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Christopher Quast

How far to lead a deer running with a 12 guage? 3 scenarios

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I have always wondered this with any gun I have ever used while out hunting. I have heard anything from a full body length to aim right on. What has worked best for you with these 2 scenarios.

1. Your buddies make a drive and out run a deer at 75yds away at full tilt

2. one comes out on a gallop or trot if you will across a plowed field

3 one runs out full tilt in front of you at 50yds or less

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I spend to much time duck hunting because i cant seem to hit a deer thats standing still, but get it running and its down. My last 2 deer were both running full tilt when i got them with the 12 guage. I use a holo sight and place the sight on level with the middle of the body swing out front and pull the trigger. I wish I could tell you how far I led them but I never really have time to think about it. One minute they were running and the next is like holy carp I dropped it! I hit both slightly high of center and about halfway back. The shots took out the use of their back legs. I would have to say the lead was less then a full body though and between 50 and 70 yards. One straight across and the other had a slight quartering angle coming towards me. Both in open, plowed fields.

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Try this. Pull up and draw on them.A big bark from deep down in the gut.It echoes, they get confused,they stop and you shoot them in the face.It has worked every time from the age of 14.No tracking,no meat waste,sometimes they go down so fast you think you missed them.If they don't stop I let them go.

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I agree meatfish, the problem of how much to lead a running deer is solved by not shooting at a running deer.

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The problem with the questions is there is no definate answer. It all depends on angle and the way you shoot. Most of the time with about a 75 yard shot at a crossing deer is going to be about a 5-6 foot lead if it is a perfect crossing shot. The one on a trot probally a 2 foot lead. The 50 yard shot is going to be about a 3-4 foot lead. BUT if there is ANY angle you are going to have to adjust that. It also depends on if you stop your swing. I shot 4 deer on the run last year. 3 in the boiler room and one in the neck. It is mostly instinct for me. I am just a decent shot with deer on the run.

Froggy

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1.) I would not shoot with a shotgun

2.) Watch where the slug hits the dirt and adjust as needed

3.) To many factors involved.

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Deer are running full tilt- let them go.

Deer are on a trot- take the shot.

Hey- I made a ryme.

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ditto dont take the shot on a deer running full tilt not enough time to adjust on whats behind the deer.

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It's like bird shooting -lead and swing through the shot-don't stop and shoot.

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If its open area:

1. Aim for its nose (but I probably wouldn't shoot, those deer are usually booking and 75 yards turns into 100 yards super quick)

2. Aim in front of the shoulder, or yell like a doe bleat to get it to stop.

3. Aim at the front of the shoulder. If its really close, aim right at the boiler room and KEEP swinging.

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So we have a whole bunch of ideas on how to do this, the reality is that if you havent practiced this kind of shot (rolling tires down a hill would be a way to do it), then you shouldnt ethically take the shot. Not having any idea where to shoot means that no shot should be attempted under those conditions. If, however, you put in time practicing to the point you can confidently make the shot, then go ahead.

Shooting at the nose?? Huh? the slug isnt going to drop a foot or more in that distance....AND be 2-3 feet back??

Here is why this question cannot be answered with the info given. Lets look at some of the variables:

1. how fast is the slug? they vary from 1400 fps to over 2000 fps. BIG difference.

2. what type of sighting system? Scope vs iron sights vs a bead make a big difference.

3. Completely broadside or a slight angle? Maybe after a few steps a bigger angle.

4. Bounding or runnging flat?

5. Shooting position? Rest or offhand?

6. Out of breath or calm and collected.

7. Been watching the deer come, plenty of time to prepare or are you surprised?

8. Familiar with your firearm? how much does it drop (if any) at that distance? WHERE IS THE FIREARM SIGHTED IN AT?

9. Wind?

10 Any cover that you have to shoot around?

11. completely safe to shoot or is there a house or person potentially in the background?

As you can see, the decision is very complex and any one of these factors could result in a wounded deer (this situation could easily result in a gutshot deer). So my advice, unless you know all the variables and have practiced a similar shot with success, let it go. Or as someone suggested, bleat or grunt and get it to stop.

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It's like bird shooting -lead and swing through the shot-don't stop and shoot.
Yep your wife has been tryin to teach ya that since that last deer you missed and she dropped sickcoolcry To bad there are no shorts wearin smilies

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I never asked if I should shoot at a running deer or not did I?

As usual somebody get this topic way off subject again

Most of my shots are at running deer just because we dont have big woods around here to hunt. It is all small pieces with a ton of cropland and not some honeyhole where the deer just saunter by.

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depending on distance, speed and angle but 1/2 a length to even with the tip of the nose

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My great grandpa always said to aim for the nose on a running deer.

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Whats speed of slug? Slow as a 22 at 1300 fps divid that down about 400 yds a sec, = 100 yds 1/4 sec. In my guesstimate not much lead, inches if that,but like juneau stated keep that muzzle movin on target.

How fast are the slugs yer usin?

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1. Deer1, Answer: Don't shoot, because you don't know where your buddies is at.

2. Deer2, Look back at Deer1, Answer: Same as for Deer1's answer.

3. Deer3, Look back at Deer2 then Deer1. Answer: Same as for Deer1's answer.

Conclusion: I don't even shoot at a deer that is not giving me a broadside shot or a good enough kill shot. Why would you shoot at a running deer, that is not giving you any kind of a shot?

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GOLDTIP,

you asked some questions and you got people's best, well-meaning answer. Every response I have seen is on topic. You asked for opinions and got them. Bottom line is, if you haven't practiced you have no place shooting at running deer like that. You may not want to hear that, but stop and think about it. An ethical hunter only takes shots he/she knows he/she can make. If you don't even know where to aim you shouldnt take that shot. As I tried to explain, there are no answers to your questions as there is not enough info. We could play "what if" here for hours and still not have the right answer. the only answer is practice. Good luck to you and I hope you get a big one that stands still for just a second....

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This would be my answer.

1. Probably 3-4 feet in front of it.

2. Nose or on it depending on gallop or trot.

3. Pretty much right on it, to the front end.

Many of the deer I've shot running have been in lanes in the woods. I never swing there. I just hold in the lane where they're going to come in & shoot when they get there. That's served me very well.

If you hold on the upper part of the deer, you have a very good chance of breaking it's back if your lead is wrong. That may require a follow up shot, but they won't be moving very fast for that one.

I've shot & also missed a lot of running deer in my life. You will lose some of those, but there's been a lot of times over the years with our party if nobody would have shot at running deer we'd have been lucky to get a couple for 10+ people.

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Codydawg, NOBODY can practice EVERY shot situation. How do you hunt anything, or do you not shoot at ducks, pheasants, etc... that don't launch themselves perfectly like they do out of the trap house, or do you make sure you ground swat them all? The guy asked a question, give him a break. Man, I have killed many deer on the run at distances of 50 to 75 yards. When they break from the woods, they are usually on a sprint during deer season down here. At any rate, you have to lead them and swing.

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I shoot a running deer just like a flying pheasant or duck, swing through and pull the trigger when you cross the head (birds) or vitals (deer) the key is to keep swinging while you pull the trigger.

As to those who say they wouldn't shoot a running deer, good for you. But I can and do prepare for a running shot, I know the area I will be shooting into is clear or hazards and I anticipate what a deer will do when in enters this area. Just like when a pheasant sudenly flushes you do not stop and think and analize what to do and if it is safe to shoot, that is all done before hand and constantly adjusted while your hunting.

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Whatever. I wish I could shoot at a running deer sometimes, it has got to be a heck of a lot easier with a shotgun than a rifle with a scope. When I pull up on a deer that is moving pretty good, it is hard enough to find the animal in the scope before trying to figure out where to shoot at it. As long as you are 100 percent sure there is no one in danger of the shot, give er

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