as nature intended.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

NOT!!!! How does this even come up???

Some of the most entertaining moments of deer hunting occur a day or two after you taged one and you are sitting in the same stand watching the birds and other critters eating away at the gut pile.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't bury it, the gut pile from my buck I shot this year was gone within 2 days.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Burying them is a waste of time. I gutted a buck in the Black Hills once, and unloaded my rifle and opened a beer. Four feet away from me, two Gray Jays were already picking the fat chunks off the pile. As for the coyotes, they make great targets for the rest of the hunt. I've seen gut piles disappear overnight in Pine County.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Icehouse, You didn't have a hunting buddy that was the 'butt' of a cruel joke involving a little too much brew, that gut pile and a forked stick, did you?? grin Phred52

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why!!! Bury them unless you dig a hole to china!! The coyotes or fox will just dig them up!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've actually set up trail cameras over gut piles, very interesting!!! Coyotes, foxes, cats, crows, hawks, they keep coming until its all gone!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

then you'll have to get liscenced to carry a cased shovel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Posts

    •   I would definitely get the one with the Pheasant plowing attachment! Beats walking the fields!
    • Never getting rid of my Suburban. Just looking for a new toy for hunting etc. that I can drive down narrow dirt roads up north. Another reason why I would rather buy a slightly used one so I can use it without worrying about putting a few scratches on it. Those side by sides look like fun but you have to haul them around and cant drive them everywhere. And they just aren't built to take what a Jeep can. Always kind of liked the looks of Jeeps and being able to remove the top in the summer is nice to. Would definitely want a hard top to as the soft tops aren't to good for MN winters. I'm sure the newer ones have better heaters than the older ones as I remember back in the day guys were dressed like they were snowmobiling while driving their Jeep. And scraping frost off of the window to see.
    • I went through the same thing. I had ATV's at first then bought an RZR. It was fun but honestly the quality for the price is pretty bad. You can go up to a Can Am but then the price is even worse. So a few years after I sold the RZR I got the itch again but then started looking at the Wranglers and ended up doing that. I bought a 2006 with the 4.0 and after that and buying a used 6.6' plow I was into it for less than 13.5k and can drive it everywhere.   I have the hardtop on mine. I just take it off in the summer and drive it when it's nice. IMHO it's the way to go but you need to watch out for ones that are rusted out. I take the doors off, the top off and drive around sniping gophers, head to the lake or just cruise around. I like the 32" BFG KO tires.     
    •   What's a big guy like you going to do with a little SUV?  Your still keeping the truck to pull that new trailer right?
    • Good luck, have fun and stay topside this time of year.
    • Did you have to sand in between coats of lacquer? I was going to use a pre catalyzed lacquer for a little more durability, but it seems like it would take forever to get in all of the grooves. 
    • Some of the older ones had a 4 cylinder. Think the new ones only have a 6 now.
    • White pine needs bud caps to survive.     DNR had this publication you might find interesting managing_woodland_deer.pdf   Here is another link.... from extension   http://www.myminnesotawoods.umn.edu/2007/04/minnesota-woodlands-and-wildlife-strategies-and-species/   Balsam fir and spruce are good if we ever have another bad winter....
  • Our Sponsors