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sbro73

Glove?

40 posts in this topic

Last year hands got all tore up handling fish, anybody use any of the fishing gloves out there,if so what's the best?

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I'm pretty happy with the muskie armor gloves. The are nice and thin so they don't feel awkward when handling fish and eliminate the cuts and tears from handling the toothies.

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I'm not a total cheap-[PoorWordUsage] but my wife got some rubber coated gardening gloves for about $5 and they seem to work pretty well. That said I don't always take the time to put them on - thus the scars on my hands.

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Your hands shouldn't be cut if your doing it right, except maybe from hooks. Plus with gloves on you can't feel if you accidently put your fingers in their gills...I won't wear gloves for that reason.

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I'm not a fan for gloves. Too much time to put on while the fish needs to be released. Be a man and deal with the cuts and stitches!!!!

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Chic's dig scars!!!!!!!!!!!!

Duck

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They do??? How come I cant find a good one??? Girls are like pimples, they come and they go!!!

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Chic's dig scars!!!!!!!!!!!!

Duck

Of course they do, Duck. Especially after almost losing your hand to the mouth of a musky last year!!!

The Musky Armor gloves are the best that are out there for handling fish. Very thin to allow you to not lose any dexterity when handling the fish and they dry out quickly. They've also eliminated the excessive amounts of blood that I used to leave in the bottom of my boat, steering wheel, gloves, clothes, and everywhere else. Most of the time I've found that they aren't necessary. But definitely nice to have when the fish gives that thrash and would otherwise put some nice scrapes or gashes in your fingers.

Aaron

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Don't ask me, the cork on my rods tend to have a reddish tint to them for some reason wink

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No glove for me. I just don't think that I need one and I wouldn't take the time to put one on when I am already looking for my release tools that usaully aren't where they should be.

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I just don't think that I need one and I wouldn't take the time to put one on when I am already looking for my release tools that usaully aren't where they should be.

I used to think this too. That was until I got a nice gash that essentially cost me a few hours of fishing time due to constant attention to stopping the flow of blood. 10 seconds to grab a glove and put it on is worth it over lost time fishing (and hopefully catching). Put a glove in your pocket or velcro it to something near where you net fish and it's never an inconvenience.

Aaron

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HAHAHAHAHA thanks Aaron. A glove is in order for next year. Boated my new personal best last year (53) and when I tryed to pick her up, she opened her mouth and started to head shake. Hand came loose and went rite into her mouth as she kept on head shaking. Shoulda had stiches but didnt want to stop fishing. Hand bled for about an hour afterwards. Got a 1 inch scar on the palm of my hand now.

Duck

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John, what caused the gash? I can't say for sure. Cold temps, numb hands, a fish that wants to shake, and the next thing you know I have a nasty gash on my knuckle. Not sure if I got a tooth (this is my guess) or something else. But it's something my Musky Armor glove would have prevented if I had not been of the frame of mind, "Screw that, I'm not wearing gloves. Cut up hands are cool looking. Shows you're catching fish!".

Aaron

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ah the good old days. smile theres definitly an art to handling feisty, toothy, mean and nasty, determined to escape, terrified fish. ''it's all in the wrist'' grandpappy used to laugh when i'd get bit. the trick for me has been understanding their body language. with practice i've learned to spot when they are about to go nuts and i delay the landing. once that was figured out i never bled again. now, since i've decided on full water releases (of fish that can be) the chances are even more slim. and since it's looking like august before i'll be able to hit the water again frown even slimmer.

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No glove here, tried it in my early years, turned into a fly magnet after it got all slimmed up, handled the last 100+ with no issue. Walleye/panfish chew up my hands with their sharp fins sometimes, muskies are a piece of cake once you've handled a bunch of them.

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I got a pair of Musky Armor and use them now. After needing 5 stitches and a $600 bill I learned my lesson. Have handled quite a few with no issues, but this one was in the dark and I was by myself. Still do not know how it happened. Fish was released and swiming away and I noticed blood all over my shirt, looked and had a big gash on my thumb, never felt a thing.

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oh man kjgmh, was it a tooth or the hook or the gills that cut ya ? I shouldn't say piece of cake, but once you have released a couple hundred of them it becomes easy and that easy means you must have all the right tools to do the job and they need to be ready before you land a ski and definitely a tangle proof treated net or cradle. A glove is like a batters glove some use some don't, it's all about the level of comfort you have, but accidents can and still do happen in a corkscrew of a ski, that twisting motion they do can really get ya quick, be careful.

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I have used a glove to tail a Muskie before however I don't like to use them when picking them up under the gill plate.

Like was said above, if you hold them the right way you will seldome have any problems holding on. Most of what I have seen with my clients is simply that they don't hold on hard enough. I always tell them to hold them like they're lives depended on it. (The fishes lives)

The only way a Muskie can get your hand with their teeth is if you open your hand in their mouth. Keep our hand closed tighly and you won't get cut.

Afterall, if you aren't man enought to hold them, maybe you should try something more dosile, like a bass. smilesmile

"Ace"

Ace guide service.

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I thought it guideman but couldn't go there, there are some good reasons for some to go with a glove. If I would type the same I'd probably get booted again. That 1 glove I tried in the 80's I couldn't run a chainsaw through the thing after the first slim dried on it, I looked at my cousin and we concluded it was a complete waste of money not to mention the glove was so nasty and stiff I could've scaled a crappie with the thing. I'm sure today's gloves are much improved, but anything that adds time to my releases has been thrown out.

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After needing 5 stitches and a $600 bill I learned my lesson.

600 Bucks??? Had that done last summer and it was a little over a hundred!!! You got hosed!!! I think if you need stitches a glove would have done nothing at all.

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I've only boated 2 fish near and over 50, but those seem to be the only ones that have given me any trouble.

Both fish were handled fine but even if your hand is closed inside the gill plate you can get a nice scrape and a cut from those rows of teeth on the roof of their mouth. No fault of the handler, its just how the fish are built.

n710305337_4042551_6685.jpg

one of the fish mentioned above (caught by Riverkid21), sometimes it doesn't matter if you've got a glove on or not. smile

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Cut my thumb open pretty darn good on LOW last summer....had to drive around for 2.5 hours before finally finding a hospital. about 600 bucks and 4 stitches later I was good to go. Luckily health insurance covered that. I still don't like to wear gloves as I prefer having a good touch on the fish as to handle it properly and quickly. Surgical gloves seem like a good idea though.

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See hand in photo, why don't mine get like that ? I've handled a couple hundred of them now so ?

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Quote:
See hand in photo, why don't mine get like that ? I've handled a couple hundred of them now so ?

it's all in the wrist. grin

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