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TMF89

Which's Warmer?

11 posts in this topic

Which's warmer? Layers with no air space between them, or layers with air to warm up? For example, I wear three pairs of socks, short cotton, long cotton, and wool, and my boots, but they're packed so tight I can BARELY wiggle my toes, with no room for toe warmers. They'll stay cold throughout the day, like warm to cool, or sometimes downright cold. I'm wondering if I took out a layer of socks, to give it some air, would it warm up quicker? Same question for gloves, hats, and everything else.

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Loose the cotton socks. Silk or pollypro socks with a wool, wool blend, or other heavy sock over those. Something that will still insulate when wet.

No air = No warmth. Your feet sweat on you walk out. Cotton looses all of its insulating power when wet. Top that with no air space you hold heat, and you midas well have tenishoes on.

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Having tight fit in a boot when trying to stay warm is the single worst thing there is. Everything should be a little loose in your boots. That will allow blood circulation which will keep your feet warm. You also need air pockets to keep warm.

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Back in the day, the thought was to wear the heaviest pair of wool socks and stuff your foot into a pair of sorels. It failed miserably. I can remember trying to walk out on those frozen blocks. Worst part was the burning sensation when I finally got them off and into some heat. Agree with gspman and neighborguy, make sure you have some space. Hands/gloves same thing. Hat, not as critical, just something decent that will keep body heat from escaping. Also, a good gaiter also helps keep your whole body warmer.

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I have found polar fleece to be quite warm when used in layers, polar fleece is also fast drying. The whole insulation deal is that you trap air and that warms up and then keeps you warm. Foam insulation does the same thing, insulation has tiny tiny little air bubbles. Deer hair is hollow in order to trap air. I have tried a new setup this year where I have under armour cold gear as my first layer, then I have polar fleece long underwear on. I thought it worked well but no matter what the wind will cut right through you so adding a good wind blocking layer will work wonders. Like everybody else use a loose fitting boot. Right now I wear a light moisture wicking sock then my regular wool socks, I have a pair of knee high rubber boots with 1200 grams of insulation, the problem is that theres nothing on the bottom to insulate. I'm going to try some heavier duty boots next year because I sit on stand a lot.

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Definitely lose the cotton. Cotton holds water instead of releasing it or transferring it away from the skin. Damp socks mean cold feet.

Also, you need the air space for insulation. Its that dead air space that creates the insulating effect. I wear 1 poly-pro sock and then a wool sock of varying thickness depending on how much insulation I need.

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I guess it's two words blush .........under armour

Since I quit being a cheapo and bought the stuff (and got the right fit), I haven't been cold since. Get the shirts, socks, gloves(haven't tried yet but will), hat (wear under your normal stocking hat), face mask(hood) or neck gaiter.

Wear the shirts with wool or fleece over that and a good windproof/waterproof jacket on top.

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Rubber is a horrible insulator. Go with a leather boot or find pack boots with a layer of insulation molded in the sole. The air space is critical. On winter camping trips in the artic they use spacers under the felt that look like a plastic mesh. The moisure freezes to this mesh and not on the insulation layer.

Chemical hand warmers also oxygen to work properly. So if you use them in a boot you have to leave a big enough air space to wiggle your toes and pump fresh are to the chemical pack.

I do calf raises while on stand. Pump out a hundred and you would be amazed how it warms you up. Do them slow and behind screaning and deer won't ever detect it.

I like polypro liners under a real wool sock in a pack boot. I have tried polar fleece socks on two occasions and both times the heal wore through on a new pair after only a day of hunting. I go three bills-they might work better for a lighter person. Hans

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A good way to keep your feet warm is to keep your head and neck warm as well by wearing a neck gaiter, facemask, and sometimes even two stocking caps.

As you lose heat through your head, your body's natural function is to keep your brain at 98.6 degrees, so in turn the first areas to lose blood flow are your toes and fingers.

I didn't believe it would work that well, but it does. I only wear 1 pair of +/-85% merino wool socks and 1000 gram boots down to 0 degrees. I also only wear a light pair of gloves.

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i hope you get the idea of wearing a loose fitting boot. when buying them, get them a size big to allow for heavier socks. When you make the mistake i made rifle opener, socks don't matter.

it had rained all week prior, and my stand is located 1/2 mile down at the end of a chisel-plowed field. so i wore my rubber boots from bow hunting so i wouldn't get my good setters all mudded up. and mud, i mean 6 inches of mush. but, being too excited to get to the stand, i never checked the weather before leaving the yard. temps had dropped a bit from the day before. strong northwest wind, of which in my face, snow on the ground, and in the low teens. guess what, that mud was frozen solid, and 4 hours later, so were my feet. I mean FROZEN. the boots aren't insulated, just cheap rubber boots. i had to wait 1/2 hour for them to warm up enough so i could get my feet out. they were stiff. let alone, i was only wearing one pair of hanes cotton socks.

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Yep, first layer is a thin ploy. or silk sock followed by a second Wool/wool blend sock and then the boots. I have 1000 gram Rockies that I've used for about 5 years now solely for deer hunting. If really cold, I'll drag the boot blankets out to the stand and wear those over the boots. In the -15 or so temps about 6 years ago, I sat all day and was fine. Also go to Saskatchewan and am fine.

Gloves, I just use a thin "liner" type glove and stick my hands into a muff type warmer. No heat packs for me. My fingies are just fine.

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