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O2Fish

Nils

54 posts in this topic

I have been needing a new auger and have decided to save up and go for the Nils. I haven't heard anything bad about them so if you guys have a bad story, let me know. Or if you think I would be better off investing in a different auger, let me hear it!! How long will it take to get shipped out?

Nils also has that new option of a shorter auger bit. I fish mainly Eastern SD and have never needed an auger extension. Will the short one be better without the extra weight and bulk? I am 6'4 so maybe I should stay with the taller one for ease of drilling?

[From Admin: Nils Master @ Outdoor Pro Store.]

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I would stick with the taller one for sure. Especially at your height.

A lot of accolades about the Nils here at HSO, for good reason. They are flat out great!

I thought about your question on what I think might be a bad thing or two, and honestly, the only thing I can come up with is that if you are running the auger into sandy, dirty, or debris filled ice, the blade will dull faster than that of a chipper style blade.

Also another negative is all your buddies will want to use it all the time smile.

If you decide to go with the Nils, you won't be disappointed and treated with care will last a very very long time.

Good luck!

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Hello O2Fish, Welcome to F/M.

I have a Nils and have nothing but great things to say about it. Sorry, no bad stories here. I'd suggest keeping the 48" shaft... it does not add all that much weight/bulk. I am curious to hear how the new 4-stroke Tanaka engine performs.

Do a search on Nils; there has been a lot of folks interested in the Nils lately and a lot of chatter on the subject.

Keep on.

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I'll have mine hopefully by weeks end, going to stop and tell the shop its sold tomarrow. Luckily I found 1 local.

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I also would say to go with the long shaft. It helps your back because your not bending over as much cutting holes. Im 6"6" and I love the extra length of my Nils.

If I have a draw back with my Nils its the sand issue like any other shaver blade. I always have a extra blade assembly along because the blade asssembly has to be ordered and few stores carry them. Oh and the blade cover could use a little tweaking but thats a very minor issue. Break it in good before drilling holes and you will be loving it.

All the positives like light weight, fast, good on gas and the extra length and the ability to use it as a hand auger wich is included outweighs any of the above mentioned things.

I wont run any other auger now that I have used my Nils for 3 years. Its been a great auger.

Oh and by the way there is no Nils 4 stroke. That was a misprint in the Ice Fishing magazing. That comes straight from the main man at Nils.

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The only downfall to owning a Nils is that your auger is going to be the " Go to Auger " which is not the worst thing but now there is no incentive for your friends use theirs. Good thing the motor life is 3 times longer then the Others. grin

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Oh and by the way there is no Nils 4 stroke. That was a misprint in the Ice Fishing magazing. That comes straight from the main man at Nils.

thanks for the clarification.. do you know what the difference is in the new engine???

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Excellent auger for sure. To get the most out nof your auger the first time on the ice you want to break you new auger in. All you need to do is un your throttle wide open and cycle your choke back and forth while doing this. It lubricates the diaphram in the carb and cuts down your break-in time. That is all you need to do, and don't run it richer than 50:1 or you will glog the jets. This was recommended by the manufacturer if the unit has been sitting in storage or boxed for a while.

Personally I like the 48" shaft as I do fish a lot of lakes where the extra length comes in handy. Also pick up an extra drill bit so if you ever need to send one in to be sharpened you won't miss a beat.

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thanks for the clarification.. do you know what the difference is in the new engine???

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I don't have brand loyalty to any of my ice gear except for my Nils Master. Everything else I would trade for something new and better but not the auger. I am 6'0 and the 48" is fine for me, especially with the center point to get it started.

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ok...so i got my nils powerhead running outside right now...i mixed this first gallon at 1.75 oz for the break in minus the extra oil that stayed in my measuring device..so probably 1.5 went in and 1.3 is what they say for a gallon...i wanted to go a little extra for the break in to lube her up good.

anyway...should i just let this bad girl sit and idle for a couple tanks or should i go out there every now n again and give it some gas?

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I have been told that when breaking in a 2-stoke motor that it is a good idea to vary the throttle often. So letting it just sit there and idle would probably not be the best break-in.

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Run your throttle wide open and cycle your choke back and forth while doing this. It lubricates the diaphram in the carb and cuts down your break-in time. That is all you need to do, and don't run it richer than 50:1 or you will glog the jets. This was recommended by the manufacturer if the unit has been sitting in storage or boxed for a while.

[From Admin: Nils Master @ Outdoor Pro Store.]

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sounds good...i just went out there and gave it gas and toggled my choke back and forth a few different times...reved it up and down for a bit too...i'll just go outside and give it some gas every now n again then...should i keep messing with the choke too or is a couple times good enough?

2.6 oz per gallon is 50:1...i only put in 1.75 and it all didn't even get in there so i think i'm good on that...i'm probably at like 80:1 or 90:1 for the break in.

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Sounds like you are doing just what I did so you should be good to go. Just remember when you get out to the lake and start cutting your first hole that you do not put any downward pressure as it will cut just fine without any and you might find that you want to apply just a slight amount of lift. It will make sense once you start cutting and cutting and cutting grin

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Now you are done, no need to burn gas. It will get faster more you use it while the rings seat properly. Check your power adapter connection, big hole on the adpater facing the flat part of the auger shaft. I put mine initially in wrong and it makes the shaft wobble a bit. When you mix your second tank I recommend AMSOIL Saber 75:1, your auger will fly thru the ice. Be carefull, it will pull down when you drill, almost tipped me over when I first used mine LOL. Have fun turning the ice into swiss cheese!

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so i'm good to go then? ran about half a tank.

let her idle,did the choke toggle a few times,reved it up, let her idle a bit, did the choke toggle, gave it gas a few different times then shut her down...should do the trick huh?

now what? just wait for enough ice to shred into swiss cheese?

forgot to mention i'm runnin the amsoil saber professional.

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Yes, you are good to go. Please wait for SAFE ice and try it as a hand auger also, you won't believe how easy it is! I don't use my power head until 12+ inches of ice.

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sweet...thanks for the advice guys...i seen some people said they just let it idle through a couple tanks and i remember seeing a post about the choke trick thats why i asked...guess i did a little of both.

don't worry jimalm i learned my lesson with my lazermag express...i got all excited and torqued the pitch on mine when it was brand new by pressing down and applying to much pressure...won't happen this time...with the upper end augers all u need to do is hit the gas.

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I would run that whole 1st tank through it and keep doing just what you are. As stated the more you run your auger the faster it will get until ya have a good 50-100 holes cut depending on ice conditions etc. Once you run another tank through at the mix you are using to break in you can go 80:1 and then finally after 1 more tank 90:1. Thats what I run mine at all the time now. 100:1 wont hurt either.

Good luck and have fun and report back your stories.

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I like to always be extreme so I burned 3 tanks the day I received mine but I was all about breaking it in. Heck I think that I still have about 590 hours to go on the life of my motor. I can only hope that I live long enough to wear it out grin

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I would run that whole 1st tank through it and keep doing just what you are. As stated the more you run your auger the faster it will get until ya have a good 50-100 holes cut depending on ice conditions etc. Once you run another tank through at the mix you are using to break in you can go 80:1 and then finally after 1 more tank 90:1. Thats what I run mine at all the time now. 100:1 wont hurt either.

Good luck and have fun and report back your stories.

yeah i was thinking of firing her up tomorrow and doing the same thing again..i don't think my neighbors would appriciate me doing it right now lol.

is my math messed up or aren't i running it right now at about between 80 and 90:1

2.6 oz is 50:1

1.3 oz is 100:1

so right around 2 would be 75:1

i put in 1.75 oz and not every last drop went in.

i got the 8 oz bottle and thats the mixing chart on the back...and the pillow packs for a gallon are 1.3....i remember seeing posts where you guys thought it was 1 oz per gallon and the extra .3 in the pillow pack was figuring because it don't all get in there but i think it really is 1.3 and they expect you to get it all in lol.

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when you guys connect the powerhead to the adaptor do you get all the threads in there so the powerhead and adaptor is flush or is there a little bit of space between there?

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