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JigginIsLife

Help on Wiring.

13 posts in this topic

Well first off let me tell you i have 0 knowledge in wiring up stuff. It seems like it should be simple but i cant find a decent HSOforum to explain it to me so this is what i want. i want to know how i would go about wiring up something like a toggle switch for lights is or will there be instructions on the box if i go buy one and where would i go buy some??

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This is a crude and simple drawing of a switch circuit. If all you are doing is wiring a toggle into an existing light circuit you would just cut the positive wire and insert the switch by connecting one side of the cut to one terminal of the switch and the other side of the cut to the other terminal of the switch. I hope this helps.

simpleswitch.jpg

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The switch can also go on the negative side as well.

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That was a very good and simple way to explain how to add a toggle switch!

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Hey that is awesome that is exactly what i was looking for thanks a bunch

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To cut down on switch cost I just use common house hold switches they are about .50 cents a piece as apposed to 4-6 bucks.Great diagram .I have also gone to the junk yard and picked up switch panels from an old school bus

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Pretty cure a house hold switch wouldnt work because they are 110v instead of 12... i may be wrong though.

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House switch will work just fine. There's nothing special in the switch that requires 110v ac versus 12volt dc. It's just like touching two wires together. I either makes or breaks the circuit.

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Here's an old picture that I have of the wiring that I put in my portable. I installed a small fuse, just incase.

wiring.jpg

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Good point on the fuse. If forgot to put the breakeer back in the boat this spring and we were out on mille lacs about 6 mi out and the boat started on fire at 5am (no one within miles) because the rough water caused the trolling motor connector to loose a wire that then touched ground. The 4 gauge wire was basically a heating element the whole lenth on the boat. It was very scary especially when the new fire extinguisher didn't do anything. I disconnected the battery and we spashed water on it and got it out. There is a certain sinking feeling you get when you are that far from shore in cold water and your only means of getting back is on fire. Fuses are definitely a very good idea. Connect the fuse in the same manner as the switch (series) in the positive wire near the battery.

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first time myself trying to do anything like this. let alone a total camper conversion. thought i'd buy a cheap camper and cut some holes to go icefishing. WRONG!!!!. ended up taking whole frame off trailer to restore. $3000 later i'm still envolved! figured i have money envested i better finish it. great help. thank you!

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broman, Though you DO need to watch the AMPERAGE you're trying to control!! A house switch will easily handle 15 amps. A 12 volt battery is capable of 750 amps+, which will melt a household switch like butter, much like a fuse. Jiggin, If you use house switches, fuse each circuit near the battery, for your safety. rusty ironman, Nice work!! even if you should have problems, you won't have any problems finding where it is!! GOOD WORK!!! Phred52

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Everyone PLEASE be careful with electricity! 12 volts may not sound dangerous, but it can be! Don't be lulled by the fact that the voltage is lower than in your house. For example, if you have two circuits, one running at 12 volts and one running at 120 volts, and both circuits have the same resistance, the 12 volt circuit will have 10 times more current(amps)! You can calculate the number of amps a circuit will carry with a simple formula. AMPS=WATTS/VOLTS. In a lighting circuit add up the total wattage of the lights you plan to have. Take that number and divide it by 12. This will be your amps and will determine your fuse size. Other loads such as sonars,tvs,etc. probably have the amperage listed somewhere on it. Add these up and fuse accordingly. It is also equally important to use wire big enough to carry the load. You may have the right size fuse but if the wire isn't big enough to carry the load it will melt before the fuse blows. This is how cars and fish houses burn down! Oh yeah, all fuses and switches go in the POSITIVE side of the circuit. If anyone has questions about this stuff PLEASE ask! You can email me if you like at bigsparkdm@yahoo.com

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