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Powerstroke

Bibs or coveralls for COLD weather

14 posts in this topic

I was wondering what the consensus is on layering on the bottom for cold weather. Do you wear bibs or do people like the coveralls?

I've always had to buy my own hunting clothes (I'm only 28) so I've gotten what I can when I can. I have always worn pants instead of bibs cause they were cheaper.

Now I think its finally time for me to buy something dedicated to cold weather and late season hunting like muzzy and bow hunting. I sit on stand mostly so I need something that will keep me warm when I'm not moving.

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last yr i went to fleet farm and bought mountain prarie orange coat and bibs i think the coat was 80 and bibs like 70 they were on sale right b4 hunting i love them i havent gotten cold yet.i wear long johns,then camo pants,then my bibs. for top i wear under armour shirt w/ a long sleeve then a pullover and my coat now i just need to find a pair of boots so my feet dont get cold cuz thats the reason i would have to leave the woods

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Your outer layer does you no good if you're not layered properly against your skin. I can without a doubt say that the compression fit under armour cold gear is the best money I have ever spent on any type of clothing for cold weather hunting. It was cold this weekend, but I sat from dawn to dusk Sat and Sunday. That stuff is the best invention since the wheel. Forget regular long underware, fleece, cotton anything - under armour cold gear is the only thing I will wear under my hunting clothes for as long as it is available. It is pricey in the stores - (roughly about 120 bucks for a set) but I got a set off [YouNeedAuthorization] for $80 2 weeks ago, brand new, still in the bag with tags. After that layer, I had a fleece layer, then bibs, and my coat. Your original question - go with bibs, it allows you much more flexibility with layering your upper body than a set of coveralls do. Coveralls to me feel too restrictive.

Trust me man, it is worth every single penny. You will not regret it.

Oh - the HSOforum I named that is being blocked is the one with 4 letters that starts with an E and you bid on stuff. smile

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my bottom long johns are the same as under armour only knock off guide series brand

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I am a bib kinda person. I like be able to take them off if I need to do some long distance walking.

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I do plenty of layering which is how I've gotten by so far. I also love the underarmour. I use it winter camping. I have a 4n1 parka that I use, but I'm trying to decide on what piece to buy for late season.

I bought the Cabelas Saskatchewan Pac Boots. They have are insulated and have a removable liner so you can customize your insulation. They are also a soft "gaiter-style" top so they are easy to hike in. Extremely warm and I like that I can pull the liners to dry them.

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my bottom long johns are the same as under armour only knock off guide series brand

They aren't the same then - I have both , the guide series brand doesn't compare to UA - IMO. wink I will probably not ever wear the guide series brand again.

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I like the bibs better. They seem more versatile than coveralls. You can wear them with a sweatshirt somedays or a heavy jacket on others. Seems easier for layering. I guess I like to get clothes that I can use for more than one thing.

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I have to disagree with both coveralls and bibs as I have worn both over the years and have settled back on DryPlus, insulated wool pants. A pair of compression thermals (UA are good in my opinion, but there are also cheaper options that are just as good) and the pants and I have sat in a blind from sun up to sun down in the UP and hunted in CO where you are on your feet all day.

I guess if I had to choose coveralls or bibs I would go bibs as they tend to give you a little more flexibility with layering and shedding those layers. But I do like my insluated Carhart coveralls for working in the unheated garage in the winter..........boy, I'm all over the page grin It has taken me a long time to find the perfect layering system for my particular body, but now that I have, I will never look back. I guess it's just important to wear whatever makes you comfortable and keeps you warm.

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When temps during deer season could be 70 to -20 degrees a person is going to need a lot of flexibility in the orange dept.

Then theres the walk into and out of the stand to consider.

Layering while out hunting or on the ice. I make it simple by adding a layer on top rather then shedding a jacket or bibs to put a layer on or take a layer off.

Coveralls, offer the least amount of flexibility if your putting layers under them. They restrict movement to begin with, now add another layer under them and your running out of room. When will the design department figure out that a guy needs more room in the shoulders and arms and not the gut when they go up one size? For that reason I'll use bibs and a jacket as my added top layer.

I have no insulated orange jackets, bibs or coveralls, they're all shells of quite material, which means in most cases I've seen with orange hunting clothes the wind will blow right through.

This gives me that flexibility and while keeping the cost down because I'm using the clothes I already own for the layers and I'll have a jacket and bibs that cut the wind.

Typically I'll have the orange(shell)coveralls with enough layers under to make a walk in comfortable or to hunt all day in with moderate temps, keeping in mind those layers won't be coming off. I'll use the same when its colder but once on stand I'll add a jacket/orange shell on top and bibs if need be.

I might leave those top layers in my stand or I'll pack them in. In extreme cold I've have all that on and wrapped in a sleeping bag that stays in the stand.

So anyway this years Opener was on the cold and windy side.

I had brought out the arsenal of cold weather gear and orange shells and laid out on the floor. I went about putting together a combination that would work. Ahh, but I have a youngster coming along to think about. One that grew a few inch's from last year. Instead of outfitting him again with expensive insulated orange that he'll out grow, we adapted the orange shells to his warm weather gear.

Sat morning as we headed out the door for opening day.

A light bulb went off in my head as I walked past my new camo Arctic Armor hanging in the cloths hook. Warm and quite jacket and bibs that cut the wind to put on once I got into the stand. Add a orange vest and I'm set.

Anyway being flexible with layering I don't sweat getting to or from the stand and can stay warm when I get there.

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I like the underarour wear, you can find all the layers you need online after the season for almost half the price. Start looking in January and February. I bought all of mine last year at a very good price.

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I'm definitely all for bibs for a couple reasons. First off if you start walking around it's nice to lose the jacket and just go with a sweatshirt and bibs. Also when you dressing the deer it's tough to do with a coat on in my opinion. But most importantly, bibs offer the most ease when "nature calls" smile

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doowap has it, doesn't take long in the cold with a bladder full of coffee. Coveralls don't seem to fit every guy the same, also on the drive back to home base I like to take off my jacket(s)I can get by leaving the bibs on and gutting your deer, it's nice to hang your blaze orange above or near you for others to see just in case, i don't want to keep changing in and out of coveralls for each deer I need to clean.

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