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croixflats

Batteries for digital

9 posts in this topic

So what is the best type of batteries for digital cameras.

I have used two differant types of rechareable and after a short time they seem to loose charge even when not in use.

Are rechargeables the way to go or is it better to buy a fresh pack of lithium before an outing.

I'm running a Cannon S21S powershot. Not the happiest with the camera but will do till next upgrade.

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What type of batteries does it take, AA?

I use two or three brands of AA rechargeables in my flashes, as well as my handheld GPS and small flashlights, and they all hold their charge well and offer a lot of performance. They are far more economical for me than non-rechargeables.

You might try making sure a couple sets of them are fully charged before leaving for an outing and making sure the camera is in the "off" position until you need it turned on. Maybe you are doing that already. Another possibility is that the rechargeables you are using are old or defective.

In my experience, rechargeables will lose a bit of charge over time when not used, so before every photo shoot or outdoors excursion that will need AA batteries, I put them on the charger to make sure they are topped off.

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I have that same camera, and found that the energizer rechargeables lasted longer than the same brand non-rechargeables. It makes a difference on how much you edit on camera. I typically run the batteries until they are dead, then do a full recharge. I always keep an extra set with me.

I upgraded to a Digital Rebel XT, but still use the S2IS for the macro, supermacro, and wide angle.

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Thanks. I don't use the camera as often as I like so it does sit a while between uses. I'll just have to be more aware of the battery issue and stick with the rechargeables.

Fishinchicks I to went with the energizer rechargeables and they seem to work pretty well compared to the sony ones I tried.

With your power shot do you have problems staying focus around dusk and also while using the telephoto.

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croix, I dont' have experience with that specific camera, but autofocus on any camera depends on contrast for the autofocus to "grab" well. The more sophisticated the camera, the better it can function autofocusing in low light.

At dusk, contrast tends to be low, and autofocus will tend to hunt more before it locks on, if it's able to lock on at all. At extreme telephoto on handheld point-and-shoots, it's a technique challenge to hold the camera steady enough to keep the focus point on your subject, and that makes it just as tough for autofocus to function on those cameras as low light does.

One of the brands of rechargeables I use is Energizer, and they work well.

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Well the problem is that most rechargeable batteries will lose their charge if they sit around unused. If you want a rechargeable that is ready to go and doesn't slowly discharge, look to buy what is called a hybrid.

HYBRID batteries offer the best of both worlds: ready to use right out of the package like alkaline, but can be recharged and reused like rechargeables. Advanced electron retention technology allows batteries to maintain their charge. Batteries DO NOT self discharge. Batteries can be used in any device. HYBRID batteries can be used in any charger. Batteries last 4x longer than conventional NiMH rechargeables.

LD7154.jpg

Either that or use the Lithium. I take a lot of pictures and am currently on only my second set of lithiums this year.

EVEL92BP2_1_1.JPG

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I can't sit or stand still enough with the telephoto to consistantly get clear shots, so I bought a gorilla type tripod. That seems to help not only with telephoto, but with the supermacro as well. Here is an example of a dandylion my daughter took using one of the macro settings.

2922447445_c6d5eb2796_o.jpg

This one was handheld at full zoom (not digital zoom). This one was taken by my youngest daughter.

NewYorkChristmas211b.jpg

Taking pictures at dusk has always been an issue for me. Using a tripod helped there as well. However, sometimes you can use it to your advantage!

Kansas2006180a.jpg

Does this help at all?

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Hmm. Just realized that all three of my daughters are represented in that last post. grin Daughter two took the first one, daughter three took the middle one, and daughter one is in the last one!

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Fishinchicks that helps a lot, thanks. Great pictures. Looks like your daughters have a flare for photography

Stfcatfish thanks for the explanations clear and imformative as always.

Dtro thanks I'll defantely give those hybryds a go

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