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CarlWBL

Choosing a pup

35 posts in this topic

I recently found out that I will be a proud owner of a Sharpshooters bloodline GSP come Jan/Feb. I have 2nd pick of females and I'm curious as to the characteristics I should be looking for when choosing a pup. I will most likely be getting her trained for trials and will definitely have her out in the field. This is my first dog of this nature and am excited to develop her to her fullest potential. I can't wait to learn and grow with her by my side.

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Congrats! I think Sharpshooter Kennel produces dogs geared more for Hunt Tests and NAVHDA tests rather than field trials. They seem to have a reputation for producing nice dogs.

There's no magic to picking a pup. The trick is to pick a good breeding. If you have a good breeding you can reach in a pick what you like. Just watch the pup's interact for a while and pick the one you like. Then separate it from the litter and see how it does being held and played with. See if it's curious about things, etc... If you like it then that's the one. If you don't like it then start over with a different pup.

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Do any of you do those puppy tests? I've had friends who've done them - from dogs of really nice hunting/trial lines, and the ones he liked came out pretty close to each other.

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Nope. I just pick the best breeding I can afford and pick a pup I like. Then just go out and hunt the heck out of 'em.

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You need to bring a live bird (chuckar or a pigeon). Hold the pups back that you like. Show them the bird......rub it in the noses. Then hide the bird in some grass close to them. Some dogs would rather keep playing and they grow up to be nice house pets. The ones that go for the kill are the hunting dogs.

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You need to bring a live bird (chuckar or a pigeon). Hold the pups back that you like. Show them the bird......rub it in the noses. Then hide the bird in some grass close to them. Some dogs would rather keep playing and they grow up to be nice house pets. The ones that go for the kill are the hunting dogs.

wow.... I am going to have to disagree with you on that. I dont think you can judge a 6 to 8 week old pup like that. Saying it will be a house dog if the pup tries playing instead of finding the bird. no way...

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I have to agree with 2thepoint on that one. In no way will that mean that you will not have a good gun dog.

The trick is to pick a good breeding. If you have a good breeding you can reach in a pick what you like.

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At 6 weeks they show very little of what their personality will be like. Show up to take a look and you will know less then what the breeder has been able to observe.

The one off in the corner by himself might be the weak one or he might be the independent one that all ready drank his fill of milk.

Pick your breed.

Pick good breeding.

I know what I'm looking for as far as conformation so the parents must show that. In my case I use Labs. They could have the best breeding but not what I'm looking for as far as build.

I'd like to see them perform in the field as well. I'm not concerned about the level of training either has, I just want to see if they have what I like.

After all that I feel I'll be getting the pup I want.

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I'm right with gspman; reputable breeder, good researched blood lines, all the pups should pretty much be good to go. Pick one you like.

If there was a pup that was really bad, I would expect the breeder to identify it. I've have bought pups from out of state sight unseen. Let the breeder know what you are looking for and what you plan to do and let them do the picking.

I am not saying don't go to look at pups, because that is pretty darn fun. However, usually things get narrowed down pretty quick. First, there is gender. Second, usually there is a certain color, or markings you like. In most cases that limits the field and at that point you might as well flip a coin. Making a pick at a pup @ 5-6-7 weeks based on certain traits is best left up to the breeder. You just don't have enough interaction to make a justifiable pick after a couple of visits.

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male or female which is better as far as a hunter and also a family dog

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Most "experts" would say a spayed female is the best all around dog for a family pet and a hunting dog. I would agree with that as well.

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If you are only going to have one dog(which is crazy talk if you ask me) I would get a male. Don't get me wrong I loved my females but the male can just hunt harder longer. Just stronger with more stamina.I know there are exceptions to all rule but in general this aplies if you are comparing shorthair to shorthair or lab to lab etc. etc. I think females learn and mature a little faster then males do but the boys catch up soon enough..Just my 2cents

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What Sharpshooter breeding are you looking to get a pup out of? I have a 6 month old out of Cash..she has been a great dog and you will be happy with any of them.

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If you are only going to have one dog(which is crazy talk if you ask me) I would get a male. Don't get me wrong I loved my females but the male can just hunt harder longer. Just stronger with more stamina.I know there are exceptions to all rule but in general this aplies if you are comparing shorthair to shorthair or lab to lab etc. etc. I think females learn and mature a little faster then males do but the boys catch up soon enough..Just my 2cents

X2 for sure on the male

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If it were stictly a hunting dog to be kenneled outside I might agree about a male. However for a house dog/family pet/hunting dog a spayed female is tops.

Spayed females don't come into season, don't lift their leg pee/mark every thing they pass, don't mark in the house, aren't as aggressive, etc...

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I have never seen a female of any breed that hunts near as good as a male of the same breed. I have both a male and female setter and 2 other female dogs so I am not biased. I just think if you want a good hunting dog a male is the way to go if you are only going to have one dog. Female dogs just dont have the drive that a male does in the feild. I have not had any trouble with the male marking in the house or peeing all over the place and he is in intact.

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But Pointers are such sissy dogs, aren't they?

Come on, be honest....

smile

This is a positive thread with a good discussion about choosing the right pup. Lets keep it that way. It always comes down to somebody who knows nothing about the breed bashing it.

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Someone always has to try spark the pointer vs. flusher argument..I own springers and setters they both have a place but one is not tougher than the next. Anyway the guy has made up his mind he's getting a pointer he could care less if it's a sissy or not. Besides most of us pointer guys are too refined to get drawn into such a debate......lol

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I personally always take the most aggressive one of the litter. Theory being you can always take "it" out of them but you cannot put "it" in them.

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I competed SUCCESSFULLY in both AKC and American Field trials for 20 years. I had both shorthairs and pointers in my own kennels and ran other breeds for other people. I've bred a number of both good litters and some clunkers. I have more than likely culled more dogs than 90% of the bird hunters have owned. A few thoughts:

Picking a pup comes down to picking genetics. They may be obvious ones in a litter than you would not want but the breeder should have seen this and "reacted" accordingly. Best pointers I ever owned were both out of breeding that was of the type the complains turned out to be. One a shooting dog and the other true horseback prairie all-age. I never saw either pup until they came out of a travel crate at the airport.

All of my own dogs that I had success w/ were complains. The above mentioned all-age dog was out of Evolution crossed to a Re d Water Rex / White Knight dam. She was broke to W/S/K at 11 months, & never really bobbled birds...ever. Would run for hours off horseback and to the front. I was working in the sandhills of NE w/ a friend who had a string of Britts. Some clients of his saw me getting Maggie ready to have a workout in 90 degree heat and towing a long 1 1/2" thick drag rope and asked Bill what was up. His reply, "Don't worry. the rope won't be on the ground much, just try to keep up". complains vs dogs is strictly a matter of personal choice IMHO.

More than any other breed, Pointers have a century of breeding for "hunt" and only that going for them. I've had them so bloody and raw hunting in snow that you would think that the SPCA would be appalled, but they go crazy when you take another dog out of the box. The one draw back is they can be harder to see in snow..much like the GSP lines I preferred.

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rmkod,

The dam is VC Lakeview Laserpoint Greta, from a litter at Sharpshooters about 4 years ago I think. The stud that they will try to use is "Rev" (Sharpshooters HotRod), from Tango and Tara. My buddy has a year old dam from there as well, Scarecrow's Gimme More Gun, and she just passed her NA this past summer.

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Mine is out of VC Sharpshooters Man in Black, and Sharpshooters Here 4 the Party. There are a pics of her on the puppies part of Sharpshooters webpage (her name is June) and on the progeny page. She has been great so far, the true test will be ND pheasants next week.

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I am a member of the St Croix Navhda but train her myself for the most part. I am thinking about possibly sending her for training next summer, but not sure yet. If you get the pup and want to do some training next year I live in New Brighton, so not too far from you.

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