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Reynolds

My first bow, any tips on what to look for?

12 posts in this topic

I have decided that I am going to buy a bow for the first time and I am looking for some suggestions as to what brands and models and any other factors that I should be aware of. I intend to use the bow for target shooting for the time being. I recently found out there is an archery range nearby that has tree stands out in the woods and various targets, which I thought was very intriguing. Also, I am left handed, so I may be a bit limited as to the availibility of certain models. I am thinking something in the 60-70lb range would be about right. I would like to keep the cost under $500.

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Well many of the newer bows are fine and each may have different edges over the other but if you stick with the main brands you should be fine. I shoot a Hoyt and I love it. Just make sure you shoot them and get the right draw length and setup to fit you. You should be able to find a nice bow under $500.

Welcome to this great sport, hobby, pastime, whatever it is it's great.

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as AC stated, most companies make a pretty darn good bow now days. I cant think of a bad one out there. Just go to a reputable bow shop like Cabin Fever and have them size you and shoot as many bows as you can. Take a note book with you or a mini recorder and then take notes after you shoot each bow. Tell youself what you liked and didn't like about each bow. Some will be quieter, some will be faster, some less hand shock, some will seem to aim better for your shooting style.

Shoot as many bows as you can, and then re-shoot them on a later date. Then pick the one that felt a part of you!

Good luck, and enjoy the search. Welcome to the addiction we call archery!!!!

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Are you looking for just a bow or a package for under 500? If your only looking at spend that on the bow expect to pay the same for just acces sights, rest, arrows etc.

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Mr kleen is right. It'll take about a grand or so to outfit yourself. The good thing is, once your there, your there. I bought a new set up last year. Bought the Bear Truth. I think that cost around $550 if I remember right. Not a top shelf bow, but I love it. Affordable, smooth draw. It fit me me. After it was all said and done(bow, accessories, release, arrows, broadheads, camo, a couple new hang on treestands), I'm sure I was pushing $1500 bucks. Worth every penny. This year I just bought a tag!! grin Good luck and have fun! Bow hunting is AWESOME!!

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I would try all the bows that you can afford. I now have a hoyt, before this I shot a diamond triumph. If my friend hadn't cracked a limb, I probably would still have that bow. I paid $450 for the whole package. Then I put about $200 into it for a different sight, rest, release, and peep.

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Bows are notoriously bad for holding there value so you might want to look at a used one. Some guys like to get a new one every other year or every 3rd year (not me, I've had mine for 7 years now) so you can get a pretty nice used set up if you spend the time looking.

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you say you had a cracked limb on a diamond. diamond guarantees their limbs for life.

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No, he had an older bow that he was going to replace anyway, I sold him my diamond to replace his bow with the cracked limb.

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I am was thinking the $500 range for the bow only. I am actually considering a Bear Truth 2, though I think that maybe closer to $600 or $700. Like some of you guys have suggested, I am going to go in and shoot a few different bows and see what feels the best for me.

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If you want to get into archery and are not really sure the committment you will have in the future. I still would recommend spending a good amount, but not breaking the bank, reason being is if you pay less for a bow you may get a little more hand shock, slower and noiser bow, which in turn may turn you off to archery shooting\hunting.

Most of the mid-range bows you find now on the market were the best of the best only a few years ago. I do not think you can go wrong with any of the big names, Matthews, Hoyt, PSE...

I myself bought a brand new mid-range PSE a year and a half ago and lile it very much. It helps to do what Dietz said, go to a reputable dealer and shoot alot of different bows, it will show you the differences.

Good Luck and welcome to the addiction.

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The Truth 2 will run you about 650 but I would highly suggest you take a look at the Diamond Black Ice. In the stores you can get it for just over 600 but Gander Mountain is selling it online for 550 which is a way better deal than you are going to find anywhere else and in my opinion it is hard to find a better bow for the money. Like everyone else has said try several out and find what works for you but I thought I would just let you know about that deal because it is an excellent bow that is pretty close to the price range that you gave

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