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marshmallow

"SPRING BOBBER" or "FLOAT" for panfish??

16 posts in this topic

I very much so like to watch the tiny float "THILL" etc..flip on it's side as you are slowly lowering it.. "OR" when you are just finishing fluttering down slowly to the H2O surface in the hole, the float makes a "CRISPY SNAP" about 2" inches down.. "SLAB CRAPPIES" moving in?? float flips on it's side then very slowly decends down the hole.. "SLABBER".. I on occasion, have used spring, but i still like the thrill of the "THILL".. I go light as possible for "BIG BULL BLUEGILLS"..

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I don't use either, unless I am sitting in one spot then I will bobber for eyes or crappies. 95% of the time I am just a line watcher/tight liner. The way I look at it is that is one less thing I need to have, maintain or replace. I hear what you are saying though. Something about the sight of a bobber slowly decending that gets the blood pumpin!

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I like to use a spring bobber when I'm actively jigging. Then I'll usually setup a bobber on the ol' deadstick.

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Spring bobbers are much better IMO. Way more effective and easier to use.

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Love them tiny thill with the top floating right at the surface.For crappies if it so much as twitches I bang em.But also love the thrill when it goes down a foot or two and stops.I do also use spring bobbers.I also tight line but I am too cheap to buy a decent sensitive rod.

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Both... you get two lines. I usually have a bobber rig (deadstick) and a Spring on my rig I hold.

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I for me the idea of a deadstick is letting it just sit there and watching the rods tip like on a Jason Mitchell meatstick

I use both and prefer a spring bobber to a normal float. Again I dig the JM rods because of the large eye on the spring bobber.

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I use both methods. The smaller Thill bobbers do work very well if they are set right.

Whether I use a Thill or Ice Buster bobber, I try to set the top of the bobvber so its just level with the water. That way there is no resistance for the fish to feel. If they hit up, the bobber lays flat.

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I have finally broke down and bought a rod with a spring bobber on it.Really don't know why as my UL rod seemed to work pretty well the last three years. For my deadstick I have it sitting on a rod rocker. I give it a bump now and then for motion. For Walleye I use a airplane jig with minnow, give it a push every few minutes. Works for Walleye, northern. For Crappie I use a Genz Bug with minnow.

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I like spring bobbers when im actively jigging tight lipped fish and a small bobber like thill or a perfectly trimmed ice buster that sits just above the water for my second rod if im not moving alot

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I don't use bobbers for open water or ice. I personally prefer the challenge of using my jigging technique as my primary means for getting them to come in and bite. If the bite is very light, then I will use my spring bobber rods(s).

Not in the budget right now, but in another year or two I plan to give a noodle rod a try. Was at Throne Brothers today looking at one ... man those things seem so fragile, the tip is so thin.

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marshmallow,you answered your own question.If you like floats,then go for it.Me I'll stick to a JM spring bobber.That's about as light as it gets. grin

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One rod with a spring for me. Not enough time to set up two rods because I'm moving in five minutes if I don't see anything. Finicky biters can be hard to detect with the Thills also, and they aren't always going to be at the depth you are set at if you're jigging. That being said, I have had times where the quivering, set in place bobber shake is the only method that works.

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As COACH 1310 said I am also a tightliner all the way. If you have a good rod and setup this is the answer, as stated less to worry about and very productive. I also am a firm beleiever in useing yellow stren, I watch for the slightest twitch in the line and whamo game on!

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I was fishing crappies on a Northern Metro lake last year with a buddy that didn't have a spring bobber or flasher. After several "colorful" remarks from him, I let him use the flasher. I still out fished him 3-1 because I could detect the upward bite on the spring. His bobber just sat motionless. Now, he wasn't using Icebusters. I've had great luck with those when they lay flat. That's always fun to see :-)

I'm a firm believer in these things! When Reeds was practically giving away the St. Croix legends, I bought 4. Along with my Thorn Bros. pannie rod, these are by far my favorit!

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I went to spring bobbers a couple of seasons ago, couldn't believe the bites I was missing.

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