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Moe Szyslak

Snowmobile for ice fishing, how do you do it?

14 posts in this topic

Im looking into getting a snowmobile this year and was wondering how others haul/drive out to the lake and then to their spot on the ice. I have a portable otter with a sled. Do people put sled and portable on their trailer and pull it to the lake, then just pull their portable out on the ice? Anyone pull their trailer out with their snowmobile? Anyone able to put all their fishing stuff and snowmobile in their truck and not use a trailer?

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I trailer my portable and sled to the lake. Depending on the lake, the access, and the overall mission, that determines where I park. If it's just a solo trip, I'll often park at the access and pull the porty out with the sled and fish. If the access often has bad ice heaves or thin ice, I'll park at the access as well.

If the access is known for smash and grabs, I'll drive out to the lake and park the truck and trailer off shore and unload. If I'll be fishing from a central location, or with other people, we'll typically park where we want to fish, and use the sled to move around and try different spots, especially if we are chasing crappies or tullibees.

oh yeah, if you trailer out on the lake, watch out for drifts. It can be a nightmare if you get stuck.

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I have a single place sled trailer put my sled on that and my pull type sled in the back of my pickup It takes alot of [PoorWordUsage] around for me I have no patience it works good thou for early or late ice.

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I depends on what I'm up to for the day and what time of the year it is. If I'm up at LOW I'll drive out on the lake when the road is open and park out there. I'll stay with the truck if im getting a bite and sometimes never use the snowmobile. If the ice isn't safe for vehicles, what choice do we have?

If you are new to pulling your portable behind the snowmobile you want to make sure that everything in there is padded and cinched down other wise you will have a sled full of battered gear. Find a way to store your electronics and food on the snowmobile by installin saddle bags or an equipment box. Look back into the archives under "portable modifications" and you will find some posts on ways to secure gear. Maybe we can get some photos attacehed to this thread.

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As far as pulling an Otter behind a snowmobile, I pulled a fully-loaded sled to my cabin all of the time. I don't have one of those stiff connector bars. I just tie the sled rope around the grab bar on the back of my snowmobile. As long as you come to a controlled stop, the sled won't go flying into the snowmobile. The only time that it's preferred to have a stiff connector is if you plan to go down hills.

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Quote:
The only time that it's preferred to have a stiff connector is if you plan to go down hills.

Or if you plan on having anyone ride on the sled, then you need the rigid connector by law.

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I have a two place trailer. Sled on one side and portable on the other side. It works really good.

Most of the time I just pull out onto the lake and unload and pull the house to the spot. Other times when the ice is very safe and a nice road plowed, I will drive truck and trailer to spot and maybe not even unload the sled.

I would highly recommend a rigid hitch for the portable. It’s not just going down hills that you will need one. Try taking a sharp corner or going over snow drifts at a high speed with a rope. It doesn’t work very good wink

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A rigid hitch is a must have item,you never know when you have to stop real quick!

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esp if you have a studded track! otter sleds and covers are not cheap always go with the tow bar saves on equipment taleted ones can even fab thier own I just found it easier to buy 2 for my 3 otter sleds

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I have two place trailer with room for both sleds and house, once on lake pulled it like this

oktkdj.jpg

Down Deep isn't kidding, you have to pack your sled correctly and drive conservativley or you will break everything...

I added a rigid bar and the end of the season but didnt get to try it out, looking forward to having a little more control...

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I have a two place trailer, and tow that to the access and go from thier with the porti and sled. now reading these posts I will prolly fab up a rigid hitch sounds safer and could save some equip. I have had a drill bounce out on me once, yes it broke had to zip tie it together worked a couple more season and the crash finally got the best of it. now I have my porti rigged so everything is tied down with brackets or ropes. I usually never have a problem pulling with a rope just take it easy when slowing down, when my brother goes with one of us just sits in the porte and that really helps with the porte swayin in the corners and keeps it on the ground better.

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Does anyone fit it all in the back of the truck? I really only intend to use this on Mille Lacs early/late ice. I am not sure how excited I would be with leaving the trailer connected to the truck at the landing while I am out fishing.

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It would be pretty tough to get a sled/house/gear all the bed of a truck. Maybe with one man house it might be possible to stuff the house sideways alongside the sled.

Get a good coupler/trailer lock and you shouldn't need to worry about anyone messing with your trailer.

With a tilt bed double place, I can drive the sled right on, unhook the house, pull that on, secure with straps and I'm on the road, very little lifting involved at all.

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On my trailer I have a lock on the coupler and then one on my ramp so nobody steels that. That would suck to find out you have no ramp and nobody to help lift a sled onto a trailer.

If they can rip it off someone will.

You wont get a sled, ice house and all your gear in a truck and not lose stuff out the back. Best to find a small trailer for the sled. Look around I saw a lot of small cheap 1 sled trailers when looking for my double wide. Yu should be able to find something in the $300 or less range.

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