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loc9fisher

i kicked a buck off his bed, will he come back?

6 posts in this topic

i'm an inexperienced bow hunter, but i was out this morning and i kicked a buck off his bed. he was bedded down with a doe.

i was driving out and he was bedded down right next to the drive way, when i passed him with my truck he got up. when i saw him i stopped, got out, and grabbed my bow. as i pulled the bow out of the truck, the doe got up. when she got up they jumped the ditch they were next to and trotted about 30 yards away, stopped and looked at me for a few seconds and casually trotted away.

the questions are, will he come back, how long should i wait to hunt him again, can i go back this afternoon, do i hunt him in this same bedding area or try to get him somewhere else?

thanks...........

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With the doe's in heat, that buck will be wherever the hot does lead him. Pretty hard to pattern a buck during rut as they will run from hot doe to another.

If he is still bedding in that area, I personally would leave it sit for a minimum of one week. If you go in to early and you jump him again, it will be see you later and he will probably not return. Wait a week and then hunt it when the wind is right for that spot.

If you have seen him in this area before in the past week, you could through caution in the wind and set up for a days sit and see what happens as you never know when he might travel by again if he is a nicer sized buck.

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With the doe's in heat, that buck will be wherever the hot does lead him. Pretty hard to pattern a buck during rut as they will run from hot doe to another.

If he is still bedding in that area, I personally would leave it sit for a minimum of one week. If you go in to early and you jump him again, it will be see you later and he will probably not return. Wait a week and then hunt it when the wind is right for that spot.

If you have seen him in this area before in the past week, you could through caution in the wind and set up for a days sit and see what happens as you never know when he might travel by again if he is a nicer sized buck.

The one thing you have going for you at this time is the rut. He is as dumb as he is going to get.

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not to contradict anyone, but it's my guess that was not "his bed", rather just where he happened to be while he was with the hot doe.

when not influenced by hot ladies, mature bucks tend to be loners, bedding in there own secretive location.

this was a temporary setup.

keep after him. he aint far.

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Typically, when you startle or spook a deer with a vehicle, it does not seem to put them off their patterns all that much. keep in mind I am refering to a highway, driveway, township road, etc. If this was along a field road or another path that does not normally have regular vehicle traffic, then there may be an issue.

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Jigglestick is spot-on. That buck was bedded with a doe, and I am betting that close to the driveway it wasn't her "bedding-area" either. She was tired from the chase, and laid down. He laid down with her. Also, as harvey lee indicated, during the rut, pinpointing a buck's movement is liking picking the winning Powerball numbers.., good luck. In fact, that buck is likely not even a "resident" buck from that area.., his core area may be a mile or more away. So don't worry about hunting that spot. In fact, I would be right back in there. If that doe is in estrous, she is likely to attract bucks for the next couple days.., and as they chase her around..., she could pull that buck, or a new one, right past your stand.

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