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Nymph

Red-bellied Woodpecker

13 posts in this topic

This female is the queen of the suit feeder. She will come in and all the other woodpeckers will sit in the tree to wait till she is done.

redbelliedwoodpeckerst8.jpg

redbelliedwoodpecker2bx2.jpg

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They are a beautiful bird. The ones that come to my feeder are much more shy than this one seems to be.

Why are the called "Red Bellied"?

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Probably because "red headed" woodpecker was already taken. They also often have a subtle wash of rust coloring along the belly.

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Uh-oh. I better get out the bird book--guess I can't tell the male from the female. Never thought about it. Now you have me curious. Everyone else does seem to scatter when they come, don't they? I have one trying to eat thistle and chips from a tube feeder. Hard on those little holes. Thanks for posting these.

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3131158302_3c5ceb781a_o.jpg

This guy looks as though he is singing the blues, Nymph. Maybe he could use a visit with the 'little lady' who is queen of your feeders.

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There ya go. Thats a nice looking male.

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Thats one bird we don't see up here. Nice images.

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In your photo he looks to be wearing safety shields. That got me thinking about nictitating membranes. I never really thought about it much but some birds have them. Not quite sure if that is what I am seeing there or not in the picture. Interesting.

This is a quote I found.

Woodpeckers tighten their nictitating membrane a millisecond prior to their beak impacting the trunk of a tree in order to prevent their eyes from leaving their sockets.

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This is a quote I found.

Woodpeckers tighten their nictitating membrane a millisecond prior to their beak impacting the trunk of a tree in order to prevent their eyes from leaving their sockets.

Yikes! That sounds painful. Thanks for the research. That's interesting. I was disappointed that his eye was closed. However, since the background is really busy and distracting anyway, it was kind of fun to get a glimpse of more bird behavior.

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However, since the background is really busy and distracting anyway, it was kind of fun to get a glimpse of more bird behavior.

Better the background than the foreground. grin

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Eureka! Now I can say I learned something today. That's very interesting. Thanks

Mic

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