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Tyler D

spotting scopes

5 posts in this topic

So I am in the market for a spotting scope, I am really interested in a higher end model. I have made quite a few western trips mostly lower elevation prarie type hunts, but I will soon be going on my first true mountain hunt. And being that I am 23 years old and am to the point where with the points I have I should be drawing some pretty major tags in the next 5 years, and even more major tags in about 10, I want to buy something good. I like the leupold gold ring 15-45X it is realativley cheap at about $1K, but I am wondering if 45X is going to be enough or if I should step it up to 60X?

I am also thinking of buying a 20-60X swarovski which is going to be closer to $2K, but if im going to have it my whole life I might as well buy some thing good. So any mountain hunters out there have any advice on a 45X vs. a 60X?

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I'm an avid bowhunter and seriously looking at doing some DIY bowhunts for mule deer out west. I have the book "Backcountry Bowhunting" by Cameron Haynes, who is an authority on this type of hunting. Here's what his opinion is for quality spotting scopes.

Leica 62mm compact (16-48x) armoured $1694 & non armor $1544

Nikon 60mm ED (20-45x or 20-60x) $975

Minox MD62 ED (21-42x w/ L.E.R. eye piece) $919

Swarovski 80 mm or 65 mm.

The author was concerned with quality and light weight as he backpacks way, way back in.

For binoculars he says any of the following in this order, all 10x42's. Swarovski EL or Leica Ultravid (best), Zeiss Victory FL (2nd), Leupold Gold Ring, Steiner Predator, Nikon Premiere LX (3rd), Cabela's Alaskan Guide 10x42 (4th bargain).

Hope this helps!

Brian

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Thanks for the reply, I'm really leaning towards the swarovski even though it carries a hefty price tag. I am just worried that 45 is going to be under gunning for those wide open spaces.

There is nothing better than mule deer hunting, I've never bowhunted them but probably will some day. Good luck with it hope your building some points in colorado, the holy grail of modern day mule deer hunting.

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I was out in the Medora, N.D. area a couple fall's ago bowhunting muley's. Made an awesome stalk on a 170" class buck, only to have a covey of sharptails flush and spook the buck and his harem. A bowhunter killed him the following week, while his buddy shot the new N.D. archery state record, over 200", we never saw that one.

This year we're heading out near Bowman, N.D. the 3rd week of October. For now western N.D. and maybe even eastern Mont. would be more do-able for me, at least until child support goes away.

Brian

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My dad bowhunted the bowman area about 10 years ago, he said they saw quite a few nice bucks while they were out there. Never closed the deal on any bucks but tagged a couple of does for meat.

If you are serious about doing some bigger hunts later, it costs $20 a year to get mule deer points in colorado some of the best units can take up to 12 years to draw, especially for the most sought after seasons. They also have some good bowhunting only mountain goat and sheep units that cost $3 a year to get points.

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