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upnorth

Garbage in the Oceans

26 posts in this topic

Seen this on GMA this am and thought about what pigs some of are! Recycling is not that tough and we should all consider a more earnest effort at it. Soon we are all going to be tip toeing through the garbage instead of tulips.

The old saying goes, "One man's trash is another man's treasure." But what if one man's trash becomes another man's dinner?

Sam Champion follows the trash trail right back into your home.

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That's a worry among some researchers, given that one of the world's largest garbage dumps is the regular feeding ground for many fish that, then, end up on cutting boards around the world.

It's a sea within a sea; an estimated 3½ million tons of garbage, mostly plastic, both sunken and floating, that covers miles of ocean stretching from the coast of California all the way to China.

The concentration of watery waste is caused by a series of currents in the Pacific Ocean that swirl in a circular motion, pulling in debris from North America, Asia and the Hawaiian Islands.

Capt. Charles Moore, who discovered the watery dump 10 years ago, calls it "the Great Pacific Garbage Patch" and told "Good Morning America" that it is growing every year.

"Bottle caps, soap bottles, shards of plastic. ... Look at that over there," Moore yelled, pointing out a patch of garbage. "That's disgusting."

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The plastic decomposes but never completely disappears and is sometimes mistaken by fish and birds for food.

To raise awareness about marine debris, Marcus Erickson, a researcher on one of Moore's expeditions, took his own trip to the garbage patch in a homemade raft made of 15,000 plastic bottles.

The irony was not lost on one beautiful 12-inch rainbow runner he caught for dinner.

"We filleted it, opened the stomach and ... there were 17 fragments of plastic," he said.

Similarly, marine researcher Christiana Boerger found one fish with 26 different colorful pieces of plastic in its stomach.

"It's like putting the whole ocean on a plastic diet," Moore said.

To keep humans away from that plastic diet, Moore and Erickson's research group, called the Algalita Foundation, plan to return to the garbage patch this summer to test samples of fish to see if plastic or other hazardous chemicals could be slipping into what people eat.

Local restaurants, such as Uncle's Fish Market and Grill of Hawaii whose fish products will be shown on air, told "Good Morning America" they assure the safety of all their fish and point to a decade-long record of health safety.

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I saw a clip of this, but had to leave before the story aired. What a bunch of tools. How does anyone think that littering like this is a good idea?

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Its Been on Nat.Geo a few times,I think his next voyage to classify the trash will be on this spring,He found it by accident sailing across the Pacific saw so much he went back and now hes financed by NG for study & filming.

If ya want to watch keep a eye on NG channel its been on a few times now.Its amazing how much trash is out there.It was explained as pulling a plug on a sink the eddy pulls all the trash in the Pacific to that center of the eddy.

I watch lots of NG!

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Sounds like the perfect place to send people on the sentence to serve program. Load them on ships and give them each a dipnet and tell them to pick up the trash. When the ships hold is full they bring it to say some third world country for dispoasal.

Ok kidding about the third world country.

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You don't have to go to the Pacific to see this kind of stuff, just wait till the snow melts and take a gander at the roadsides as you drive thru the metro this spring.

"That boy is a P-I-G pig" wink

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There is no doubt that this kind of stuff is everywhere. Just this the national scene and is not just my opinion on the garbage I pick up while out hiking or just taking a walk.

There is the mentality with some people that someone else is going to pick up after them and it makes wonder how they were brought up. I see some much it can't just be a small few.

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I've often wondered if there has been any study to show whether the amount of roadside litter increased when we starting sponsoring 2-mile sections.

After all, someone will eventually pick it up as they have accepted that responsibility right?

Bob

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I was stopped behind a car at a light loaded with high school kids and all of a sudden they started throwing garbage out the window. I couldn't believe it so I honked my horn and gave them the "what the heck" look and all they did was look at me and throw more out as they drove away. Do people with kids like this have any idea of how they are acting? If I even heard about any of my kids doing something like that I would have them picking up trash for a month. I still can't believe it when I think about it.

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It was more than likely the parents who taught them these manners....toss it out the window and don't get my van floor dirty. frown

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I was in Galveston Tx a couple years back and we did some boat tours, ya it was sick seeing pop bottles and wrappers all floating around. Tried to make a point of it to the step kids at the time about littering, the whole litter in MN it will eventually end up in an ocean somewhere.

Had a similar episode as fishorgolf too, people just throwing junk out a window on 81, I honked too and got the look back like I was the ignorant person. I got out walked over, picked up their McDonalds bag and threw it in the back of my truck.

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We usually take at least a walmart bag with to pick up garbage on hikes or walks especially in the spring. I have seen piles of garbage 2 or three miles out in the woods on hiking trails, just plain disturbing that people that would seem to enjoy the outdoors would make such a mess of it.

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Garbage in the oceans is good. Just watch survirorman, and he uses garbage all time to survive. I would hate to be stranded without some old rope, rubber hose, pop can, metal scraps, paper to start a fire, etc.

Look at it this way, museums are filled with ancient garbage, so it will help future generations to figure out how we lived.

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I cant be sure exactly where, but they have outlawed plastic in the country. I know for sure Plastic bags. I don't know what else they have banned, and it seems to be working.

G.C.

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Across the world they have banned plastic bags, but not plastic (it would be impossible); I think Ireland and Austrila has also imposed a "tax" on each plastic bag you use.

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I think Ireland and Austrila has also imposed a "tax" on each plastic bag you use.

Um, can you delete that part before the Dems in MN or National read that and get any bright ideas please? grineeksickcrazy

crycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycry

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I know Maryland was legislating against plastic bags, and many states have a deposit required on plastic bottles.

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I don't thinking banning plastic bags or adding a deposit for plastic bottles is the answer. Somehow the attitude towards the earth has to change. That is going to have to start at home with parents teaching their kids from the start to become good stewards of the earth.

Back when our kids were little and we were out camping the last thing we did as we were leaving a campsite was to go around and clean any garbage that was left there by us or even previous campers. Today that is automatic.

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I don't thinking banning plastic bags or adding a deposit for plastic bottles is the answer. Somehow the attitude towards the earth has to change. That is going to have to start at home with parents teaching their kids from the start to become good stewards of the earth.

Back when our kids were little and we were out camping the last thing we did as we were leaving a campsite was to go around and clean any garbage that was left there by us or even previous campers. Today that is automatic.

In boy scouts we called this "policing the area" and we did it every time we left a camp site. even to this day I do this with the kids when we are leaving an area. Good habits are learned and tend to stick with you.

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Originally Posted By: DuckDog
I think Ireland and Austrila has also imposed a "tax" on each plastic bag you use.

Um, can you delete that part before the Dems in MN or National read that and get any bright ideas please? grineeksickcrazy

crycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycrycry

They probably got the idea from us anyway.

Bob

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Quote:
In boy scouts we called this "policing the area" and we did it every time we left a camp site. even to this day I do this with the kids when we are leaving an area. Good habits are learned and tend to stick with you.

That is exactly what I am talking about!!

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Gary C asked the question...

I cant be sure exactly where, but they have outlawed plastic in the country. I know for sure Plastic bags. I don't know what else they have banned, and it seems to be working.

G.C.

All I was replying to was his question....I agree we need to do our part. My back seat is full, as have all my vehicles been. I also try to fill my pockets with stuff found in the woods or along the road near our property. My Grandkids are learning quite a bit about recycling since moving back. My children are also good at it, however, in FL, they did not seperate the trash from the recylcing, so it is a new process for them. They do pick up thier trash outside. My daughter said though, that if the parents are lazy, what can you expect from their children.

As far as banning plastic bags, Marylands problem was more having to do with landfills then litter. It would be interesting to see though in the states that require a deposit on plastic bottles if there is and difference in them being a litter problem.

We have people at work that cannot carry recycling 15 ft to the proper receptacle when they have a waste basket right at their feet....And these are not young people, they are people that believe it doesn't make any difference.

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