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Chode2235

New wheeler

29 posts in this topic

I picked up a great deal on a Polaris sportsman, and would like to use it this winter on the ice. What types of things do you all do to make your wheeler work better for you on the ice.

Favorite products, or modifications?

Photos appreciated if possible. Thanks.

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I have been using a wheeler for a couple of years now to pull my portable. Works great until the snow gets deep. I have done a few things to ensure performance. 1) Make sure you have a good battery, you don't want to be stranded out on the ice. 2) I use synthetic oil to prevent slow turn-over of a cold engine. 3) periodically start it and let it run if setting in one place too long. 4) I have put chains on to aid traction and steering especially on sheer ice. 5) I have added an auger holder on the front rack for easy access when running and gunning. 6) I have a hand held gps mounted on the handle bars for navigation.

The best thing I have learned is exactly how my machine reacts to the cold and how much prime/choke to give it so it starts right off w/o flooding the engine or killing the battery.

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Congrats on the new wheeler ... I'm jealous.

Tow bar on the portable can be very handy. Helps keep the shack from plowing into your back wheels when you stop. Not much of a problem on snow, more so on ice or hardpack.

If it doesn't already have on , a 12v lighter type plug can be handy for pluggin in your GPS.

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Congrats on the purchase and thank you for stimulating the economy. I wonder how long it will be before "stimulate the economy" will be a cliche'? Anyway, I mounted a light on the back of my wheeler with a switch on the bars. This works great for loading/setting up in the dark. I leave the porty hitched up to the wheeler, when its time to pack up I start the wheeler, flip the light on and load er up. The solid tow bar is a must IMO. I made my own. I make most of these type accessories myself because I can and I save ALOT of money by doing so. You will enjoy using your wheeler for fishing! Good luck!

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All of them ideas are great. I would add two more-1 windsheild, keeps the eyes from watering up. 2 hand warmers and thumb warmer. keep them hands warm when running from spot to spot. Have fun and good luck!

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What did you use to make your own tow bar? I have been looking at buying one, but that is a lot of money (for something so simple).

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I used 1/2" electrical conduit and various scrap metals plus my mig welder. sorry i don't have any pics or the knowledge to post them.

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That's alright. I don't know how to weld either smile Do you have it rigged so it is hinged at the sled?

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Yes I do. I've got 2 large washers welded on edge to 2 bolts. The bolts are fastened to the front of the sled.(Fish Trap) Pins are welded to the conduit at a 90 degree angle and fit into the washers. A bungee cord keeps everything tight. If you like, I can take photos and email them to you.

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Do you guys recommend I tow my flip over (otter den), or should I fid someway to get it up off the ground?

I am thinking some sort of rack, or something that attaches to the hitch.

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Do you guys recommend I tow my flip over (otter den), or should I fid someway to get it up off the ground?

I am thinking some sort of rack, or something that attaches to the hitch.

Is your Otter den attached to a sled? I have the Otter II + sled and I tow mine right behind the 4 wheeler. This year I am going to add the hyfax runners.

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Yeah its a sled, that is probably the easiest way. I never put the hyfax runners on though. Are they necessary, needed?

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Otter's are designed to pull on the ground. Hyfax is not as critical if you always are pulling it on snow. If you expect to pull across gravel, parking lot/ramp, etc - then I would recommend the Hyfax to save wear/tear on the sled bottom. They do add a fair amount of weight, I would only put them on if you really need them.

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Chode2235, I tow a Yukon with my wheeler. I use tire chains on the wheeler and after 1 trip across the ice without a cover on the house, you'll be shopping for one. As for a towbar, I've built now 5 towbars for fishing buddies. Cost is about ~$30 in materials. I use 3/4" conduit with eye bolts on one end and eyebolts in the front of the sled for the up and down motion. the pin on the wheeler hitch provides the lateral movement. It's a very simple setup, quite easy to produce and after I get my tub out of the garage rafters(3-4weeks), I'd be happy to email you some pics. Phred52

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1) Make sure you have a good battery, you don't want to be stranded out on the ice. 2) I use synthetic oil to prevent slow turn-over of a cold engine. 3) periodically start it and let it run if setting in one place too long. 4) I have put chains on to aid traction and steering especially on sheer ice. 5) I have added an auger holder on the front rack for easy access when running and gunning. 6) I have a hand held gps mounted on the handle bars for navigation.

That's exactly what I've done too. I switched to a lower weight oil and that helped the starter turn the engine over much easier, hence giving your battery longer cranking life until the engine fires off.

Chains, chains, chains. You won't regret the $50-$60 investment.

RAM GPS mount for the H2O

Yoke-style mounts for the auger which is mounted on the front rack.

Otter ATV Box for the rear rack to stash all of the gear. Otter also has the auger tube that mounts on their box, but I prefer the auger up front. The only negative is you lose that rack space for other items you may want to strap down, such as a shovel when you aren't pulling the shelter which is where I typically put it.

Ice_fishing_2007_small.jpg

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V-bar chains will amaze you with the added traction. Especially in deep snow when you dig down to the ice. All four would rule, but two should be good enough.

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I agree with Phred52 on buying a cover for your portable if you are going to be towing. I went out just before Christmastime last year when we had just gotten ten inches of wet snow. Well, I ended up with about two feet of snow in the tub of the portable after two miles traveled on the lake.

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I use a tilt bed 4X8 trailer to tow my wheeler to the lake, and often, I will unload and then hook the trailer to the wheeler, and leave my truck onshore or near shore. I then load my flipover or my Clam in the back along with the rest of my gear. Then I run&gun until I find fish and then set up my house. If there are two of us, the second man can ride in the trailer instead of behind me on the atv.

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I use a tilt bed 4X8 trailer to tow my wheeler to the lake, and often, I will unload and then hook the trailer to the wheeler, and leave my truck onshore or near shore. I then load my flipover or my Clam in the back along with the rest of my gear. Then I run&gun until I find fish and then set up my house. If there are two of us, the second man can ride in the trailer instead of behind me on the atv.

That's what I do too!!

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Any problems pulling a trailer? I thought about doing the same thing, especially considering all the stuff we bring, i.e. grill, coolers, etc. I like to live it up while I am out there. Steaks, beer, and beer.

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Any problems pulling a trailer? I thought about doing the same thing, especially considering all the stuff we bring, i.e. grill, coolers, etc. I like to live it up while I am out there. Steaks, beer, and beer.

You might have problems if you put a lot of weight on it. The polaris wheelers have independant rear axles right?? If they do you can't put much weight on that before your bottomed out. That's why I got a honda!! grin Straight axle in the back so I can pull some weight on a trailer.

I also built a couple of boxes that I can attach to my racks that hold everything I need for the most part. I built them to hang beyond the racks also so if someone is with they can sit on the wheeler behind me. I just have to figure out a good way to lock an auger down to the front rack when runnin and gunnin. Any ideas anyone?

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Originally Posted By: prov1900
Any problems pulling a trailer? I thought about doing the same thing, especially considering all the stuff we bring, i.e. grill, coolers, etc. I like to live it up while I am out there. Steaks, beer, and beer.

You might have problems if you put a lot of weight on it. The polaris wheelers have independant rear axles right?? If they do you can't put much weight on that before your bottomed out. That's why I got a honda!! grin Straight axle in the back so I can pull some weight on a trailer.

I also built a couple of boxes that I can attach to my racks that hold everything I need for the most part. I built them to hang beyond the racks also so if someone is with they can sit on the wheeler behind me. I just have to figure out a good way to lock an auger down to the front rack when runnin and gunnin. Any ideas anyone?

I made one from scrap 2x6. One piece lays flat and is the width of the front rack. Two short pieces are screwed to the ends (sticking up) and have a notch cut in them to cradle the auger. This cradle gets mounted to the rack using ratchet straps. The auger lays in the notches and is held down with bungees or another ratchet strap. The notches are actually round. I cut them with a hole saw.

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Interesting, what types of materials are you using on your rear boxes?

I made them out of wood since we have a whole shed full of it. I made the box out of plywood and put it on 2 "studs" I'll call them (about 1x2). The "studs" slide in and out of some slots that I built and will keep mounted to the wheeler all winter long. I did the same, except smaller, for the front box. This way I can slide the racks on and off quickly if I need to. I just drilled a hole through the slots and studs and shove a bolt through that to keep them locked on the wheeler. I made the slots out of wood and mounted them on a flat 1x piece of wood that I attach to my 4-wheeler racks using u-bolts. It takes me a little while to attach them to the racks, thats why I felt it was a good idea to make the racks quick to remove incase I have to for trailering it to the lake. If I have time tonight I will try to post pictures of it.

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