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Pooh

chain saws???

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what do you have? do you like it/would you buy another one? what do you recomend?

just curious to see what guys out there like.

i have a husqvarna 40 16" about 5-7 years old rebuilt 3 years ago like the power to weight ratio. dont like the way it seems to work so hard to cut.

had a sachs dolmar 118 or 115 (i think) that blew up. wish i had that saw back, that was a sweet cutting saw. balanced, powerful. and little vibration. i wish i could find another one of those saws

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I have a Stihl MS310 with a 20" bar. I love it and would definitely buy another if I was in the market for a new saw.

My dad worked for the city for over 25 years and used many saws over that time. He asked if he could fire up my saw to try it out while we were clearing out a downed tree in the yard. You'd have to see the expression on his face to understand he looke dlike a kid in a toy store and a million bucks burning a hole in his pocket. After hit first cut, he was in disbelief. He thought it was a cheap saw since he's never used them. He's used most anything else other than Stihl.

I honestly think it scared him a little to see how well these saws run and how responsive the throttle is on them. I have the safety chain on mine and he still said that none of his saws in the past cut as fast as this one.

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I have a husky 460 with an upgraded Oregon 20" bar. I love it, I own 160 acres of land and cut alot of firewood. People ask me why I got a 20" bar, I told them so I don't have to bend over all the time when cutting or limbing...

Helps out on the back.

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I have a Stihl MS290 Farm Boss with an 18" bar. Great all-around, reliable saw I think.

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I've got a Stihl MS270 Wood Boss w/ an 18" bar and love it. I've taken down, de-branched and cut up close to 350 trees with it so far, and haven't had a problem with it yet. I would go get another one in a heartbeat. Warm or cold, starts right up. Easy maintenance too, I can do just about everything myself.

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I've build (carved) about a dozen log homes. Husky is the only one that has lasted for me I wore out my 262 and now my 365 is still running like new. I've ran up to 4-5 gals of gas in a day with them. I wont buy anything but Husqvarna. Just have to watch the air injection tube dont pug up ya.

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Only use mine for cutting personal fire wood but I have a 15 year old sears craftsman 16 in saw. It does everything that I have ever asked it to do and does it very well. Will knaw through a piece of log just fine for me! I have cut up quite a few trees with it and the only thing that I have ever had to do was sharpen the chain, change the plug once, and put gas & bar lube in it. Me and my buddy cleared scraps on a 10 acre patch after it was select cut and it never faultered. Plus it was inexpensive! Take care and N Joy the Hunt././Jimbo

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have a Johnsrud 2050 turbo, 18" bar. bought it 8-9 years ago, never had to do any work on it, still runs great. use it for cutting firewood. the first fews years would cut 3-4 cords, now down too about two. would buy one again.

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Only use mine for cutting personal fire wood but I have a 15 year old sears craftsman 16 in saw. It does everything that I have ever asked it to do and does it very well. Will knaw through a piece of log just fine for me! I have cut up quite a few trees with it and the only thing that I have ever had to do was sharpen the chain, change the plug once, and put gas & bar lube in it. Me and my buddy cleared scraps on a 10 acre patch after it was select cut and it never faultered. Plus it was inexpensive! Take care and N Joy the Hunt././Jimbo

Jimbo, same here. Mine has 20" bar and starts great, and runs great. I got it used from a buddy who used it only a few times, I have had it about 10 years maybe. I don't use it a ton though, if I did maybe a "better" brand, but for the firewood for cabin, taking down occassional tree, or ripping an 8x8 it works slick.

It was funny when my stepson who has stihl, and a neighbor who has Huksy, both needed to borrow it to finish jobs smile Their probs were minor, but I got to rib them about asking for the junky Craftsman to rescue them, ha!

When I worked for County Parks and Rec. we always has Johnsruds. I would get Stihl or Husky over Johns I think, but our Johns were pretty abused by Cnty workers wink

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Yeah Box, funny how that works isn't it!? I have found that if you buy decent quality stuff and take care of it you will get many years of service from it. Take care and N Joy the Hunt././Jimbo

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i have a poulan wildthing and it doesw everything i need it to do and not that expensive

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Stihl and Husquavarna are great saws. Can't go wrong with either, but from what I've seen in my area you can get more saw for the money with the Stihls. Jonseruds and Husky's are made by the same company.

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Jonserods model 70 its probably 25 years old but fires right up every fall no problem and has bottom end and mid range torque like no other I've ever used. Yeah its a little heavy but its all metal no plastic. My buddy bought a stihl 310 and we went side by side, I beat him by at least 30 seconds in a 20in elm. Not that a stihl is a bad saw but I have to say I prefer the older saws to the new ones because of the fact that the new ones run so [PoorWordUsage] many rpms to make up for the serious lack of torque which obviously does nothing for chain life and when u get into some wet wood they cant handle it. My old Jon will be in the family for many more years to come and these new plastic saws will still be 2nd best if there still around. my 2cents.

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All I own is stihl got a 021,044,066,075 and a 090 i wouldn't buy nothin but stihl

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Stihl is my preference, although I know Husqvarna makes good stuff as well. MS 260's are great heavy duty saws and take a lot of abuse. We just got a new MS 361 at work and I love it.

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wow im suprised to see that there are that many stihl guys out there. i figured id see more poulan and Mccullagh. seems like anyone with a stihl has nothing but good to say about em.

my old man has a johns like iceman is talking about, old and HEAVY. but a very good cutting machine, i wish i could find an old saw like his. porblem is carrying the dam thing around for a couple hours make a guy hurt the next day.

to each his own i guess.

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I dont think you can go wrong with either a Stihl or Husky, I live on a farm and have use both, I think our Stihl was kind of a lemon, now we have a Husky. I've used other Stihls and they have worked good. I've heard where Johnsred and Huskys are the same saw just different colors.

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Huskys are the same as a jons. just different colors and look but I think they have the same engines-etc. You are right Pooh as far as weight goes its a little heavy but I also have a jons 44 that gets used for limbing etc. so I don't have to lug the 70 all day long, plus I think the 70 balances very well so theres not alot of strain on the back like your probably thinking, the saw is made for a 20in. bar but I run an 18in makes it balance really good and run like [PoorWordUsage]. By the way I broke the handle on mine last fall and put an ad on [YouNeedAuthorization] for a 70e and had about 6-7 responses from people with saws willing to sell so if your looking for one I'd try that just keep in mind with a 25-30yr. old saw the parts are not that easy to find. Just have to make sure to mix the gas right, I go alitle heavy just because I'd rather put a new plug in than score a cylinder.

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  • Your Responses - Share & Have Fun :)

    • I would think so, it would be no different than parking on the shoulder of the road. my commit was more related to people that put up barriers, to keep others from crossing there approach.
    •   Sounds plausible to me.  Is the thickened footing in your mind the same as pouring the perimeter of the slab thicker?  We did an 8 inch perimeter around the 4 inch slab.
    • Yes. But on a post framed building the only think I ever see is a thickened footing and not a foundation to the frost line. A major benefit of post framing is that you install the posts below the frost line so the need for a concrete foundation below the frost line is not needed. If I am understanding the question correctly. 
    • FYI driveway approaches are on the public right of way, you may not block them, or place anything that can injure someone.   May a person park their own vehicle in their own driveway approach?
    • I think they’re more looking at the footings requirement, aren’t they?  Thus the reason for getting the poles below the frost line?   Its the township’s responsibility to figure this out and you have the right to ask them to cite the code they’re following.   I used to live in Isanti County and dealt with a building inspector from my township on the construction of my detached garage.  Things weren’t very strict to say the least.     We built everything by the current UBC code, so I’d suggest first getting a copy of the current version of that since this building will actually be your home.  Don’t take unnecessary shortcuts to save a few bucks up front.  You’ll eventually regret it.   Reading your plans for the slab, it sounds pretty good.  There are plenty of slab homes out there built the way you describe.  What you don’t want is movement.     I’m not an expert by any means but I think footings on your slab wouldn’t be a bad idea and sinking your poles that deep should be a requirement.  If you don’t do footings, at least pour your slab thicker on the perimeter to hold it better.    Your local Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ) can be more restrictive than code, but not less.  So if it’s defined in the UBC, you have to do at least that much.
    • I’ve personally been on both sides of this.   Used to love getting as much air as possible over driveways but I never understood gunning it on the other side after crossing.  I guess some are just mild adrenaline junkies.    I quit doing that for one, because it’s illegal, and two, not safe if the homeowner happens to be leaving or getting the mail at the time.   Now that I have a posted trail going over my driveway, I find it just rude, obnoxious and irritating to deal with 4 wheelers and sleds gunning it over the gravel and making ruts and eroding my base to the point of it being an expense to either plow and pack the class 5 back in place or spend the money to pave it.  I hate having to bounce over two ruts with my trailers and whatever I’m hauling in them too.   I think that’s the worst part for me.  Either jump it or be mellow on the throttle the entire way over.   I’ve seen trail groomers go around driveways before, making me wonder if that truly is a requirement or they were simply being courteous.  But I agree with knoppers, they should not drag over the driveway.  Maybe they think they’re taking the snow off for ya.  Call the people responsible for the trail and ask them for suggestions.  
    • If you want to get through ice fast and are going to re-tool for it completely, look at a Nils before making your final decision. 
    • I am fully aware of this as are most people.
    • some people are bad apples that give the sport a bad name, I as a snowmobiler have respect for driveways. FYI driveway approaches are on the public right of way, you may not block them, or place anything that can injure someone. trail groomers actually do you a favor by knocking down the bank, to keep it level. unless your groomer was not well trained, they will not groom over your driveway.
    • If code allows post frame for residential construction then by design you don't need a block foundation. 
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