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fishorgolf

flyfishing trip advise

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I have a friend who really likes to flyfish for trout and I told him that I would do a trip with him this year. I am more of a walleye guy myself with a limited knowledge of flyfishing destinations so I am wondering if anyone would have some suggestions for a great trip. I am thinking Montana, Idaho, etc. Any ideas?

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There is a fairly recent article in sportsafield or outdoor life about 2 guys in montana flyfishing on 150$/day they fished the yellowstone, madison,missouri and several others-the article listed places to eat, hotels and flyshops. I went out to visit my bro in helena last june and had a ball in montana. It'll be expensive but you can't go wrong with alaska. If you wanted to stay local you could go steelheading in mn, mi or wi. If your into camping , I also heard good things about hiking into mtn lakes on eth wind river range of wy and the bighorn mtns, black hills have trout as well. Doh! now I'm jealous-so much water so little time....

redhooks

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North Fork of the Shoshone in Cody, Wyoming is where I would go. Nothing more fun than fishing in a river while standing on fresh grizzly tracks. The scenery cant be beat, right between Cody and Yellowstone NP. Over 40 miles of public access in the Shoshone National Forrest which borders up to Yellowstone and a good number of public access between Cody and Shonshone National Forrest. This river picks up late summer with dry flies and is a true western river in all aspects.

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That North Fork of the Shoshone trip sounds good to me! I have been to MT almost yearly to fish for the last 10. Mostly fall or winter. One trip in early July too. The most expensive part of my trips is getting there. Daily cost once there has been cheap for me. I camp whenever possible and have never had a guide. I have tried to pick rivers I can wade.

I base out of Bozeman and fish the Gallatin and Madison mostly. I try to get over to Rock Creek by Missoula for at least a couple days. Spending time wading and exploring those 3 streams alone can kill a week quickly. Last year I had a chance to hike up the Yellowstone and that was fantastic. The Yellowstone is to deep to really wade fish much of it. That is what you have to know before you go is are you planning on wading or driftboat fishing or both and that can help you pick streams. No matter what you'll find some fish and it will be a great trip.

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If you've never been to Yellowstone National Park, GO! It's amazing, and is considered a fly fisherman's mecca. My wife and I went to summers ago, and had a blast fishing rivers all across the park. We went in August, and the Trout were gorging themselves on our grasshopper patters, and copper john trailers.

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Make sure you are aware fo the fun-off conditions it can RUIN a trip, trust me I know!

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Backpack fly fishing is my favorite. We backpack into the wilderness every year. Wind river range in WY is great fishing and scenery. There are big fish too. We don't waste much time on the rivers, the big fish are in the lakes. three years ago we caught 30 brookies over 16 inches, up to 21. several rainbows and cuttthrout up to 22, and a brown about 17. this Isn't mentioning the hundreds of fish in the 6-14 inch range.

If a lot of hiking turns you off, this isn't the trip for you. we averaged 60-90 miles on the trips to get into pristine waters and back, with lots of rugged terrain and bushwacking.

Otherwise we have done drive trips. we go out west, drive and stop at diferent places. the madison, yellowstone, galitin, yellowstone park are all good places to fish. If you go to yellowstone park during the salmon fly hatch it is some of the best fishing you will ever experience. The fish are huge and they gorge themselves. I believe the hatch is in june/july If I recall correctly.

I hope this helps.

-andrew

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Backpack fly fishing is my favorite. We backpack into the wilderness every year. Wind river range in WY is great fishing and scenery. There are big fish too. We don't waste much time on the rivers, the big fish are in the lakes. three years ago we caught 30 brookies over 16 inches, up to 21. several rainbows and cuttthrout up to 22, and a brown about 17. this Isn't mentioning the hundreds of fish in the 6-14 inch range.

If a lot of hiking turns you off, this isn't the trip for you. we averaged 60-90 miles on the trips to get into pristine waters and back, with lots of rugged terrain and bushwacking.

Otherwise we have done drive trips. we go out west, drive and stop at diferent places. the madison, yellowstone, galitin, yellowstone park are all good places to fish. If you go to yellowstone park during the salmon fly hatch it is some of the best fishing you will ever experience. The fish are huge and they gorge themselves. I believe the hatch is in june/july If I recall correctly.

I hope this helps.

-andrew

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