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Scott K

Extra protein for hunting?

9 posts in this topic

Someone told me to give a hunting dog extra protein during hunting season, and when it is cold out for extra energy. He said he just adds a spoonfull of protein supplement like body builders use to their dog food every day. Has anyone heard of doing this? I have usually just gave the dog some cooked meat scraps or a can of dog food every couple days before, but I never heard of adding protein supplement that body builders use. I am afraid this may harm the dog somehow. What do you think?

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National makes a powder product that you can put on your food. I'm not sure where you can find it, might have to look on line.. I've used it before and I liked it, great to feed on extended hunts. I probably would'nt use the human stuff with out further research.

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Extra protein can be hard on the kidneys. Protein won't give your dog extra energy in the cold. Not what protein does. You would be looking at carbs to boost energy. Consult with a vet before doing any additives. Buy a good food and stick with that... bump it up 20% a few days before an extended hunt. That is always a safe bet.

Good Luck!

Ken

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I am feeding her DIAMOND NATURAL rice and lamb, she doesnt eat much, never has. I can fill her bowl, (about a half gallon ice cream pale) it will last her about 3 days. She is a medium sized dog about 65 lbs. I thought the protein thing was strange.

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Labs, thought we had this discussion last year about energy bars and you were going to check with a vet? To the best of my knowledge, dogs derive energy from fat vs. carbs as humans do. Strongly agree with the high quality food and adjust quantity to activity level.

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carbs and fat basically work the same... the fat breaks down into sugars when digested... burning fay off the body is not as efficient and is not nessacaily good thing.

I talked to my vet. just never got to chat with you... the carb energy bars do work. The vets still use simple sugars to help hypoglycemic dogs and those that are hypothermic. So carbs are safe, they do work, but are shorter lived bursts. The fat in a high quality food is a slower longer lasting energy source.

So if you are looking for a quick pick me up between fields, go ahead agive them a bar... but ultimatley conditioning and good food will be the mainstay.

Good Luck!

Ken

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One of the reasons I will never free feed a dog. I want my dogs beegging to eat, they eat at the same time every day and I can adjust their intake based on body composition, season and specific physical requirements.

Mos free fed dogs are 'lazy' eaters as there is always food available. Scheduled feeders never turn their nose up to food and alwys clean their bowls every night.

Good Luck!

Ken

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Labs,

The "free" feed dog comment holds so true. I grew up with "free" feed dogs and their dish was always full. My current dog is a schedule feed dog - he has never had a food dish in his kennel ever (only water). When I feed he in the AM and PM, he can not wait to eat and it is gone instantly (almost too quick). It keeps him at a consistent weight and I have never had an issue with him eating while on extended hunting trips.

I totally believe in the scheduled feedings and I believe it is the answer to having a dog that will eat "better".

Another good thing about dogs fed on a schedule. When their bowl is not emptied - there is something wrong. It provides a good indicator for when you need to monitor them for health issues.

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My vet recommended feeding more the night before the hunt and the night after the hunt. I give him half to two thirds of normal the morning of the hunt to prevent bloat. I use a good quality dogfood that contains quality protein, which I think makes a difference. I am a timed feeder twice a day, morning and dinner time. Its worked pretty well and is similar to what a marathon runner would do. I don't think additional protein is necessarily required in a normal dog.

I agree that using the food dish is definitely an indicator of problems. Plus my lab "reminds me" when its time for him to eat, by staring at me or putting his head on my lap. Its pretty funny actually, and he is like clockwork!

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