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ZEEK1223

frost bite on my labs nose....am I crazy or is my vet?

18 posts in this topic

I have been hunting my dog pretty hard this year. He has a nice little gash on his back from a barnwire fence, the corner of his eye is cut, and his nose is beat up to the point where it was bloody. He was due for some shots at the vet, so I wanted them to check the other ailments out as well. I have had dogs my whole life, and know how to treat the injuries properly (advice from former vets). This vet is in the city,is fairly new to me. They gave me a little tounge lashing for not taking care of my dog properly. Keep in mind, my lab is about as spoiled as they get, and he is an indoor dog. I thought his nose was raw from nosing threw the weeds. They told me it was frostbite, and I should never hunt him in subzero wheather. This is the kind of vet where all you see is little lap dogs with sweaters on them. I love this vet, they hire intern students from the UofM that are eager to get in the field and probbly spend more time on my pup than other vets. For example: I went to the vet for annual shots, and the first thing she noticed was his nose. Thats when she told me it was frostbite instead of irritation from the weeds.............sorry for the rant, but should I be taking better care of my dog? Or should I see a vet where they see more of the hunting breed instaed of the sweater wearing verity???????????? If you cant tell, I am pretty worked up about this !@#$%^&*

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I wouldn't worry about it as long you know you are taking care of your dog. Everytime I go hunting one my dogs ends up cut or rubbed raw somewhere. My vets dont say anything about it, but both of them have hunting dogs. Maybe you should put a sweater/boots on the lab next time you go in and see what happens. wink

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I think you should just find a new vet, make a few calls and find one that has some knowledge of hunting dogs and not just yuppy puppys.

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Ask them what Will Steger does for his dogs then? grin

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Ya just get some more opinions or do some of your own research

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I Hunt my Labs pretty hard to noses rubbed raw and even around the eyes go bald. Havent hunted in that cold of weather because I wouldnt handle it. IF it was frostbite depending on the severity of it wouldnt be good. I would get a second oppinion just in case it was. I am sure you could tell though if it looks any worse or different front previous hunts where he has has got rubbed raw.

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I've never heard of that i mean we went pheasant hunting and the lab fell through the ice and we walked for another 30 min to 45 min and she was fine

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I can't say if you're vet knows what he's talking about or not, but your story reinforces why I think it's important to find a vet who understand working dogs. My vet breeds labs, hunts labs, and he enters and judges hunt tests and field trials. I trust him and, this being my first dog, I get great advice about how to care for hunting dogs both at home and in the field.

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Absolutely either find another vet or thank them for their opinion and leave the office. I had numerous vets tell me that I was under feeding my dog, one even threatened to turn me in because he was so thin...its just the way he always has been. I've now found a vet that owns hunting dogs and my life is much happier.

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My lab has the same problem but it is on his other end...

I hunted him last Thur. and he had bloody ice cubes hanging from his nether regions when we were done hunting the cattails. This seems to be a common occurrence but it doesn't affect his willingness to hunt. I wouldn't worry about your dogs nose unless it appears to cause some problems.

On another note, how many of us would hunt if it was our 'nether region" that had ice hanging from it?

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i know nothing really about hunting dogs. but I look at it this way. I so ice fishing and get frost bite on my hand and ears sometimes. when i work on cars and small emgines I end up cutting myself or when I weld I end up burning myself. This happends because I am working and having fun. your dog is working and having fun. I would not worry about it. because she is just out of college the humane soilaty (sp) got to her and anythin anmaimal that comes thur that door a a litte cut she thinks. Well thats abuse I should [PoorWordUsage] you too [PoorWordUsage] because you and you dog or having fun. Thats just my opion

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Never have heard of such a thing. If they could frost bite their nose why would nature have it wet all of the time even in freezing temps?

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Find a different vet. Both my labs are bleeding by the time I get done hunting them this time of year, one around the eyes and one on her paws, its just the wear and tear going thru all the cattails, brush, crusty snow, etc.

I think vets probably like the guys with hunting dogs, lots of additional visits because of the wear and tear and sharp fences. Twice I've had my four year old lab in for cuts on her chest because of a fence.

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My lab has the same problem but it is on his other end...

I hunted him last Thur. and he had bloody ice cubes hanging from his nether regions when we were done hunting the cattails.

The problem with your dog doesn't sound right, if the dog is running forward, the wear and tear should be on the front of the paws, face, chest, even the nipples, but on its butt??? THAT may need to be checked out, it may be a problem...

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Nope, not his butt, it's his sack. I'm not worried about it, I was just making the point that if it doesn't affect your dogs hunting don't worry about it.

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Ah. Poor dogs and the icicle-berries. It doesn't seem to bother my dog so much and gives him another reason to 'groom' himself as we drive to the next spot or after completed the hunt.

We have hunted our dogs for years in below freezing weather. We take breaks to make certain that they are watered and warm. No problems. Hunt on!

You can definitely tell the difference between vets who disdain hunting and those who at least show a little respect for hunters and their dogs.

On a recent SD trip, one buddie's dog got into barbed wire within 20 minutes of our first walk! We cleaned it, bandaged it and hunted on. The owner was nervous when we returned, so he phoned the vet. The first one he got was adamant about getting shots and stopping the hunt. The vet that he went to did not bother with staples or stitches because then the dog would not be able to hunt anymore. He admired our bandaging job and sent him on his way ~ no charge.

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On a recent SD trip, one buddie's dog got into barbed wire within 20 minutes of our first walk! We cleaned it, bandaged it and hunted on. The owner was nervous when we returned, so he phoned the vet. The first one he got was adamant about getting shots and stopping the hunt. The vet that he went to did not bother with staples or stitches because then the dog would not be able to hunt anymore. He admired our bandaging job and sent him on his way ~ no charge.

On our first SoDak hunt this year, and my dogs first day of hunting EVER, he got hooked up on barbed wire and got two 1.5 to 2 inch gashes on each knee. We hunted the rest of the day and I got in to see the vet early the next morning. He got 11 or 12 stitches, antibiotics and some ointment. Total cost was $137. I had forgotten my check book and he let me leave with a promise to send a check.

I asked him if my dog was done for the trip and he said as soon as the anesthesia wore off, I should hunt him. "Nothing worse than an out-of-work hunting dog during hunting season". he also told me if he threw some stitches, which he expected would happen, that I shouldn't bother coming back until I was on my way back to Minnesota. I liked that vet.

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Maybe those kind of vets move to SD so that they do not have to see so many of those lil purse dogs.

You found a good one there! He/She should be commended.

Heading to Mitchell in a few days. . .

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