Guests - If You want access to member only forums on HSO. You will gain access only when you sign-in or Sign-Up on HotSpotOutdoors.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
AaronM

Arrows for recurve

11 posts in this topic

How does one go about finding the correct arrow for your recurve? The archery places I've been to don't allow you to test different arrows out. I'm shooting an older Ben Pearson 45#. Is there a general rule of thumb out there? Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lookin for wood,alum? try a range ask if ya could try their practice arrows,explain yourself and maybe buy a half doz. from them.After testing.

I use the same alum.arrows as I use for my 13 yr old compound.Arrow selection isn't as much of a science as new compounds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What's your draw length? If it is 28" or more I'd go with 55-60spine. If it is shorter go with 50-55 spine

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I started to get into trad I too shot a 45# pearson recurve. I would look at 2016 aluminum shafts first. I also had some success with 2113's. But for me the 2016 were the way to go.....

Ok, so I looked back at my notes, took a minute to find it. Out of my 45# pearson I shot 2113 easton shafts. They were noted to be brittal (sp) often breaking rather than bending. I switched to the 2016 legacy shafts because they shot well out of both my 50 and 45# bows. The 2016's held up to a lot more abuse and lasted longer.

Hope this helps. Good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now ya mention it neighbor I also am using the 2016.I like wood but once a shaft broke and went through the web between my thumb and first finger ouch! never used wood shafts again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FishFrenzy--What is your draw length? And what weight head do you plan on using?

like others have said, the 2016 and 2113 should both work.. the 2016 has thicker walls to the shaft and would be more durable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's a place called 3 rivers (which you can google), and they sell "test kits" which enable you to buy a dozen or so arrows of different spines, so that you can figure out which ones shoot the best for you. Unfortunately, however, these are carbon or wood arrows, not aluminum. I like carbon arrows - they are pretty durable and shoot great out of a recurve.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FishFrenzy--What is your draw length? And what weight head do you plan on using?

like others have said, the 2016 and 2113 should both work.. the 2016 has thicker walls to the shaft and would be more durable.

My draw length is 28 inches, not sure on the head weight yet, still trying to figure out the arrow situation. I'll look into the 2016's...thanks for the tips! Do any of you cut your arrows down?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

different grain tip and cut to length will change the spine as well. Play around with it, I shoot carbon xpress ultimas out of my Jordan Stalker takedown both 55# and 70# limbs with different lengths. You are best off planning on shooting a 100 gn broadhead minimum and the longer your fletchings the quicker it will stabilize which is more important with recurves. Also remember to get feathers not vanes. Good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is the information I typed into the Easton shaft selector.. 45lbs 29" arrow, 125gr head..

here is what they suggested.

2312

2215

2117

for carbon they suggested 400 series.

and I always have my arrows cut to fit me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dietz,

Not trying to call you out, but....

The charts tend to work well for compound shooters. But for some reason they tend to be several sizes to large for recurve/longbow shooters. I am not sure why, but that is how it seems to be.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0