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CodyDawg

How to tell does and fawns apart

23 posts in this topic

It is pretty easy to identify individual bucks, but I figured out a pretty good way to identify does and fawns. It isnt foolproof, but it is pretty accurate. Simply, the tail. There is an unbelievable difference in the tails. Some are big, some are little, some have a lot of black, some have none. Pay attention and you will be amazed. Just thought I would pass this along for those long hours on stand coming up.

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The best way I found was to compare the length of nose to the size of the ears. IMO the does nose is way longer on a doe in comparison to a fawns.....

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Yeah, nose works well for me too. Short and fuzzy and you got a little girl...long and slender...well...freezer filler!!

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I look at the neck size. Fawns necks are so skinny compared to freezer fillers!

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I look at the nose and the size of the ears too. and look at there backs does will start to have a slump in there back vs a fawn where its pretty strait. if you have binocs look for a buttom buck on the top of the head.

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I always look at the face/nose like other have said, those fawns have those short little faces.

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I think he means telling one doe apart from another. Like to know if the doe you saw last night is the same one you saw this morning.

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I just use my paintball gun. Different colors for different deer. Multiple sightings get multiple hits. I've never seen deer move so fast... lol grin

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Does, fawns, they all eat the same! smile

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Shoot the girls and women but let the little boys live!

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Does, fawns, they all eat the same! smile

No, fawns are more tender!

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yup, nose for me as well. The Mrs. Deer I shot last year had a nose so long I almost had to laugh. It must grow longer as they age??

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Yep boys, you are all on the wrong trail here. I meant how to tell individual does from each other. The tail is the key. Some of you bow hunters try this over the next few days and chime in. It really is amazing.

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I knew what you ment CD. I am gonna see how it works

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usually i know what doe it is before i even get a good look at her. idk what it is. i pay alot of attention to the times each one comes out and what comes out with it but i will for sure try the tail technique

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I usually just look at the nose and neck too..

Shoot the younger tender one for the frig.. Leave the old mature to breed.. thats my thoughts.. =P

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How do you keep the abundance of older does around if you shoot the young ones all the time. QDM is not just shooting young does, you have to have an equal amount of each.

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The other cue is behavioral. This time of year, male fawns are being displaced by antlered males. Thus, buttons are killed at disproportional rates (compared to female fawns) because they're out wandering alone for the first time in their short lives. In other words, there is no reliable size reference so they often look bigger than they really are. The take home is be careful with single antlerless deer because it just might be a button buck.

Also, take a good look between the ears, there might be little tufts of hair.

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Quote:
In other words, there is no reliable size reference so they often look bigger than they really are. The take home is be careful with single antlerless deer because it just might be a button buck.

Well said. I learned that lesson a few years back. Take some extra time with the scope or binocs before squeezing the trigger, especially in open areas such as field.

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Last year I decided to eat all fawns as the meat was so much tastier. I shot 4, but alas in the late evening light I finally messed up and took a button buck. I grimaced with each tender bite smile

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